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http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2017-09/27/c_136643493.htm

WASHINGTON, Sept. 26 (Xinhua) — In the wake of an opioid epidemic, acupuncturists in the United States issued a white paper on Tuesday, recommending acupuncture as a primary non-pharmacologic method for pain relief and management.

“The United States is facing a national opioid epidemic, and medical systems are in need of non-pharmacologic strategies that can be employed to decrease the public’s opioid dependence,” said the 21-page white paper.

Official figures showed that opioid overdoses kill 91 Americans every single day and more than half of those deaths involve prescription opioids.

Titled “Acupuncture’s Role in Solving the Opioid Epidemic,” the white paper said “acupuncture has emerged as a powerful, evidence-based, safe, cost-effective, and available treatment modality suitable to meeting this need.”

Organizations that contributed to this paper included the American Society of Acupuncturists, the American Alliance for Professional Acupuncture Safety, the Acupuncture Now Foundation, the American Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Association, and the American TCM Society and National Federation of TCM Organizations.

The white paper said acupuncture has been shown to be effective for treating various types of pain, with the strongest evidence emerging for back pain, neck pain, shoulder pain, chronic headache, and osteoarthritis.

It said mechanisms of action for acupuncture have been extensively researched, which found the ancient Chinese practice increase the production and release of endogenous opioids in animals and humans.

“Acupuncture should be recommended as a first line treatment for pain before opiates are prescribed, and may reduce opioid use,” it wrote.

“Further, acupuncture’s cost-effectiveness could dramatically decrease health care expenditures, both from the standpoint of treating acute pain and through avoiding the development of opioid addiction that requires costly care, destroys quality of life, and can lead to fatal overdose.”

The white paper came about a week after the U.S. National Association of Attorneys General sent a letter to America’s Health Insurance Plans, asking its insurance company members to review their payment and coverage policies in order to promote alternatives to opioids such as acupuncture.

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Fan,Zheng,Yang-Evidence that dry needling the intention to practice acupuncture. JACM-2016 Last Version

Dry needling is a short form acupuncture, currently Physical Therapiests and other related professionals want to practice acupuncture under such a name with only 20-30 hours weekend training. This may cause big negative impact to public safety and acupuncture (both traditional and medical) profession.

We just published an article in a known SCI journal–Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (JACM),  which treated this article as a High Impact Article. Please read at(I also attached a copy of Manuscript):

Evidence That Dry Needling Is the Intent to Bypass Regulation to Practice Acupuncture in the United States
Arthur Yin Fan, Ling Zheng, Guanhu Yang  Read Now

Fan,Zheng,Yang-Evidence that dry needling the intention to practice acupuncture. JACM-2016 Last Version

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Article from: http://www.thebestschools.org/rankings/best-acupuncture-schools-us/

Acupuncture relieves pain, promotes healing and addresses a wide range of health problems for millions of people all over the world. Acupuncture, an important component of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), is based on the idea of returning the body to a state of harmony or ideal functioning. Acupuncture rebalances the flow of energy (Qi) in the body. Acupuncture influences human energy through manipulating the meridians of the body, connected energetically with internal organs and systems.

The World Health Organization’s official report titled Acupuncture: Review and Analysis of Reports on Controlled Clinical Trials, specifically listed 28 diseases, symptoms or conditions which acupuncture (through clinical trials) has proved to provide effective treatment. The US National Institutes of Health issued a consensus statement proposing acupuncture as a therapeutic intervention for complimentary medicine. The American Medical Association Journal of Internal Medicine concluded acupuncture effectively reduces chronic pain with few side effects.

Because of acupuncture’s increasing popularity, the number of acupuncture schools has grown over the years. The schools, also known as Traditional Chinese Medicine schools or Traditional Oriental Medicine schools, typically teach the fundamentals and related Western medical subjects.

With numerous institutions offering acupuncture programs, it’s not easy selecting a school. Prospective students may begin their search with schools which received accreditation from the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (ACAOM).

The Council of Colleges of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine as well as the American Association of Oriental Medicine established ACAOM in 1982 as a not-for-profit organization. The U.S. Department of Education recognizes ACAOM as a “specialized and professional” accrediting agency.

ACAOM has more than 50 schools and colleges with accreditation or candidacy status. All of the schools we selected for our list have received accreditation from ACAOM.

The Best Acupuncture Schools

Factors which influenced our choice of schools making this list as well as their relative order include the following:

  • Quality of faculty, not only as practitioners of acupuncture but also as researchers advancing the field
  • Comprehensiveness of the training program, including hands-on training
  • Internships
  • Success in training students who can lead the field
  • How long the school has been in existence and its reputation for excellence during that time
  • Doctoral program in acupuncture, not required but a plus for a school

The Best Acupuncture Schools in the United States

1Oregon College of Oriental Medicine

(Portland, Oregon)Oregon College of Medicine

Established in 1983, Oregon College of Oriental Medicine (OCOM) is one of the oldest Chinese medicine colleges in the nation. OCOM integrates classical theory with a modern practical approach to health and wellness. The college, known for research, has received research grants from the National Institutes of Health/National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. The Research Department’s partners include the University of Arizona, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland State University, Legacy Health System and Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research.

Oregon College of Oriental Medicine offers a Master of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine and a Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine degrees.

Students receive a foundation in Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture, qi cultivation and therapeutic massage as well as a focus on the collaboration between Western biomedicine and Chinese medicine.

The college infuses the master’s and doctoral curricula with research literacy and appreciation.

The Master of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (MAOM) degree program includes coursework and training in the practice and theory of herbal medicine, acupuncture, nutrition, exercise, therapeutic massage and more. The program also includes courses in anatomy, physiology, community health and practitioner/patient dynamics.

Full-time students can earn their master’s degree in 36 months. Students complete 3,334.5 hours – 214.86 credits – for their degree, including 994.5 hours of clinical education.

Students receive clinical training at the college’s clinic and at off-campus centers. They also complete 32 hours of a Community Health Externship at Hooper Center, Project Quest and Old Town Clinic.

The Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (DAOM) program, a clinically focused postgraduate degree program which leads to a clinical doctorate degree, consists of 1,221 hours — 48.6 credits, including 670 clinical hours and 551 classroom hours. Designed for practitioners who want to earn the degree while maintaining a practice, the program features 20 intensive teaching modules over 24 months. Most modules occur Friday to Monday and include classroom content and clinical work. Between modules, students complete independent study assignments and homework, reading assignments, clinical case studies and more.

The Doctor of Acupuncture program includes two specializations – Aging Adults and Women’s Health. Students complete one year on each specialization.

Students also complete three 60-hour Clinical Selectives – externships, special clinical studies, writing skills development or supervision skills development, as well as a capstone project.

Oregon College of Oriental Medicine conducts research and treats patients at two Portland clinics and also operates an herbal medicinary, where master’s degree students get hands-on experience during their Herbal Practicum.

The Master of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine and the Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine degrees received accreditation from the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (ACAOM).

Admission requirements: Applicants for the master’s degree program must complete three years – or 135 quarter credits/90 semester credits – at an accredited institution.

Doctoral program applicants must hold a master’s degree or diploma in acupuncture or Oriental medicine from an ACAOM-accredited college or school or the international equivalent. They also must have training in herbal medicine.

2Emperor’s College School of Traditional Oriental Medicine

(Santa Monica, California)EmperorsCollege

Emperor’s College School of Traditional Oriental Medicine, founded in 1983, is one of the oldest acupuncture schools in the United States. The college is known for having one of the most distinguished faculties among Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine schools in the nation, its robust veterans clinical outreach program, and for the comprehensiveness of its programs, offering in-depth study in every major acupuncture style. The school is unique in offering a “qi cultivation” component which includes all five major styles of tai chi and several qi gong forms.

The Emperor’s College teaching clinic, open to the public, offers a one-to-one intern-to-patient ratio and reports more than 15,000 patient visits a year.

The school has a robust civic engagement program. Los Angeles County issued Emperor’s College a special commendation for its work with the Los Angeles homeless veteran’s community. The 2015 Special Olympics World Games selected the college, its alumni, faculty, and Master’s and Doctoral students to be the sole provider of holistic wellness services to the over 7,000 athletes and coaches representing 165 nations from around the world.

The school’s alumni have gone on to practice in and perform advanced integrative research at western medical hospitals and clinics, open private practices around the world, write for important publications, and serve in senior administrative positions at Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine schools.

Emperor’s College School of Traditional Oriental Medicine offers Master of Traditional Oriental Medicine and Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine degree options. Both programs focus on preparing professional healthcare providers who can integrate Eastern and Western medical knowledge.

Students receive a foundation in the theory, history, diversity and philosophy of Oriental medicine as well as hands-on experience in the diagnosis and treatment of patients in various practice settings.

The four-year Master of Traditional Oriental Medicine (MTOM) degree program consists of 3,210 instructional hours or 970 hours of internship and 224 didactic units. Students can also take the program on a part-time basis and finish in up to eight years.

Emperor’s College School of Traditional Oriental Medicine offers its curriculum year-round with 11-week quarters.

The Master of Traditional Oriental Medicine degree program includes courses in acupuncture, biomedicine, Oriental medicine, Western nutrition and Chinese herbal medicine.

Students complete clinical training in an on-campus acupuncture clinic and training in Western medical center such as the Roy and Patricia Disney Family Cancer Center and the Venice Family Clinic, a Federally-qualified community health center.

The Master’s degree program provides concentrations such as Classical Acupuncture, Korean Acupuncture, Japanese Acupuncture and Nei Gong. Master’s degree students can also tailor the degree to their personal and professional goals through electives such as advanced herbal medicine, advanced tai chi, classical Chinese medicine and advanced qi gong.

The Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (DAOM) degree program offers a dual specialization in physical medicine and internal medicine.

The DAOM curriculum includes advanced training in all aspects of TCM/Oriental medicine and within two specialty areas, applicable biomedical science and advanced patient assessment, diagnosis and treatment.

The 1,250-hour curriculum consists of 600 hours of didactic instruction and 650 hours of advanced clinical rotations.
Designed for working acupuncturists, classes meet Thursday to Sunday once a month for 22 consecutive months.

Students complete clinical hours through internships, preceptorships and mentorships. During clinical hours, students incorporate community service with educational support to the master’s degree interns.

The program follows a cohort model; students receive instruction in reproductive medicine, cardiology, oncology, sports medicine, stroke rehabilitation and more.

Doctoral students also complete a capstone project.

The Master of Traditional Oriental Medicine degree program and the Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine degree program have received accreditation from the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (ACAOM). The California Acupuncture Board also approved the college. Its master’s degree graduates can sit for the California Acupuncture Licensing Exam. Graduates can also sit for the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine exam.

Admission requirements: Emperor’s College prefers applicants hold a bachelor’s degree or at least an associate’s degree or have 60 semester units of general education from a regionally accredited degree-granting university or college. The college also allows applicants to earn educational requirements through assessments such as the American College Testing Proficiency Program, the U.S. Armed Forces Institute Program or College Advanced Placement.

Doctoral program applicants must hold a master’s degree or completed a master’s level program in Oriental medicine from an ACAOM-accredited or –candidate institution, or the foreign equivalent. Applicants also must hold current clinical license or credentials in their state, province or country of residence as well as current CPR/AED and first aid certification.

Emperor’s College School of Traditional Oriental Medicine may also grant acceptance to the DAOM program based on an applicant’s clinical practice and examinations.

3New England School of Acupuncture

(Newton, Massachusetts)new-england-school-of-acupuncture

New England School of Acupuncture (NESA), founded in 1975, was the first acupuncture school in the nation. NESA is part of the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. NESA, known for its research program, is a National Institutes of Health-supported Developmental Center for Research in Complementary and Alternative Medicine. The New England School of Acupuncture has received more than $5 million in grants.

The school offers two master’s degree programs with multiple track options.

Students can focus on acupuncture and earn a Master in Acupuncture (MAc) degree or combine acupuncture with Chinese Herbal Medicine (CHM) for a Master’s in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (MAOM) degree.

Regardless of their chosen degree, all students complete a core curriculum in Chinese Acupuncture Styles. The program provides students with a foundation in Eastern and Western approaches to medicine and includes core courses in medical theory, diagnostic and treatment skills of traditional Chinese medicine.

Students can tailor the degree to their personal goals with several track options — Pain Management, Chinese Herbal Medicine, Japanese Acupuncture Styles or a combination. Students also can choose to complete a certificate program in pain management along with another track. NESA is a leader in Japanese acupuncture education in the United States.

The Pain Management track provides students with an understanding of Western and Eastern approaches to pain and allows students to earn dual master’s degrees from the New England School and Tufts University School of Medicine.

Master in Acupuncture students complete nine internship rotations for 630 clinical training hours and must perform 250 documented treatments and evaluate 50 patients.

Master in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine students complete 10 internship rotations for 720 clinical training hours and must perform 350 treatments, treat 50 patients and write 75 Chinese herbal prescriptions.

Students complete internships in the school’s Teaching Center and biomedical partner facilities in the Boston area. They also can choose from more than 60 assistantship sites.

Full-time students can complete the Chinese Acupuncture Styles program in 33 months, the Chinese Herbal Medicine program in 36 months, the dual program (Chinese Herbal Medicine and Japanese Acupuncture Styles) in 36 months and the Pain Management program in 33 months.

The Master’s degree in Acupuncture and the Master’s degree in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine received accreditation from the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (ACAOM). New England Schools of Acupuncture received authorization from the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education to grant master’s degrees in acupuncture, and acupuncture and oriental medicine.

Admission requirements: Applicants must hold a baccalaureate-level degree from an accredited institution.

4American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine

(San Francisco, California)American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine

The American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine (ACTCM), founded in 1980, merged with the California Institute of Integral Studies, also based in San Francisco, in 2015. The college attracts students from all over the world. ACTCM has one of the largest TCM libraries in the United States.

Several faculty members have served in leadership roles for the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.

ACTCM offers master and doctoral degrees in Traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture.

The college operates the Acupuncture & Herbal Clinic and provides presentations and lectures about Chinese medicine and the integration of Eastern and Western medicine.

The American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine offers two programs for those beginning careers in Chinese medicine – the Master of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine and the Doctorate in Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine. Students who are licensed or already practice in the field can pursue a Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine degree, while those seeking to bridge the gap between the master’s and doctoral programs can pursue the Transitional Doctorate.

Programs include instruction in acupuncture, herbal therapy, diet, massage, meditation and physical exercise.

Students intern at the college’s Acupuncture & Herbal Clinic, the Auricular Clinic and specialized clinical sites in the Bay area – including Lifelong Berkeley Primary Care, California Pacific Medical Center and the Center for Somatic Psychotherapy.

Students can also study abroad in China – two to six weeks at Zhejiang Chinese Medical University in Hangzhou or three months at Henan University.

The comprehensive Master of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine (MSTCM) degree program emphasizes hands-on clinical training as well as theories, medicinal uses of Chinese herbs, diagnostic skills and acupuncture technique. Full-time students can complete the program in 12 semesters over four years.

The First Professional Doctorate of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine degree incorporates the master’s curriculum with advanced training in integrative, patient-centered care and research literacy. The degree is designed for individuals who seek to enter the acupuncture and Chinese medical field at the doctoral level who do not have prior training in acupuncture and Chinese medicine. Students can complete the 192-unit program in four years.

The program includes clinical and didactic work in systems-based and integrative medicine and well as advanced study in auricular acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine oncology. The program also includes integrated medicine so graduates can collaborate with other healthcare providers. Students are conferred both the doctorate and a Master of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine concurrently at graduation.

Designed for licensed acupuncturists who want to focus on integrative medicine and specialize in pain management, the Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (DAOM) degree is open to those who have been practicing for more than 10 years or hold a master’s degree in oriental medicine. The program is designed for licensed acupuncturists who want to focus on integrative medicine, deepen their TCM skills and knowledge and specialize in TCM Pain Management or TCM Women’s Health.

Students can complete the 42.75-credit program in seven semesters with monthly classes from Friday to Monday. The program combines clinical and didactic hours for a total of 1,225 hours.

DAOM students also can take part in externships nationwide and in China. Students can apply their coursework toward the American Academy of Pain Management Credential. Students can complete the 21-unit transitional doctorate program in one year.

The Master in Traditional Chinese Medicine and the clinical Doctorate in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine hold accreditation from the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (ACAOM). The college also holds regional accreditation from the Western Association of Schools and Colleges.

Admission requirements: Master of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine and Doctorate in Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine program applicants must hold three years of undergraduate training. To apply to the Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine program, students must have graduated from an accredited program in Oriental Medicine or its foreign equivalent or have at least 10 years of documented experience, plus formal college training in Oriental medicine and acupuncture. Applicants to the Transitional Doctorate in Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine must hold a Master of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine from the American College of Traditional Chinese medicine.

5AOMA Graduate School of Integrative Medicine

(Austin, Texas)The AOMA Graduate School of Integrative Medicine

AOMA Graduate School of Integrative Medicine, founded in 1993 helps the community through partnerships with nonprofit organizations and through providing free and reduced-price treatments to people who cannot afford them. The school performs approximately 17,500 patient visits annually in its student and professional clinics. The school hosts the annual Southwest Symposium and offers continuing education opportunities. AOMA works with Western healthcare institutions, such as the Seton Healthcare Family.

AOMA offers Master and Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine degrees.

The Master of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (MAcOM) program consists of 200 credits or 2,898 hours and includes the study of acupuncture studies, biomedical sciences, herbal studies and mind-body/Asian bodywork therapy. Through observation and internship, students spend more than 900 hours on patient contact.

Full-time students can complete the MAcOM program in about four years. The school also offers accelerated and part-time options.

The Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (DAOM) program follows a modular format and combines on-campus residencies with independent study and research. Students can complete the program in two years.

The 74-credits/1,260-hour program includes the study of pain and psychological phenomena; principles of functional and nutritional medicine; neurological, sensory and dermatological pain; and eco-psycho-social pain.

Students spend 252 hours in an externship and 408 hours in an internship.

AOMA offers a study-abroad program in China. The program, offered every two years pending enrollment, is a collaboration with the Chengdu University of Traditional Oriental Medicine.

The school holds accreditation from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, Texas State Board of Acupuncture Examiners, and the California Acupuncture Board. The Master of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine and the Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine programs received accreditation from the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.

Admission requirements: Master’s degree applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree, or its equivalent, from an accredited institution with a minimum 2.5 grade point average in the last 60 hours of study. The school may consider applicants who have completed 90 baccalaureate-level semester credits. Transfer students must have completed at least 60 semester credits with a minimum overall grade point average of 2.5.

Doctoral candidates must hold a master’s degree from an ACAOM-accredited program, demonstrated scholastic achievement by a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in their graduate program and hold a current license – or be eligible to obtain a license – to practice acupuncture in Texas.

6Bastyr University

(Kenmore, Washington)Baster University, Kenmore, Washington

Bastyr University, founded in 1978, enrolls about 1,200 students. The university, which also has a campus in San Diego, CA, offers programs in acupuncture, nutrition, herbal medicine, midwifery and more. Bastyr University includes the Department of Acupuncture & East Asian Medicine and the School of Naturopathic Medicine.

The university’s degree options include combined Bachelor/Master of Science in Acupuncture, combined Bachelor/Master of Science in Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine, Master of Science in Acupuncture, Master of Science in Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine and Doctor of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine degrees. Students also can complete a certificate in Chinese Herbal Medicine.

The university’s comprehensive approach to Oriental medicine and acupuncture prepares students to work with Western medicine practitioners. Graduates can integrate Western and Eastern paradigms of medicine. Bastyr University also conducts research in oncology and integrative neuroscience.

All students complete a minimum of 400 patient contacts and 44 preceptor hours observing and shadowing acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine practitioners.

Students can complete clinical hours at the university’s teaching clinic — Bastyr Center for Natural Health in Seattle, as well as at community care clinics which provide care to immigrant communities, low-income residents and seniors.

Students who completed at least two years at the undergraduate level can earn their bachelor’s degree along with their Master’s in Acupuncture or Master’s in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.

The Master in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (MAOM) program includes the same classroom and clinical training as the Master’s in Acupuncture program as well as Chinese medical language and Chinese herbal medicine.

MAOM students complete 1,356 clinical training hours, while Master’s in Acupuncture students complete 828 hours. Master’s degree students can study abroad at one of Bastyr’s sister schools in Shanghai or Chengdu, China. Full-time students can complete the acupuncture program in about three years or the acupuncture and Oriental medicine program in about 3.5 years.

Master’s degree students can sit for the National Commission for the Certification of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine board exam.

The Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (DAOM) program allows students to deepen their understanding of Chinese medical classes and apply the treatment principles to clinical practice. The program integrates biomedical and Chinese medicine concepts with an emphasis on pain management.

The DAOM program consists of 1,218 hours didactic and clinical hours. Students complete their 650 clinical hours through hands-on internships, preceptors and clinical theory. Doctoral students also can choose to take part in a China externship. They also must complete a capstone project. Bastyr University offers the program in a weekend-intensive format over two years.

The university is a member of the Council of Colleges of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine and the American Association of Naturopathic Medical Colleges.

Bastyr University holds accreditation from the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.

The Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine program received accreditation from the Council on Naturopathic Medical Education. The Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine provides accreditation to the Master of Science in Acupuncture, Master of Science in Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine and Doctor of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine degree programs.

Admissions requirements: Applicants for the combined bachelor/master degree programs must hold 90 quarter credits with a minimum 2.75 grade point average and a grade “C” or better in all basic proficiency and science requirement classes.

Applicants for the master’s degree programs must hold a bachelor’s degree with a “C” or better in prerequisite course work and experience with acupuncture.

Doctoral applicants must hold a master’s degree or its equivalent from an accredited acupuncture school and be licensed in their home state or Washington state.

7Five Branches University

(Santa Cruz, California)Five Branches University

Five Branches University, founded in 1984, operates two campuses in California – in Santa Cruz and San Jose. The university provides programs related to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and integrative medicine. Five Braches University is known for its herbology department.

Designed for students interested in developing a practice focused on acupuncture – including licensed Western medical practitioners, the Master of Acupuncture (MAc) program includes academic and clinical training.

The university offers the master’s programs in English at both campuses. The three-year professional degree program consists of 2,256 hours and 119.25 units. Five Branches University offers the curriculum on a semester basis with clinical training during the summer term.

The MAc curriculum includes Traditional Chinese Medicine theory, herbology, acupuncture and clinical medicine; and Western medicine.

The MAc program prepares graduates to be primary healthcare providers with skills of four branches of Traditional Chinese Medicine: Tui Na massage, acupuncture, Chinese dietary medicine and energetics and the integrative components of Western medicine.

Students can complete clinical hours through externships at a variety of settings such as Highland Hospital in Oakland, Janus, Mental Health Client Action Network, a veteran’s clinic, a community clinic or a private practice.

Five Branches University also offers international externships at one of its five sister schools in Taiwan, China or Korea.

Master’s degree students also take part in a Career Development Fair to demonstrate their knowledge of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM).

The degree also fulfills requirements for the National Acupuncture Certification Exam.

Individuals who want to practice in California and are not licensed Western medical practitioners must complete the MTCM program, which includes Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture studies.

The Master in Traditional Chinese Medicine (MTCM) program includes coursework in the “five branches” of traditional Chinese medicine: Tui Na massage, herbology, acupuncture, Chinese dietary medicine and energetics. The program also incorporates Western medical studies, such as Western diagnosis and pharmaceuticals. MTCM students also can earn specialty certifications in Medical Qigong, Sports Medicine, Five Element Acupuncture and Tui Na Massage.

The dual-degree Doctor and Master of Traditional Chinese Medicine program, a four-year graduate professional degree program, consists of 3,435 hours and 195.5 units.

Students earn the doctoral degree and also receive the master’s degree needed to sit for licensing and certification exams. The university offers the program on a trimester basis in Chinese and English, but only the English program holds accreditation.

The program incorporates herbology, energetics, Chinese dietary medicine and acupuncture with components of Western medicine.

Students must perform at least 350 patient treatments during clinical training. Students can complete a portion of their clinical hours through externships in private practice or community clinic settings. The university also offers study abroad options at five sister schools in Taiwan, China and Korea.

Five Branches University also offers a Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine program, designed for licensed acupuncturists seeking to develop advanced skills in traditional Chinese medicine and earn a medical specialization. The university offers the 1,280-hour program at its San Jose campus in English and Chinese.

The Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine program consists of 582 didactic hours and 698 clinical hours.

Five Branches University offers the courses during monthly three to four day weekend intensives with a flexible clinical training schedule.

Students can complete the DAOM program in 24 months.

The doctoral program includes the Western and Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective of a TCM practice.

Students can complete clinical training in the university’s health centers, community clinics and hospitals affiliated with its sister colleges in China.

Students also complete a capstone project.

Doctoral students can tailor the degree to their personal and professional goals through completing a specialization in Neuromuscular Medicine and Pain Management, Women’s Health and Endocrinology, Auricular Medicine or Cerebro-Cardiovascular Disease.

Upon completing the program, students can opt to attend an extra year of study – partially in China — to earn a Ph.D. from one of the university’s sister colleges: Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine or Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

The university operates clinics in San Jose and Santa Cruz.

Five Branches University has received accreditation from the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.
Admission requirements: Master’s degree candidates must have completed 90 semester credits of general education from a regionally accredited institution with at least a 2.75 grade point average. Doctoral candidates must hold a master’s degree in Traditional Chinese Medicine or Oriental Medicine from an accredited program.

8Maryland University of Integrative Health

(Laurel, Maryland)Maryland University of Integrative Health

Founded in 1974 as an acupuncture clinic, the acupuncture school established in 1981. Maryland University of Integrative Health (MUHI) offers programs in acupuncture and Oriental medicine, health and wellness coaching, herbal medicine, nutrition and integrative health, health promotion, and Yoga Therapy.

The university offers degrees such as Master of Oriental Medicine, Master of Acupuncture, Doctor of Oriental Medicine and Doctor of Acupuncture.

The university also offers integrative health consultations and treatment in its Natural Care Center.

Both the Master of Acupuncture and the Master of Oriental Medicine programs combine classroom teaching with clinical experience. The Oriental Medicine curriculum also integrates a concentration in the study of Chinese herbs.

Master’s degree students develop an understanding of the classical and theoretical foundations of acupuncture and Oriental medicine with a focus on the Eight Principle treatment strategies and the Constitutional Five Element Acupuncture tradition. Students also receive instruction in biomedicine from a holistic and integrative perspective.

The flexible, full-time format consists of two days each week with occasional intensives, online courses, and electives. Students complete 250 treatments in the Natural Care Center. Oriental Medicine students also complete 210 hours in the Chinese Herbs clinic.

Acupuncture students also can specialize in a clinical area such as women’s health or pain management or choose to deepen their understanding of Constitutional Five Element Acupuncture.

The Doctor of Acupuncture program provides students with a foundation in practice management as well as an understanding of the theoretical and classical foundations of Oriental medicine and acupuncture, and biomedicine from a holistic perspective.

The Doctor of Oriental Medicine degree program integrates the Doctor of Acupuncture curriculum with a concentration in Chinese herbs.

Both first-professional doctoral programs build on the competencies of the Master of Oriental Medicine program in addition to 28 doctoral-specific competencies, including systems-based medicine, research literacy and enhanced clinical training.

Students can enter with a bachelor’s degree and complete the doctorate in four years and four months. They also can earn their master’s degree while completing the doctorate program.

The hybrid programs include on-campus and online courses.

Students train at the on-campus clinic and off-campus community clinics. They also must pass a comprehensive exam, complete 310 treatments, and a research paper. Students in the Doctor of Oriental Medicine program also must complete 210 hours in the Chinese herb clinic.

The university also offers post-baccalaureate certificates in Chinese herbs and medical herbalism.

Maryland University of Integrative Health holds accreditation from the Middle States Commission on Higher Education.

The university’s Master of Acupuncture program and the Master of Oriental Medicine program have received accreditation from the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.

Admissions requirements: All applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution.

9 Northwestern Health Sciences University

(Bloomington, Minnesota)Northwestern Health Sciences University

Northwestern Health Sciences University, a private, non-profit university, enrolls about 870 students. Founded in 1941 as Northwestern College of Chiropractic, the university added acupuncture, Oriental medicine and massage programs in 1999.

The university is home to two colleges – Chiropractic, and Health and Wellness. The university offers a host of degree and certificate options including human biology, acupuncture, Oriental medicine and therapeutic massage.

The school emphasizes clinical training, hands-on skill building as well as a foundation in Eastern tradition and modern science. The school provides one clinical faculty member for every three interns. The core faculty members are from China or studied with masters in China.

The Master of Acupuncture program includes training in cultural foundations of traditional Chinese medicine, point location, acupuncture treatment principles, Tui Na and biomedical clinical sciences.

Students also complete 150 hours of observation/assistantship and 525 hours of supervised clinical practice.

Students can complete the Master’s degree in Acupuncture program in eight trimesters.

The Master of Oriental Medicine program, similar to the acupuncture program, includes instruction in traditional Chinese herbal medicine and herbal dispensary management. The program includes a clinical herbal internship.

Students must complete 150 hours of observation/assistantship and 720 hours of supervised clinical practice.

Students can complete the Master’s degree in Oriental Medicine program in nine trimesters.

Students gain clinical training experience performing treatments on the public at one of the university’s clinical internship sites, such as Abbott Northeastern Hospital – Penny George Institute for Health and Healing, Regions Hospital, University of Minnesota, Woodwinds Hospital, Pathways Minneapolis, Salvation Army Harbor Light Natural Care Center, the Aliveness Project and, Cerenity Senior Care Center.

The Wolfe-Harris Center for Clinical Studies serves as the university’s complementary and alternative medicine clinical research division.

The university also offers an herbal medicine certificate.

Students can enroll in either master’s degree program in January or September.

Northwestern Health Sciences University holds accreditation from the Higher Learning Commission. Its Master in Acupuncture and Master in Oriental Medicine degree programs also received accreditation from the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (ACAOM).

Admission requirements: Applicants must hold at least 60 semester credits from an accredited institution with a minimum 2.5 grade point average.

10Pacific College of Oriental Medicine-San Diego

(San Diego, California)Pacific College of Oriental Medicine San Diego

Pacific College of Oriental Medicine San Diego (PCOM-SD), founded in 1986, provides students training in an integrative medicine approach, learning from Eastern and Western medicine theories and practices. The college also has campuses in New York City and Chicago. The college has received research grants from the National Institutes of Health and Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute.

Students receive training at the professional acupuncture clinic which includes an herbal dispensary. Students have the opportunity to gain experience through off-site externships, located at hospitals, clinics, and designated treatment sites. Students have opportunities to treat the general public during various health and wellness events. Students also have access to an extensive library of Oriental Medicine.

Pacific College students receive instruction in traditional Oriental medical theory and techniques, herbal medicine, Tui Na, and acupuncture points and meridians, as well as pharmacology, nutrition and anatomy.

Students also can enroll in the college’s massage programs and earn a massage license while pursuing a master’s or doctorate in acupuncture.

The Master of Science in Traditional Oriental Medicine (MSTOM) program combines Asian medicine with a foundation in Western medicine. The four-year program consists of 191.5 units and 3,510 credit hours of clinical practice and theory. Courses include: acupuncture points, anatomy and physiology, herbology, Eastern nutrition and auricular acupuncture.

Graduates can sit for the California, state licensure exams and national certification exams.

Pacific College also offers a doctoral completion program for alumni of its master’s degree programs to receive an entry-level Doctor of Acupuncture (DAc) or Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (DAOM) degree.

Course topics include evidence-informed practice, collaborative care, systems-based medicine and advanced integrative diagnostics.

The Post-Graduate Doctor of Oriental Medicine and Acupuncture program consists of 1,257.5 hours and 63.5 credits over six semesters.

Students must complete 21 units of clinical courses.

Course topics include family medicine, application of Chinese classics and evidence-based medicine.

The college also offers a certificate in Chinese herbology, which students can complete in six semesters.

Pacific College of Oriental Medicine holds accreditation from the WASC Senior College and University Commission. The Master of Science in Traditional Oriental Medicine and the Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine programs received accreditation from the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.

Admission requirements: Master’s degree applicants must hold an associate’s degree or at least 60 semester credits from an accredited institution. Doctoral program applicants must hold a master’s degree or completed a master’s-level program in Oriental medicine or acupuncture from an accredited institution, earned at least a 3.0 grade point average and hold an acupuncture license.

11American College of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine

(Houston, Texas)American College of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine

Founded in 1991, the American College of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine (ACAOM) offers master’s programs in acupuncture and Oriental medicine, integrative healthcare leadership and integrative wellness management, a doctorate in acupuncture and Oriental medicine as well as a certificate in Chinese herbal medicine. ACAOM integrates Western and Eastern medicine to provide students with a strong background in holistic medicine and natural health.

The college has six sister schools in Taiwan and China and collaborates with Houston Methodist Hospital Healthcare System. The college also operates a clinic, which treats about 1,000 patients each month.

The 163-semester-credit Master in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine program consists of didactic courses and clinical training. Course topics include herbology, tai chi, Tui Na, biomedical sciences and integrated medicine studies.

Students can complete the program in four years. The college offers most courses in the evening, and clinical training during weekdays and Saturdays.

The 60-semester-credit Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine program provides students with extensive knowledge in the classics of Oriental medicine and acupuncture.

The program features courses in herbal medicine, research methodology and acupuncture as well as specialized training in herbal medicine and acupuncture as it relates to gynecology.

Students take part in clinical internships and rotations as well as dissertation and research.

ACAOM offers the program in a modular format with courses one weekend per month.

Students can complete the program in two years.

The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges provides accreditation to the American College of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine. The Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine also provides accreditation to the college’s Master of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine program.

Admissions requirements: Master’s degree applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree or its equivalent from an accredited college or university with an undergraduate grade point average of 2.5 or a 3.0 grade point average in the last 60 semester hours.

Doctoral applicants must hold a master’s degree in Oriental medicine or acupuncture from an accredited college with at least a 3.0 grade point average.

12Atlantic Institute of Oriental Medicine

(Ft. Lauderdale, Florida)Atlantic Institute of Oriental Medicine, Ft Lauderdale, Florida

Founded in 1994, the Atlantic Institute of Oriental Medicine (ATOM) offers a Master’s in Oriental Medicine program and a Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine as well as continuing education programs. ATOM’s clinically based curriculum provides students with a biomedical foundation they can apply to Oriental medical practice. Most of the instructors have backgrounds in both Western and Traditional Chinese Medicine. Most of the DAOM visiting, adjunct faculty have backgrounds in TCM and Western medicine. Most of them have senior positions with TCM educational institutions in China.

The Master in Oriental Medicine program includes Western and Eastern medicine topics such as internal diseases of traditional Chinese medicine, scalp acupuncture and Western pathology. The program consists of 3,232 hours and 183.47 credit hours. Offered on a trimester system, students can complete the program in about four years.

Students complete a clinical practicum.

The university offers day and evening classes three or four days each week with a flexible schedule for clinic internships.

Graduates can sit for the Florida licensure exam and the national certification exam.

Students can apply a portion of the master’s-level curriculum toward a bachelor’s degree in health sciences. The university confers both degrees at the completion of the four-year master’s degree program.

Designed for Oriental medicine professionals and acupuncturists, the Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine program includes training in advanced clinical intervention, advanced patient assessment, consultation skills and clinical supervision.

The professional doctoral program consists of 1,236 hours – 576 didactic hours and 660 clinical hours – over two years.

The curriculum includes courses in acupuncture, pediatrics and therapeutic manipulation as well as gastroenterology and neurology – from biomedical and TCM perspectives. Students also complete a capstone project.

The university offers monthly classes from Friday to Monday. The classes are in English.
Doctoral students attend a one-day training experience at the Miami Anatomical Research Center’s cadaver lab and complete an internship with doctors at the ATOM Student Clinic.

ATOM and the International Education College of Shanghai University of Traditional Chinses Medicine (IECSHUTCM) have an articulation agreement which provides students in ATOM’s DAOM program the opportunity to pursue the IECSHUTCM Ph.D. program in Traditional Chinses Medicine.

Students have the opportunity to complete an apprenticeship with healthcare professionals.

The university operates the ATOM Intern Clinic and has an affiliation with the Light of the World Clinic.

The Florida Commission for Independent Education has licensed Atlantic Institute of Oriental Medicine to confer degrees.

The institute’s professional Master of Oriental Medicine program and the Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine program have received accreditation from the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.

Admission requirements: Master’s degree applicants must hold at least 60 semester credits, including 19 hours in general education/liberal arts subjects. Doctoral program applicants must hold a master’s degree or have completed a master’s-level program in Oriental medicine from an accredited program.

13Pacific College of Oriental Medicine-New York

(New York, New York)Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, New York, New York

Pacific College of Oriental Medicine New York, provides students training in an integrative medicine approach, learning from Eastern and Western medicine theories and practices.

Students obtain training at the professional acupuncture clinic which has an herbal dispensary. Students can gain experience through off-site externships, located at hospitals, clinics, and designated treatment sites. The college also provides an extensive library of Oriental Medicine.

The Master of Science in Traditional Oriental Medicine (MSTOM) program combines Asian medicine with a foundation in Western medicine. The four-year program consists of 191.5 units and 3,510 credit hours of clinical practice and theory.

MSTOM program courses include: acupuncture points, anatomy and physiology, herbology, Eastern nutrition, and auricular acupuncture.

The Master in Acupuncture degree program focuses on acupuncture and Oriental medicine to achieve health and well-being. Students choose to focus on either traditional or classical Oriental medicine.

The three or four-year program consists of 172.5 units or 3,232.5 credit hours of theory and practice.

Courses include: anatomy and physiology, Tui Na hand and structural techniques, needle technique, and auricular acupuncture.
Graduates can sit for the New York state licensure exam and national certification exams.

The Master of Science in Traditional Oriental Medicine and the Master in Acupuncture programs received accreditation from the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.

Admission requirements: Master’s degree applicants must hold an associate’s degree or at least 60 semester credits from an accredited institution.

14Tri-State College of Acupuncture

(New York, New York)tri-state-college-of-acupuncture-boost

Established in 1979, Tri-State College of Acupuncture integrates classical traditions and modern approaches in acupuncture training and provides continuing education for biomedical professionals and acupuncturists. The college offers Master of Science in Acupuncture and Master of Science in Oriental Medicine degrees as well as a Chinese herbology certificate program.

Tri-State College of Acupuncture serves the public through its partnerships with community health centers and hospitals as well as acupuncture and Chinese herbal clinics.

The three-year Master in Acupuncture program provides students with hands-on training in three styles of acupuncture – Traditional Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture Physical Medicine and Japanese Acupuncture.

Designed to provide students with a well-rounded education in classical Chinese medicine, the curriculum emphasizes the meridian perspective and the use of palpation for treatment and diagnosis with training in qi gong, cupping and gua sha. Students also gain an integrated perspective through courses in Western biomedical theory.

Students take part in clinical practice classes, where they give and receive treatments, and work in the college’s on-site Community Clinic. They also complete a clinical internship.

Students develop a comprehensive business plan and take courses in business, ethics and legal issues.

The 114.1 credit/2,196-hour program prepares students for the NCCAOM national board exams and licensure in New Jersey, New York and Connecticut.

The college limits program enrollment to 55 students per year.

The four-year Master in Oriental Medicine program combines the acupuncture program with 810 hours of training in botany, Chinese herbology and nutrition.

Most students complete the Masters in Acupuncture, transfer into the Oriental Medicine program with advanced standing and complete an herbal clinical internship and Chinese herbology courses.

Students who hold a master’s level degree in acupuncture from another accredited institution can take the 810-hour course and earn the Advanced Certificate in Chinese Herbology.

The Oriental Medicine program allows students advanced study in gynecology, dermatology, and musculoskeletal and channel dysfunction. The curriculum includes Asian dietary theory, Western and Eastern nutrition, and classical theories and texts.

Students complete an internship in the college’s Herbal Community Clinic and present complex clinical cases.

Admissions requirements: Applicants must hold an associate’s degree – or 60 semester credits — from an accredited institution with a minimum 2.5 grade point average.

Tri-State College of Acupuncture also offers a Postgraduate Clinical Affiliations Program, which allows licensed graduates the chance to work in community-based health programs throughout New York City. Externs take part in a six-month acupuncture rotation and receive educational seminars via conference call.

Students can earn continuing education credits through the tuition-free program.

Master in Acupuncture and the Master in Oriental Medicine programs hold accreditation from the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.

15Texas Health and Science University

(Austin, Texas)Texas Health and Science University

Texas Health and Science University, founded in 1990, offers programs in acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine, business, and English as a Second Language. The university also has a branch campus in San Antonio and operates Student Intern and Professional clinics in Austin as well as the Acupuncture Health Clinic in San Antonio.

Texas Health and Science University has several sister schools in China and Taiwan and offers a dual degree program with Zhejiang Chinese Medical University.

Through its College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, students can pursue Bachelor in Traditional Chinese Medicine, Master in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, a combined Master in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine and Master of Business Administration or MBA in Healthcare Management, and Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine degrees.

All students must treat at least 350 patients in the university’s Student Intern Clinic.

The Bachelor in Traditional Chinese Medicine program, open to students who have completed general education requirements at another school, includes courses in Chinese terminology and phonetics, point location, biomedical concepts and Western medical history, reflexology and herbology.

Students transfer at least 60 credits and complete 70 credits/1,125 hours at Texas Health. Students must complete the program in six trimesters.

The Master’s in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine degree program includes courses in Qi Gong, herbology, diagnosis, and anatomy and physiology.

Students also complete more than 700 clinical internship hours.

Students must complete internship hours and coursework in 15 trimesters.

The university also offers a combined Master in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine and Master of Business Administration or MBA in Healthcare Management. The program prepares graduates to manage their own clinics.

Acupuncture program classes meet weekdays, while the MBA program classes meet Saturdays.

The Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Program provides students with advanced integrative study in pain management.

Students attend classes four days – an intensive weekend – each month for 28 months.

The 59-credit-hour – 1,230-clock-hour – doctoral program consists of 28 modules and includes courses in Western medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, integrative medicine and specialty case studies.

Clinical training includes collaboration, supervision and internship.

Doctoral students also complete a capstone project.

The Dual Master’s degree in Traditional Chinese Medicine – offered in partnership with the International Education College at Zhejiang Chinese Medical University in Zhejiang, China – features instruction and clinical hours in the U.S. and China.

The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board authorized Texas Health and Science University to award the Master of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine degree.

The university received accreditation from the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools to award master’s degrees and bachelor’s degrees. Texas Health and Science University’s Master’s in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine degree program also received accreditation from the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.

Admissions requirements: Applicants should have 60 semester credits in general education with a minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average.

Doctoral applicants must hold a master’s degree in Oriental medicine from an accredited school with at least 2,770 clock hours.

16American Academy of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine

(Roseville, Minnesota)American Academy of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine

The American Academy of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine (AAAOM), founded 1997, offers master and doctoral degrees in acupuncture and Oriental Medicine as well as a certificate in massage. Instruction combines fundamental concepts of Western biomedicine and Chinese medicine with an emphasis in the integration of traditional healing practices and Western medicine.

AAAOM has one of the largest TCM libraries in the country. The faculty has jointly published more than 600 articles, books and studies. AAAOM reports to have more than 20 doctoral faculty members. The school also has an extensive clinic network to serve patients in the community.

The academy is affiliated with several medical schools in China, such as its sister school, the Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Jinan, China. Advanced students can continue their studies there at the Ph.D. level or take part in certificate programs. Students also can study or take part in observation at Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine and the China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Beijing.

Students develop skills in herbal medicine, medical Tui Na massage, dietary therapy, acupuncture, tai chi and qi gong as well as clinical skills through observation and internship.

The 182-credit Master of Science in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (MSAOM) degree emphasizes Chinese herbology and acupuncture.

Students complete 1,740 hours of didactic instruction, 900 hours of clinical observation and training, and 540 hours of bioscience-related material. Students must complete at least 360 treatments and see at least 72 patients.

Students can choose to develop skills in one of these areas of traditional Chinese medicine: Geriatrics, pediatrics, internal medicine, musculo-skeletal disorders, gynecology, neurological disorders, dermatology or sensory organ disorders.

Courses include tai chi, meridians, microbiology, Clinical Chinese herbology and Western medical pathology.

Full-time students can earn the MSAOM degree in 12 trimesters. The school also offers part-time and accelerated options. Designed to prepare graduates to practice traditional Chinese medicine, the 62-credit Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (DAOM) program allows students to develop an understanding of health conditions from the perspective of Western and traditional Chinese medicine.

The 1,260-hour DAOM program emphasizes traditional Chinese medicine neurology, orthopedics, gynecology, oncology and psychiatry.

Doctoral students attend classes Friday to Monday every four weeks for two years.

Students must complete a capstone research project and 660 hours of clinical practicum/training on-campus or at off-campus clinics.

The Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine provides accreditation to the American Academy of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine’s Master of Science in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine program.

Admissions requirements: Master’s degree program applicants must hold at least 60 semester credits at the baccalaureate level, or its equivalent. Doctoral program applicants must hold a master’s degree, or its equivalent, in acupuncture and Oriental medicine from an accredited institution with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5.

17New York College of Traditional Chinese Medicine

(Mineola, New York)New York College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Mineola, NY

New York College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, founded in 1996, offers degree programs in acupuncture, Oriental medicine and Chinese herbology as well as a medical Qigong practitioner certificate program. Most of the faculty obtained their training in China and have extensive teaching and clinical experience in China and the United States. The college provides small classes.

The college operates a Teaching Clinic, which offers care to the community and a clinical internship site for students. The college has acupuncture clinics on Long Island and in Manhattan.

New York College of Traditional Chinese Medicine offers most classes on weekends.

The three-year Master in Acupuncture program consists of three strands of courses – acupuncture, Traditional Chinese Medicine and Western biomedical sciences.

The 141-credit program’s curriculum includes theories of Chinese physiology based on the five elements and Yin and Yang, meridians and point location, medical terminology, Western diagnosis and pharmacology.

Students must complete courses in massage, Eastern nutrition, energy work, herbology, and professional ethics. Acupuncture students complete 720 clinical training hours through observation, assistantship and internship.

The college’s four-year Master in Oriental Medicine degree program is similar to the Acupuncture program with an additional strand of courses in Chinese Herbology.

The 184-credit curriculum includes courses in Chinese herbal classics, toxicity and safe use of herbs.

Oriental Medicine students complete 900 clinical training hours through observation, assistantship and internship – including preparing formulas in the herbal pharmacy.

The master’s programs prepare graduates for licensure and practice in New York.

Designed for licensed acupuncturists and those with acupuncture degrees, the Chinese Herbology Certificate Program consists of 510 hours of didactic courses and 360 hours of clinical training over five trimesters.

The New York College of Traditional Chinese Medicine’s Master’s degree in Acupuncture program and Master’s degree in Oriental Medicine programs received accreditation from the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (ACAOM).

Admissions requirements: Applicants must have completed 60 undergraduate credits from an accredited institution with a minimum 2.5 grade point average.

18National College of Natural Medicine

(Portland, Oregon)ncnm

Established in 1956, the National College of Natural Medicine is the oldest accredited naturopathic medical college in the nation. The college offers programs in classical Chinese medicine, naturopathic medicine, integrative mental health, integrative medicine research, and nutrition.

The college operates several natural medicine clinics, a medicinary, a laboratory, and the Helfgott Research Institute.

Through the School of Classical Chinese Medicine, students can pursue a Master of Science in Oriental Medicine or a Doctor of Science in Oriental Medicine, which incorporates the master’s program.

Both programs emphasize a “scholar-practitioner” educational style and provide students with a holistic education in Western medicine, classical foundations and training in the clinical applications of Chinese medicine.

The 3,474-hour/ 226-credit Master of Science in Oriental Medicine (MSOM) degree includes courses in acupuncture, body work, nutrition and qigong.

Students can complete the MSOM program in four years. (Students also can enroll in the Master’s in Oriental Medicine and Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine programs concurrently and finish in six years.)

Master’s degree students complete clinical observation hours and a clinical internship.

During the four-year Doctor of Science in Oriental Medicine program, students can fulfill master’s degree competencies and learn to apply ancient knowledge in today’s healthcare system.

The doctoral program emphasizes the application of biomedical knowledge within whole-systems science. Students take part in weekend qigong retreats and complete a capstone project. Doctoral graduates also receive their Master in Oriental Medicine degree.

The National College of Natural Medicine received accreditation from the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities. The college’s Master of Science in Oriental Medicine degree holds accreditation from the Accreditation Commission or Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. The California Board of Acupuncture and the New Mexico Board of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine approved the college’s programs.

Admissions requirements: All applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree or higher from an accredited institution.

19Seattle Institute of Oriental Medicine

(Seattle, Washington)Seattle Institute of Oriental Medicine, Seattle, Washington

The Seattle Institute of Oriental Medicine, founded in 1994, believes in providing small class sizes with hands-on supervision and clinical experience with experienced practitioners in a diverse range of styles along with exposure to medical Chinese language to provide an education in East-Asian medicine. In their first year students assist experienced practitioners every week in the care of patients. The faculty includes instructors trained in approaches from mainland China, Japan, Taiwan and Europe as well as modern and ancient acupuncture and herbal strategies.

Seattle Institute of Oriental Medicine offers Master’s degrees in acupuncture, and acupuncture and oriental medicine, and a Doctor of Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine degree.

The institute operates acupuncture and Chinese herb clinics, acupuncture clinics, massage clinics, faculty clinics and the Greenlake Community Acupuncture Clinic.

The Seattle Institute of Oriental Medicine accepts about 14 students each year into its program.

During their first year of study, students receive a broad foundation in East-Asian medicine – allowing them to make an informed decision as to whether to focus on acupuncture therapies (Master of Acupuncture degree) or acupuncture and herbal therapies (Master of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine degree).

Regardless of the chosen degree option, the curriculum focuses on clinical practice and a deepened understanding of the biomedical perspective of diseases.

Learning in the Master of Acupuncture degree program includes the technical aspect of techniques as well as clinical practice and demonstration of the basic skills for assessment, diagnosis, treatment and referral.

Individuals pursuing the Master’s degree in acupuncture and Oriental medicine receive training in integrated clinics combining acupuncture and herbal medicine. They receive instruction in Chinese herbs, Chinese medical language and Chinese medical classes. They also have weekly clinical preceptorships and help in the herbal dispensary.

All students complete clinical internships in community clinics, drug treatment centers or other facilities.

Students can earn the Master’s degree in Acupuncture in three years; the Master’s in Oriental Medicine and the Doctor of Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine require an additional year.

Doctoral students hone their clinical and communication skills. They also will work with mentors selected by the student and approved by the school.

Designed to prepare graduates for careers as clinicians and educators, the Doctor of Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine program emphasizes clinical specialties, research activities, teaching experience and advanced clinical practice.

The Seattle Institute of Oriental Medicine’s Master in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine and Master in Acupuncture degree programs hold accreditation from the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.

The Washington State Department of Health recognizes the institute as an approved college of acupuncture and Oriental medicine.

Admissions requirements: Master’s degree applicants must have at least three years of study at the baccalaureate level with a minimum 3.0 grade point average.

20Finger Lakes School of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine of New York Chiropractic College

(Seneca Falls, New York)finger

New York Chiropractic College, founded in 1919, offers master’s degrees in acupuncture, and acupuncture and Oriental medicine through the Finger Lakes School of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine. The campus features a hands-on anatomy lab, an herb garden and dispensary lab.

Designed to prepare graduates for professional clinical practice, the programs provide students with a foundation in Oriental medicine traditions combined with biomedicine instruction.

The 120-credit Master in Acupuncture degree program consists of 2,265 contact hours with didactic and clinical elements.

The curriculum includes instruction in acupuncture, anatomy, Tui Na, nutrition, Tai Ji Chuan, moxibustion, and breathing techniques.

Students complete clinical observation and assistantship as well as a year-long clinical internship.

The 164-credit Master in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine program consists of 3,060 contact hours.

The Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine program includes the Anatomy degree curriculum as well as herbal medicine courses. Students also complete practical training in herb preparation and herb dispensary management.

All students take part in 105 hours of clinical training at various sites, including at the Veteran’s Administration Hospital in Canandaigua, the Campus Health Center and the Seneca Falls Health Center.

The college also offers a China Abroad Program. The two-week course combines didactic and clinical training at the Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Hangzhou, China.

The New York State Education Department of the State University of New York registered New York Chiropractic College’s master degree programs in acupuncture and Oriental medicine.

The Middle States Commission on Higher Education provides accreditation to New York Chiropractic College. The school received accreditation from the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine for its Master in Acupuncture and Master in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine programs.

Admission requirements: Applicants must hold at least 90 semester hours of college credit – including nine credits of bioscience coursework – from an accredited institution with at least a 2.0 grade point average in the bioscience courses and a 2.5 cumulative GPA.

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The Illegal and Unsafe Practice of Acupuncture 

 

Under the Term “Dry Needling”,

 

10 Facts You Should Know

 

Here are 10 facts you should know about the illegal and unsafe practice of acupuncture under the term “dry needling:”

1. “Dry needling” is acupuncture.

“Dry needling” was first described over 2,000 years ago in China’s earliest and most comprehensive extant medical treatise, the Yellow Emperor’s Inner Classic (Huangdi neijing), where it discusses in detail using tender or painful points, also known as “trigger points” or “motor points,” to treat pain and dysfunction, particularly of the neuromusculoskeletal system. Simply described, “dry needling” involves inserting an acupuncture needle into a tender or painful point and then appropriately manipulating (rotating and/or pistoning) it for therapeutic purposes.

 

2. Tender or painful points, also known as “trigger points” or “motor points,” are acupuncture points.

Tender or painful points are located in muscles and connective tissues, and, as their name suggests, are identified through tenderness or pain on palpation. This was, in fact, one of acupuncture’s earliest forms of point selection. China’s preeminent physician, Sun Si-Miao (581–682 C.E.), called these tender or painful points “ashi” points. In Chinese, ashi means Ah yes!(That’s the right spot.). So, when the tender or painful point is pressed, the patient feels an unexpected local and/or referred “wince-pain” and says Ah yes! That’s the right spot. Incidentally, in a 1977 study published in Pain (the official journal of the International Association for the Study of Pain), Melzack, Stillwell and Fox established that “every trigger point [reported in the Western medical literature] has a corresponding acupuncture point.”* A number of studies subsequently published in the Western medical literature have reached this same basic conclusion.

 

* Source: Melzack R, Stillwell DM, Fox EJ. Trigger points and acupuncture points for pain: correlations and implications. Pain. 1977 Feb;3(1):3–23.

 

3. “Dry needling” is not “manual therapy;” it is acupuncture.

It is important to emphasize that “dry needling” is an invasive, acupuncture needle intervention (that is, it is acupuncture, a specialized form of minimally invasive surgery), whereas manual therapy is a noninvasive, hands-on intervention (for example, massage, mobilization/manipulation). Manual therapy certainly does not include the practice of surgery in any form.

 

4. “Dry needling” is not a “technique;” it is acupuncture.

To make clear, the act of inserting an acupuncture needle into the body, under any pretense, or for any purpose whatsoever, is the practice of acupuncture.

 

5. Physical therapists and other allied health professionals who are not licensed by law to practice acupuncture cannot legally purchase acupuncture needles.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) classified acupuncture needles as Class II medical devices subject to strict regulations under the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FDCA) and FDA’s regulations. Individuals purchasing or receiving acupuncture needles who are not licensed by law to practice acupuncture are directly violating both civil and criminal provisions of the FDCA intended to protect public safety. 21 U.S.C. § 331(a)–(c), (g). These include the FDA’s requirements that acupuncture needles can only be sold to “qualified practitioners of acupuncture.” 61 Fed. Reg. 64616 (December 6, 1996). FDA prescription labeling requirements themselves specifically prohibit the sale of acupuncture needles to anyone who is not a qualified practitioner of acupuncture. The required FDA prescription labeling on the package from which acupuncture needles are to be dispensed states: “Caution: Federal law restricts this device to sale by or on the order of qualified practitioners of acupuncture as determined by the States.” 21 CFR § 801.109(b)(1) (emphasis added). Any individual who is not licensed by law to practice acupuncture is directly violating the FDCA and FDA’s civil and criminal prohibitions when they purchase or receive acupuncture needles for use in “dry needling.”

 

6. Physical therapists and other allied health professionals who are not licensed by law to practice acupuncture are using acupuncture needles to perform “dry needling.”

Physical therapists and other allied health professionals who are not licensed by law to practice acupuncture would have you believe that they are not using acupuncture needles to perform “dry needling,” when they are, in fact, using acupuncture needles, which are clearly labeled as such on the dispensing package.

 

7. Physical therapists and other allied health professionals who are not licensed by law to practice acupuncture are not qualified to perform “dry needling.”

“Dry needling” is far outside both physical therapists’ and other allied health professionals’ scope of practice and their scope of education and training. In most states, to become a licensed acupuncturist, an applicant must complete a minimum of 1,905 hours of education and supervised clinical training (1,245 hours of education and 660 hours of supervised clinical training). Yet physical therapists and other allied health professionals who are not licensed by law to practice acupuncture are inserting acupuncture needles (up to four inches or more in length) into unsuspecting patients with as little as a weekend workshop in acupuncture.

 

8. There are real risks associated with the use of acupuncture needles by physical therapists and other allied health professionals who lack the education and supervised clinical training of licensed acupuncturists.

These real risks include, but are not limited to, blood vessel, nerve and organ injury from inappropriate acupuncture needle angle and depth of insertion or from inappropriate acupuncture needle manipulation; and infection and cross infection from nonsterile acupuncture needles, poor hygiene in acupuncture needle handling, and inadequate skin preparation.

 

9. There have been recently reported cases of injury or harm from the use of acupuncture needles by physical therapists and other allied health professionals who lack the education and supervised clinical training of licensed acupuncturists.

In one such case, Emily Kuykendall, a high school teacher from Maryland, had suffered nerve damage from the use of acupuncture needles by a physical therapist. In another such case, Kim Ribble-Orr, a former Olympic athlete from Canada, had suffered a punctured lung and a pneumothorax (the presence of air in the cavity between the lungs and the chest wall, causing collapse of the lung) from the use of acupuncture needles by a massage therapist.

*If you or someone you know has suffered injury or harm from the use of acupuncture needles by a physical therapist or other allied health professional who lacked the education and supervised clinical training of licensed acupuncturists, we want to hear from you. Our phone number is 775-301-5255.

 

10. It is illegal for physical therapists or any other providers to submit claims for payment to Medicare for “dry needling” (a non-covered service) as “physical therapy” (a covered service).

Since “dry needling” is acupuncture, it is not a covered service. Use of acupuncture needles is not a covered service, whether an acupuncturist or any other provider renders the service. 42 U.S.C. § 1395y(a)(1). Its billing under Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes 97112 (neuromuscular reeducation) or 97140 (manual therapy techniques) is a misrepresentation of the actual service rendered and is considered fraud by Medicare. 31 U.S.C. §§ 3729–3733.

*If you suspect Medicare fraud, call the Medicare Fraud Hotline at 1-800-HHS-TIPS (1-800-447-8477). TTY users should call 1-800-377-4950.

*Information on this page is used with consent from the National Center for Acupuncture Safety and Integrity

http://www.acupuncturesafety.org/10Facts

 

 

 

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To date, there are 1,035 active acupuncturists in MD. Acupuncture Today indicated the members in Maryland is 752(72.6%). And currently VA active acupuncturists  about 485. In Acupuncture Today, is 352(72.6%).

Total acupuncturists in Acupuncture Today is about 25,000. So in 2014, actual active acupuncturists in USA should be 34,435.

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中医针灸在美国第一个州的立法经过

作者:祝君平安  于 2013-4-6 12:30 发表于 最热闹的华人社交网络–贝壳村

中国针灸医学近百年来的发展很快,水准也越来越高,主要原因是疗效优良。当今西洋医学面临着2个大问题:一个是药物治疗后引起的毒害性,另一个是手术治疗后引起的后遗症。还有很多疾病,西洋医学只有诊断而没有治法的。

现代的医学家极力寻找不杀伤性的、温和的新治疗方法。进入20世纪70年代,中医针灸终于成为他们的研究对象,在西洋医学最先进的美国第一个州———内华达(简称内州)就率先立法承认中医针灸的医学地位。

1.内州立法前美国中医针灸发展概述

美国立国200多年,直到20世纪70年代,对中医针灸并不重视。但在华人社区中,尤其是在洛杉矶、三藩市、纽约、华盛顿,中医针灸仍是华人治病的主流。美国人民也喜欢游唐人街,其中的中药店、凉茶铺很多。有人还会去尝试接受治疗,因此,小部份美国人对中医针灸并不陌生。

1947年,美国西医师公会在ATLANTIC城召开医学大会,有医生报道中医针灸的疗效,可惜人数太少,未得到重视。1949年,JOHNSHOPKINS大学研究生ILZAVEITH把《内经》译成英文,在序言中赞许中国医学的防病治病理论,这书后来再被译成意大利文,对推广中国医学起了一定的作用。1953年,PRINCETON大学开设了GEST东方图书馆,收藏75000册中医针灸书,为有识之士提供了接触中国医书的门径。

1971,中国向世界公开宣布针刺麻醉成功的消息,打破了西方医学家蒙昧保守的思维模式,开始接触中国医学,从而热烈的学习研究起来,就这样拉开了“中国针灸热”的序幕。次年2月,中美建交,美总统尼克松访华,其随行医师W.TKACH大力表扬中医针灸的优良疗效,就这样再把“中国针灸热”提升到高峰。医学界纷纷组团来向东方取经,当时到香港学习的不下万人,更多的到中国学习,回国后,就是一窝蜂开设诊所及学习班。以华盛顿地区为例,当时有针灸诊所十多所,但不足2年,差不多全部倒闭。其中的主要原因是水准低,常发生医疗事故,西医师公会多方面攻击阻拦,公安常来检控,禁止东方医师无执照行医。

中医针灸发展到这阶段,开始蕴酿出一场“美国医学革命”,它的“起火”地点就是在内华达州,要求中西医分体独立管治。

2.内州立法经过

1973年1月,纽约西医师公会邀请香港名中医针灸师陆易公氏在纽约亚美利加纳宾馆(AMERICANA)大会堂,为1500名西医师演讲针灸学。事后,得知纽约公安因中医针灸师无执照行医,曾加以拘捕处罚。当时陆氏认为此种做法对于美国人民的健康不公平。因为针灸治疗在中国已有数千年历史,人们赖以治愈病痛,延长生命,假如能够立法认可,人民得到治疗机会,则会对人民健康与生命有利无害。闻悉内州于4月间将会修改法律,何不趁此机会,要求立新法律俾中医针灸合法化。但问及亲朋好友,莫不大笑,认为痴人说梦话,因国有国法,家有家规,岂能由一位旅客身份的中国人改变美国国法,似此不可能的事,决没有成功希望,却有坐牢的可能。

虽然当年陆氏已有61岁高龄,但为了人类健康及提高中医针灸的国际地位,决定亲赴内州,争取立法。当时,惟有一位纽约退休老律师亚瑟·史坦勃(ARTHURSTEINBERG)先生大力支持,因其夫妇曾在香港经陆氏以针灸治愈多年病痛,对中医针灸极有好感及信心,愿协助同行,可免陷法律上的错误。抵达内州后,又因人地生疏,无可适从,幸得介绍认识一位初入公关公司服务的年轻人詹姆·乔埃斯(JIMJOYES)先生,从此,3人便联手进行这个极艰巨的任务。

3人为争取本地民众支持,日夜奔走,拜访居民,加以说服,一时竟引起针灸热潮,短时期内,估计已有3万人赞同。有此成绩,随即赶赴立法院申请立法,准予中医针灸合法行医。立法院诸位议员不相信有3万人的支持。于是,3人连夜赶印详细签名单,幸得大众热心,争相签名支持,州长更将其办公室隔壁小间放置签名单,不数日,名单已堆积如小山,当签满15000份名单时,州长认为人数已足够申请要求。

3人为了证明针灸能在无痛苦、无伤害的情形下安全治愈病者,以免费示范的形式,让真实疗效以示大众。立法院以3天为限,特许陆氏临时行医执照,几经磋商,才批准3个星期示范。此期中,对病者是好是坏,相信会有一个肯定的结果。所有病人均由全国各大医院、政府团体介绍随身带详细病历而来,并选取首府卡森(CARSON)城立法院对街新开业的宾馆奥姆斯贝(ORMSBYHOUSE)开诊。每天由晨8时至晚10时,扶杖及坐轮椅的病人,排若长龙。每天针治120名,无一简单易治之症,每多已在医院开刀一、二次至20余次者。电视台派员由早及晚现场播录治疗经过,若有病人因针刺死亡、或误伤、或疼痛呼叫等情况,即成为最强的医疗事故的证据;还有各大报社记者24小时轮候追随记述;在旁还站有十数位医学专家、政府要员,静观操作,约20分钟换班1次。

在场唯一的助手乃陆易公之夫人陈贞卿女士,精神上的压力,无止无休的体力疲劳,均已达到顶点,当夜11点晚餐时,陈女士昏倒在餐桌上。

宾馆主人的老母中风瘫痪,行动不便,坐轮椅请治,经针治后,自推轮椅归去;一位当地名律师因神经性耳聋,无法医治,无法出庭为客辩护,经针治4次而愈;有患佝偻20余年的小学教员,经针治1星期后,霍然而愈,她的1个二年级的小学生对其母亲说他的驼背老师这几天不知吃了什么东西,高了许多。诸如此类的疗效,不断在街头人群中传播。

美国《时代周刊》4月23日在首页报导针灸疗效犹似神迹,形容示范的宾馆仿佛变成了法国小镇LOURDES显圣迹之地。示范于3月19日至4月6日止,近500名病人得到治疗,结果相当满意。

议员们在立法院与陆易公医师经过一番舌战,公认疗效确切优良,毫无异议。最后投票结果:州众议院以30票对1票,另1票缺席,州参议院以20票对0票,通过法案。立法院内共和党和民主党完全合作,创立法院通过议案的绝对票数纪录。

陆医师及其夫人在获悉大功告成时,随即回房蒙头大睡两日夜,才开始出门见客。据陆医师说虽然精神健康以及经济濒临绝境,但能为中医针灸在国际上开出一条大路,已宿愿得偿了。

3.内州中医针灸法律几项重点

4月19日州长MIKEO’CALLAGHAN正式签署法案,立即成立中医医务局,执行本州内一切中医医务行政、教育、执照及注册等等工作;成立中医教育机构,开设中医各项学位课程;成立中医技术顾问委员会,指导医务局各项医务工作,审核资历,设计考试内容及教育研究工作等。每年考期2次,每次可用中英语作答,分笔试、口试、临床3部份,每部份均要取得合格水准。执照分4种:甲.传统中医学医师DOCTOROFTRADITIONALCHINESEMEDICINE;乙.中草药医师DOCTOROFHERBALMEDICINE;丙.针灸医师DOCTOROFACUPUNCTURE;丁.针灸助理员LICENSEDACUPUNCTUREASSISTANT。法律规定,一切未经中医医务局核准而行医者,均属违法。

4.内州立法后对各界影响

1973年内州中医针灸合法化后,其它各州也相继效法起来,如加州、德州、纽约、华盛顿、夏威夷、阿勒岗、蒙特那等诸州。可惜各地环境因素有异,加上西医师公会的强横势力,中医针灸师依然得不到独立开业权,需要依靠西医师先替病人诊断,然后发出介绍书,方可接受中医针灸治疗,这当然是一种职业歧视。有鉴于此,各州中医针灸界只好继续奔走,争取独立行医法律,其中最受嘱目的要算德州中医针灸法案了。1979年8月由联邦地方法院接手主审,邀请内州陆易公医师及其公子陆伯明医师上庭答辩并放映平日摄录的医案及电脑纪录,以示针灸疗效确切,由早及晚。事后,法官即命搜集有关修改法律的资料。余后数天,由各方代表陈述,其中加州的康宁(RICHARDKRONEING)医师亦掀起高潮。康氏为美国针灸权威,曾首次公开发表针刺止痛乃是脑吗啡分泌增强的作用,申辩的阵容如此坚强,西医医务局最后放弃上诉权。次年7月,判决书由联邦法院审结。这份判决书使日后各州争取独立开业行医权有例可援。

美国中医针灸合法化,亦引起欧联国家的重视,意大利在1997年立法院也有议案准备把中医针灸合法化。据《国际针灸交流手册》(山东科技出版社1992)记载,世界上有100多个国家均有中医针灸医师,深信中医针灸的国际地位会日益增强。

5.结论

美国中医针灸立法的正式起步,先由陆易公医师以深厚的学养、高水准和丰富的临床经验为基础,加上各方面人事的和谐协作,打破了各种政治利益的冲突,又在一个适当的时机和环境中,成功地建立起来了。

这个合法化,首先保障了美国人民应得的有水准的中医针灸治疗机会,造福于美国人民的健康,更重要的就是提高了中医针灸的国际地位,与西方医学共进。有鉴于此,内州政府为了感谢陆氏的重要贡献,特选于1992年7月16日陆氏80寿辰时,由州长BOBMILLER代表本州人民颁布宣言,详述内州为全美第1个州接受中医针灸合法行医,并宣告该日为“陆易公医师日”,嘉许为本州“杰出居民”,加授衔为“内州东方医学之父”。就这样,陆氏名垂于美国中医针灸史上,同时也是我们中国针灸传海外的一项光荣。

Read more: 中医针灸在美国第一个州的立法经过 – 祝君平安的日志 – 贝壳村

Dr.Arthur Fan notes: On March 20,2014, I met a patient who is Jim Joyce’s daughter(Marilee Joyce), mentioned her father’s story in Acupuncture legislation in Nevada in 1973. Both of her grander mother and mother had chronic headache, Jim brought them to see Dr.Lok and got recovery. Her father already passed away in 1993 due to his lung disease. Marilee published a book called “Gentle Giant” to tribute her father.

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