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Posts Tagged ‘Top Acupuncturist’

 

Dr.Arthur Fan has been rated as one of  “top acupuncturists” in Washington DC and northern Virginia area in the Website: www.RateMDs.com.

http://www.ratemds.com/filecache/topTen.jsp?city=WASHINGTON&sid=8

Best Rated Acupuncturists in WASHINGTON, DC
1 Tetsuhiro Ueno – Arlington
2 Yong Chen – Bethesda
3 ARTHUR FAN – VIENNA
4 SUZZANNE LOHR – WASHINGTON
5 ROCCO MANZIANO – SILVER SPRING
6 BK Mudahar – Washington
7 KERRI WESTHAUSER – BETHESDA
8 Wei Peng – BETHESDA

Best Rated Acupuncturists in herndon, VA
1 Tetsuhiro Ueno – Arlington
2 ARTHUR FAN – VIENNA
3 James Larmour – FAIRFAX
4 Rachal Lohr-Dean – Chantilly
5 SATORI POCH – RICHMOND
6 EUGENE ZHANG – FAIRFAX

Best Rated Acupuncturists in mclean, VA
1 Tetsuhiro Ueno – Arlington
2 ARTHUR FAN – VIENNA
3 James Larmour – FAIRFAX
4 SUZZANNE LOHR – WASHINGTON
5 BK Mudahar – Washington
6 SATORI POCH – RICHMOND
7 EUGENE ZHANG – FAIRFAX

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Yesterday, one of my patients reported “acupuncture is wonderful”–she no longer has the abdominal pain post her sex activities, that problem already existed for 5 years.

The pain was cramping-like, esp. after her getting orgasm. The reason is unknown.

The main acupuncture points were Ba-liao. Effectiveness is after two sessions’ acupuncture.

 

Painful Sex Still a Painful Secret

From ABC News Medical Unit, Feb. 25, 2008

Women who suffer from chronic painful sex often have stories that seem 60 years out of date: stories of secrets, of fear, of ignorance, of condescending doctors and foolish sex advice. 

Instead of sex that feels good, women report “a stinging, a stretching,” or say it feels “like something too big coming out of something too small” or “like it’s ripping you apart.”

While the pain is horrible, struggling to find treatment may be worse. Even top gynecologists agree that training on chronic sexual pain is minimal. 

“The curriculum is jammed with the explosion of knowledge, so there’s very little room to put [painful sex] in,” said Dr. Elizabeth Stewart, director of the Vulvovaginal Service at Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates and an assistant professor atHarvardMedicalSchool. 

“At any point 16 percent of women are walking around with pain for various reasons, and they’ve seen five doctors without a diagnosis,” said Stewart, who has written a book titled “The V Book” on the subject. 

With all the female-friendly pop culture encouraging women to say the V word — “Oprah,” “Sex in the City,” “The Vagina Monologues” — it’s hard to believe that such a lack of openness or knowledge would exist. But it does. 

After struggling for years to find treatment, a few women who’ve successfully overcome painful sex have begun to tell their private stories to help others.

Pain With No Common Name

“I didn’t really know it had a name for a really long time,” said Cynthia S., 36, who requested that her last name not be disclosed. 

“The pain was so bad, I couldn’t imagine putting a Q-tip in there,” said Cynthia. “During my pap smear I came close to passing out, it was awful.”

Cynthia believes her pain has something to do with being sexually abused as a child, but knowing the source and finding information to treat it are two separate things.

Cynthia was married for six years before finally finding a Web site (not a doctor) that described her condition. “Whoever is responsible for women’s health issues should definitely know this,” she said. 

“This” has a name, several actually, but medical doctors and psychiatrists don’t all agree. The simplest term to use, dyspareunia, literally means painful sex; however that term is loaded with psychological undertones. 

Dyspareunia first appeared in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, a handbook for mental health professionals, in 1968. By 1980, the term was introduced as one of two terms for sexual pain disorder. 

But while some painful sex disorders may indeed be purely psychological problems, the majority are not, says Sheryl A. Kingsberg, chief of behavioral medicine atUniversityHospitalsCaseMedicalCenterinCleveland,Ohio. 

“The key question is, is the pain sexual, or is the sex painful?” said Kingsberg, noting that this distinction is one that has been put forward by Irv Binik, an expert in sexual pain from McGill University in Canada. 

“Oftentimes we pathologize women and say it’s a sexual problem, when it is pain,” she said. 

A term with less psychological undertone is vulvodynia, which means pain of the vulva. But, experts say, this doesn’t help diagnose the cause of painful sex either. 

“We’ve named a disease based on a symptom,” said Dr. Andrew K. Goldstein, director of the Centers for Vulvovaginal Disorders inWashingtonD.C.andNew York City.

 

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Many patients choose anti-hypertension medications when diagnosed with hypertension. Many medical professionals also suggest patients with hypertension use such medications as soon as possible, and as long as possible. The reason being to prevent heart, brain and kidney complications caused by long-term and/or very high hypertension.

However, it would benefit patients with the stage one hypertension to seek non-medication treatment first.  At stage one, hypertension is more related to the imbalance of a patients’ autonomic nervous system; the high activity of sympathic nerve and low activity of vagus nerve. This imbalance can be corrected by one or more of the following: resting, meditation(such as Tai ji, Qigong or meditation-like yoga), acupuncture, or Chinese herbology. A lower sodium diet will also help to some extent.

Recently, there are have been few patients with hypertension who came to see me. One patient had hypertension for about four months prior the her visit due to high stress. Her father was very ill and passed away. She flew to his hospital prior to his death and stayed there to take care of him for many days. She did not get enough sleep and her BP was consistently 140-160/90-110mmHg.   When she came to me, her BP was 150/85mmHg. I gave her an acupuncture treatment, and after half hour’s treatment, her BP lowered to 126/86mmHg. I gave her an herbal pill, Jia Wei Xiao Yao Wan to use at home for one week. Today, she saw me again and reported that her BP was very stable-about 124/86mmHg(we confirmed this data). I treated her with acupuncture once again, and she admitted to feeling very relaxed.

Another patient who already has had stage two hypertension for a few years came to my office recently. She has been using acupuncture and herbs, and her blood pressure has also returned to normal.

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BENIGN ESSENTIAL TREMOR RESOLVED WITH ACUPUNCTURE

 

Cristina S. de la Torre, M.D.

 

 Medical Acupuncture. A Journal For Physicians By Physicians

Fall / Winter 1989 – Volume 1 / Number 1
“Aurum Nostrum Non Est Aurum Vulgi”

 

ABSTRACT– This article reviews the complete resolution of a case of benign essential tremor, in a patient treated with acupuncture, who previously had limited response to drug therapy. Three treatments were given over a three-week period. The patient’s tremor of the head and upper extremities resolved 100%, and she has remained asymptomatic to date (5 months after the last treatment).

 

     In April, 1989, a 38-year-old white female, presented with the chief complaint of intolerable shaking of her head for over one year. From 1987 until then, she was treated for a variety of routine conditions at the practice. She had been diagnosed as having benign essential tremor for many years. Her mother, also a patient of the practice, reported that the patient suffered tremor of the upper extremities since approximately age 2~3, being nicknamed “shaky bones” by her peers. The main medications were propanolol and diazepam, which only provided modest reduction in the intensity of the tremor.
Her condition had been extensively studied at several medical centers, where she was repeatedly told that “she had to learn to live with the tremor, hopefully obtaining some relief by taking prescribed medications”.
The patient’s family history was significant for alcoholism in both parents, a disease which had also afflicted her. She became a heavy drinker between the ages of 21 and 25, and then again between 35 and 37. Other significant medical history included asthma in childhood, excision of an ovarian cyst in 1970, and a twin pregnancy delivery in 1982. The patient is married and owns a successful business.
Marked tremor of the upper extremities (1,2,3), both postural and during voluntary activity, was observed since her first visit in 1987. Around February, 1988, the patient began to notice tremor of her head, which had not been present previously. In May, 1988, she was hospitalized for alcohol detoxification. Soon after discharge, she complained of worsening of her head tremor. She continued sober but increasingly tremulous u ntil April, 1989, when she returned, requesting acupuncture to help her with her head tremor, which by then had become intolerable.
The patient’s constitution was determined to be JUE YIN- Wood, on the East position, according to Dr. Yves Requena’s classification (4). Treatment was then organized following Dr. Maurice Mussat’s “Energy of Living Systems” theory (5,6), specifically the use of triangular equilibration.
Her first treatment, on April 14, 1989, consisted of a JUE YIN triangular equilibration in evolution, using points along the JUE YIN (Lived Master of the Heart), ABSOLUTE YIN (Conception Vessel), and YANG MING (Large Intestine/Stomach).
On her follow-up visit, one week later, she reported great improvement of her head tremor, and mentioned the onset of an unusual craving for sweets. She was then treated with a TAE YIN simple triangular equilibration, with points on TAE YIN (Spleen/ Lung), YANG MING and ABSOLUTE YANG (Governor Vessel).
On her third visit, on April 27, she reported further improvement of her head tremor, and an unexpected complete resolution of her upper extremities tremor. It was then decided to conclude her treatment series with a SHAO YANG simple triangular equilibration (Triple Heater/Gall Bladder), SHAO YIN (Kidney/Hear[), and ABSOLUTE YANG. She was instructed to return 3 weeks later for reassessment.
She did not return until 2 months later, on June 27, when she reported complete resolution of both her upper extremities and head tremor. She was still taking di-azepam, 5 mg twice a day, but had stopped taking propanelei. She was advised to taper off the diazepam, and return for another series of acupuncture treatments, should symptoms recur.
She did not return until 3 months later, on September 28, when she brought in her mother for treatment. At the time, the patient reported no recurrence of her symptoms, being free of tremor for 5 months to date, and without taking any medications. A physical examination, including neurological evaluation, was normal.

 

DISCUSSION 
Tremors may be physiologic or a symptom of neurologic disease, such as tumors, trauma, infections, demyelinating disease, Parkinson’s disease, peripheral neuropathy, and essential tremor (7). Benign essential tremor (called familial or hereditary tremor when there is a positive family history) is thought to be inherited as a Mendelian autosomal dominant trait. No neuropathological lesion has been recognized in post mortem examinations, its neurochemistry is unknown, and its pathophysiology is obscure (8). It may appear at almost any time, often in early adult life, but it may begin in childhood (9}. It is characterized by coarse, rhythmic and symmetric tremor, persisting throughout the range of motion of voluntary activity, increasing in amplitude as the limb approaches an object (finger-to-nose test), or in handling or bringing food or liquid to the mouth.
The frequency of the tremor varies between 6 and 12 Hz, most commonly recording 6-8 Hz (10). The tremor amplitude diminishes with rest and the use of alcohol, and is exacerbated by emotional and physical stress. Tremor increases m amplitude with age, and may eventually interfere with fine movements.
Propanolol (in doses of 40-240 mg/day) and other beta-antagonists which pass the blood-brain barrier and therefore have central and peripheral actions, have been used with varying responses, but no definitive cure (11,12). More recently, primidone has been reported to be as effective as propanolol in treating this condition (13). Alcohol, although the most effective agent, is not recommended. Chronic alcoholism in patients with essential tremor is often a consequence of their attempts to control the symptoms by drinking (14).
The treatment of tremors with acupuncture has 1cng been documented in the classical Chinese medical texts, and continued to be reported in the European and American literature (15), as “problems related to Wind of External and Internal origin”.
For wider clinical applications, the therapeutic response of benign essential tremor to acupuncture needs to be studied in a significant sample of patients with this same condition. However, the complexity of medical acupuncture is such that treatment protocols may be inadequate to incorporate the necessary data into a useful diagnostic and therapeutic formulation (16). The patient’s own diagram of constitutional characteristics, past history, family history, and associated symptoms, eventually determine the most appropriate therapeutic intervention in each case.
With this individualized approach, other functional movement disorders may also be considered as potentially responsive to Medical Acupuncture. Concomitantly, further observations of the effect of acupuncture on tremors may lead to unexpected insights into intrinsic aspects of the motor system.

 

REFERENCES 
1. Critchley E. Clinical manifestations of essential tremor. J. Neurology and Neurosurgery- Psychiatry. 1972; 35: 365-75.

 

2. Critchley M. Observations on essential (heredo-familial) tremor. Brain. 1949; 72: 113-39.

 

3. Marshall J. Observations on essential tremor. J. Neurology and Neurosurgery-Psychiatry. 1962; 25: 122-25.

 

4. Requena Y. Terrains and pathology in acupuncture. Vol I- Correlation with diathetic medicine. Paradigm Publications, Brookline, MA. 1986.

 

5. Mussat M. Energetique des Systemes Vivants. Medecine et Sciences Internationales, Paris. 1982. Transl. by J.M. Helms, 1983.

 

6. Mussat M. Cours d’Energetique des Systemes Vivants Appliquee a la Acupuncture. 1ere, 2eme, et 3eme Annee. Ecole Superieure d’Acupuncture Francaise. 1983.

 

7. Koller W., Lang A. et al. Psychogenic tremors. Neurology 1989; 39: 1094-99.

 

8. Adams R.D., & Victor, M. Principles of neurology- 4th edition. McGraw-Hill Information Services Co., New York. 1989, chapter 5.

 

9. Young R.R. In: Diseases of the nervous system- clinical neurobiology. Edited by Ashbury A.K. et al. W.B. Saunders Co. 1986, Vol 1, chapter 32.

 

10. Weiner W.J. & Goetz C.G. Neurology for the non-neurologist. 2nd edition. J.B.Lippincott Co., Philadelphia. 1989.

 

11. Dupont E., Hansen H.J. et al. Treatment of benign essential tremor with propanolol. Acta NeuroL Scand. 1973; 49: 75-84.

 

12. Winkler G.F., & Young R.R. Efficacy of chronic propanolol therapy in action tremors of the familial, senile or essential varieties. New Eng. J. Med. 1974; 290: 984-88.

 

13. Findley L.I., Cieeves L. et al. Primidone in essential tremor of the hands and head: A double blind controlled clinical study. J. Neurology and Neurosurgery- Psychiatry. 1985; 48: 911-15.

 

14. Growdon J.H., Shahani B.T. et al. The effect of alcohol on essential tremor. Neurology. 1975; 25: 259-62.

 

15. Kaptchuk T.J. The webb that has no weaver- understanding Chinese medicine. Congdon & Weed, New York. 1983.

 

16. UCLA Extension. Medical Acupuncture for Physicians. Santa Monica, California. J.M. Helms, course chairman.

www.ChineseMedicineDoctor.us


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Clin Exp Hypertens. 2010;32(7):423-5. Epub 2010 Sep 9.

Cupping for hypertension: a systematic review.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20828224

Lee MS, Choi TY, Shin BC, Kim JI, Nam SS. Source Division of Standard Research, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon, South Korea. drmslee@gmail.com

Abstract

The objective of this review is to assess the clinical evidence for or against cupping as a treatment for hypertension. We searched the literature using 15 databases from their inception to 30 June 2009, without language restrictions. We included all clinical trials (CTs) of cupping to treat hypertension in human patients. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane criteria. Two CTs met all inclusion criteria. One RCT (randomized CT) assessed the effectiveness of dry cupping on changes in cerebral vascular function compared with drug therapy. Their results suggested significant effect in favor of cupping on vascular compliance and degree of vascular filling. One uncontrolled observational study (UOS) tested wet cupping for acute hypertension and found that a one-time treatment reduced blood pressure. In conclusion, the evidence is not significantly convincing to suggest cupping is effective for treating hypertension. Further research is required to investigate whether it generates any specific effects for that condition.

Dr.Arthur Fan’s view:

Cupping is an effective, safe and easy way to treat the hypertension, esp. for the satge one.  However, due to limited information, many people could not know this is an effective way to treat people’s hypertension. Investing for its scientific study is a little bit charllenge, because this study will not give the industry any benefit (for drug study may have a big “money return”.)

Patients could use cupping by themselve in home, once a day for two weeks, and take BP everyday, then could see how effective it is!

The mechanism of cupping, is adjusting the “Qi flow” (adjusting autonomic nervous system), activating the blood circulation(at least the microcirculation), then BP automatically back to normal.

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From: National Institute of Health, National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)

NCCAM Clearinghouse

Acupuncture is one of the oldest, most commonly used medical procedures in the world. Originating in China moe than 2,000 years ago, acupuncture became widely known in the United States in 1971 when New York Times reporter James Reston wrote about how doctors in Beijing, China, used needles to ease his abdominal pain after surgery. Research shows that acupuncture is beneficial in treating a variety of health conditions.

In the past two decades, acupuncture has grown in popularity in the United States. In 1993, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) estimated that Americans made 9 to 12 million visits per year to acupuncture practitioners and spent as much as $500 million on acupuncture treatments.1 In 1995, an estimated 10,000 nationally certified acupuncturists were practicing in the United States. By the year 2000, that number is expected to double. Currently, an estimated one-third of certified acupuncturists in the United States are medical doctors.2

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has funded a variety of research projects on acupuncture that have been awarded by its National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institute of Dental Research, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and National Institute on Drug Abuse.

This information and resource package provides general information about acupuncture, summaries of NIH research findings on acupuncture, information for the health consumer, a list of additional information resources, and a glossary that defines terms italicized in the text. It also lists books, journals, organizations, and Internet resources to help you learn more about acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine.

Acupuncture Theories

Traditional Chinese medicine theorizes that the more than 2,000 acupuncture points on the human body connect with 12 main and 8 secondary pathways, called meridians. Chinese medicine practitioners believe these meridians conduct energy, or qi, between the surface of the body and internal organs.

Qi regulates spiritual, emotional, mental, and physical balance. Qi is influenced by the opposing forces of yin and yang. According to traditional Chinese medicine when yin and yang are balanced they work together with the natural flow of qi to help the body achieve and maintain health. Acupuncture is believed to balance yin and yang, keep the normal flow of energy unblocked, and restore health to the body and mind.

Traditional Chinese medicine practices (including acupuncture, herbs, diet, massage, and meditative physical exercises) all are intended to improve the flow of qi.3

Western scientists have found meridians hard to identify because meridians do not directly correspond to nerve or blood circulation pathways. Some researchers believe that meridians are located throughout the body’s connective tissue;4 others do not believe that qi exists at all.5,6Such differences of opinion have made acupuncture a source of scientific controversy.

Preclinical Studies

Preclinical studies have documented acupuncture’s effects, but they have not been able to fully explain how acupuncture works within the framework of the Western system of medicine.7,8,9,10,11,12

Mechanisms of Action

Several processes have been proposed to explain acupuncture’s effects, primarily those on pain. Acupuncture points are believed to stimulate the central nervous system (the brain and spinal cord) to release chemicals into the muscles, spinal cord, and brain. These chemicals either change the experience of pain or release other chemicals, such as hormones, that influence the body’s self-regulating systems. The biochemical changes may stimulate the body’s natural healing abilities and promote physical and emotional well-being.13 There are three main mechanisms:

  • Conduction of electromagnetic signals: Western scientists have found evidence that acupuncture points an strategic conductors of electromagnetic signals. Stimulating points along these pathways through acupuncture enables electromagnetic signals to be relayed at it greater rate than under normal conditions. These signals may start the flow of pain-killing biochemicals such as endorphins and of immune system cells to specific sites that are injured or vulnerable to disease.14,15
  • Activation of opioid systems: research has found that several types of opioids may be released into the central nervous system during acupuncture treatment, thereby reducing pain.16
  • Changes in brain chemistry sensation, and Involuntary body functions: studies have shown that acupuncture may alter brain chemistry by changing the release ofneurotransmitters and neurohormones in a good way. Acupuncture also has been documented to affect the parts of the central nervous system related to sensation and involuntary body functions, such as immune reactions and processes whereby a person’s blood pressure, blood flow, and body temperature are regulated.3,17,18
Conditions Appropriate for Acupuncture Therapy
Digestive
Abdominal pain
Constipation
Diarrhea
Hyperacidity
Indigestion
Emotional
Anxiety
Depression
Insomnia
Nervousness
Neurosis
Eye-Ear-Nose-Throat
Cataracts
Gingivitis
Poor vision
Tinnitis
Toothache
Gynecological
Infertility
Menopausal symptoms
Premenstrual syndrome
Miscellaneous
Addiction control
Athletic performance
Blood pressure regulation
Chronic fatigue
Immune system tonification
Stress reduction
Musculoskeletal
Arthritis
Back pain
Muscle cramping
Muscle pain/weakness
Neck pain
Sciatica
Neurological
Headaches
Migraines
Neurogenic
Bladder dysfunction
Parkinson’s disease
Postoperative pain
Stroke
Respiratory
Asthma
Bronchitis
Common cold
Sinusitis
Smoking cessation
Tonsilitis
Source: World Health Organization United Nations. “Viewpoint on Acupuncture.” 19 19 (revised).23

Clinical Studies

According to an NIH consensus panel of scientists, researchers, and practitioners who convened in November 1997, clinical studies have shown that acupuncture is an effective treatment for nausea caused by surgical anesthesia and cancer as well as for dental pain experienced after surgery. The panel also found that acupuncture is useful by itself or combined with conventional therapies to treat addiction, headaches, menstrual cramps, tennis elbow,fibromyalgia, myofascial pain, osteoarthritis, lower back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and asthma; and to assist in stroke rehabilitation.19

Increasingly, acupuncture is complementing conventional therapies. For example, doctors may combine acupuncture and drugs to control surgery related pain in their patients.20 By providing both acupuncture and certain conventional anesthetic drugs, doctors have found it possible to achieve a state of complete pain relief for some patients.16 They also have found that using acupuncture lowers the need for conventional pain-killing drugs and thus reduces the risk of side effects for patients who take the drugs.21,22

Outside the United States, the World Health Organization (WHO), the health branch of the United Nations, lists more than 40 conditions for which acupuncture may be used.23 The table (above) lists these conditions.

Currently, one of the main reasons Americans seek acupuncture treatment is to relieve chronic pain, especially from conditions such as arthritis or lower back disorders.24,25 Some clinical studies show that acupuncture is effective in relieving both chronic (long-lasting) and acute or sudden pain,26 but other research indicates that it provides no relief from chronic pain.27Additional research is needed to provide definitive answers.

FDA’s Role

The FDA approved acupuncture needles for use by licensed practitioners in 1996. The FDA requires manufacturers of acupuncture needles to label them for single use only.28 Relatively few complications from the use of acupuncture have been reported to the FDA when one considers the millions of people treated each year and the number of acupuncture needles used. Still, complications have resulted from inadequate sterilization of needles and from improper delivery of treatments. When not delivered properly acupuncture can cause serious adverse effects, including infections and puncturing of organs.1

NCCAM-Sponsored Clinical Research

Originally founded in 1992 as the Office of Alternative Medicine (OAM), the NCCAM facilitates the research and evaluation of unconventional medical practices and disseminates this information to the public. The NCCAM established in 1998, supports 13 Centers, where researchers conduct studies on complementary and alternative medicine for specific health conditions and diseases. Scientists at several Centers are investigating acupuncture therapy.

Researchers at the NCCAM Center at the University of Maryland in Baltimore conducted arandomized controlled clinical trial and found that patients treated with acupuncture after dental surgery had less intense pain than patients who received a placebo.20 Other scientists at the Center found that older people with osteoarthritis experienced significantly more pain relief after using conventional drugs and acupuncture together than those using conventional therapy alone.29

Researchers at the Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation in Minnesota are studying the use of acupuncture to treat alcoholism and addiction to benzodiazepines, nicotine, and cocaine. Scientists at the Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation in New Jersey are studying acupuncture to treat a strokerelated swallowing disorder and the pain associated with spinal cord injuries.

The OAM, now the NCCAM, also funded several individual researchers in 1993 and 1994 to conduct preliminary studies on acupuncture. In one small randomized controlled clinical trial, more than half of the I I women with a major depressive episode who were treated with acupuncture improved significantly.30

In another controlled clinical trial, nearly half of the seven children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder who underwent acupuncture treatment showed some improvement in their symptoms. Researchers concluded that acupuncture was a useful alternative to standard medication for some children with this condition.31

In a third small controlled study, eight pregnant women were given moxibustion to reduce the rate of breech births, in which tile fetus is positioned for birth feet-first instead of the normal position of head-first. Researchers found the treatment to be safe, but they were uncertain whether it was effective.32 Then, rescarchers reporting in the November 11, 1998, issue of theJournal of the American Medical Association conducted a larger randomized controlled clinical trial using moxibustion. They found that moxibustion applied to 130 pregnant women presenting breech significantly increased the number of normal head-first births.33

Acupuncture and You

The use of acupuncture, like many other complementary and alternative treatments, has produced a good deal of anecdotal evidence. Much of this evidence comes from people who report their own successful use of the treatment. If a treatment appears to be safe and patients report recovery from their illness or condition after using it, others may decide to use the treatment. However, scientific research may not substantiate the anecdotal reports.

Lifestyle, age, physiology, and other factors combine to make every person different. A treatment that works for one person in, y not work for another who has the very same condition. You, as a health care consumer (especially if you have a preexisting medical condition), should discuss acupuncture with your doctor. Do not rely on a diagnosis of disease by an acupuncturist who does not have substantial conventional medical training. If you have received a diagnosis from a doctor and have had little or no success using conventional medicine, you may wish to ask your doctor whether acupuncture might help.

Finding a Licensed Acupuncture Practitioner

Doctors are a good resource for referrals to acupuncturists. Increasingly, doctors are familiar with acupuncture and may know of a certified practitioner. In addition, more medical doctors, including neurologists, anesthesiologists, and specialists in physical medicine, are becoming trained in acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, and other alternative and complementary therapies. Friends and family members may be a source of referrals as well. In addition, national referral organizations provide the names of practitioners, although these organizations may be advocacy groups for the practitioners to whom they refer. See “Acupuncture Information Resources” for a list of these organizations.

Check a practitioner’s credentials.

A practitioner who is licensed and credentialed may provide better care than one who is not. About 30 states have established training standards for certification to practice acupuncture, but not all states require acupuncturists to obtain a license to practice. Although proper credentials do not ensure competency, they do indicate that the practitioner has met certain standards to treat patients with acupuncture.

The American Academy of Medical Acupuncture can give you a referral list of doctors who practice acupuncture. The National Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Alliance lists thousands of acupuncturists on its Web site and provides the list to callers to their information and referral line. The Alliance requires documentation of state license or national board certification from its listed acupuncturists. The American Association of Oriental Medicine can tell you the state licensing status of acupuncture practitioners across the United States as well. To contact these and other organizations, see “Acupuncture Information Resources.”

Check treatment cost and insurance coverage.

Reflecting public demand, an estimated 70 to 80 percent of the nation’s insurers covered some acupuncture treatments in 1996. An acupuncturist may provide information about the number of treatments needed and how much each will cost. Generally, treatment may take place over a few days or several weeks. The cost per treatment typically ranges between $30 and $100 but it may be more. Physician acupuncturists may charge more than nonphysician practitioners.13

Check treatment procedures.

Find out about the treatment procedures that will be used and their likelihood of success. You also should make certain that the practitioner uses 1 new set of disposable needles in a sealed package every time. The FDA requires the use of sterile, nontoxic needles that bear a labeling statement restricting their use to qualified practitioners. The practitioner also should swat, the puncture site with alcohol or another before inserting the needle.

Some practitioners may use electroacupuncture; others may use moxibustion. These approaches are part of traditional Chinese medicine, and Western researchers are beginning to study whether they enhance acupuncture’s effects.

During your first office visit, the practitioner may ask you at length about your health condition, lifestyle, and behavior The practitioner will want to obtain a complete picture of your treatment needs and behaviors that may contribute to the condition. This holistic approach is typical of traditional Chinese medicine and many other alternative and complementary therapies. Let the acupuncturist, or any doctor for that matter, know about all treatments or medications you are taking and whether you have a pacemaker, are pregnant, or have breast or other implants. Acupuncture may be risky to your health if you fail to tell the practitioner about any of these matters.

The Sensation of Acupuncture

Acupuncture needles arc metallic, solid, and hair-thin, unlike the thicker, hollow hypodermic needles used in Western medicine to administer treatments or take blood samples. People experience acupuncture differently, but most feel minimal pain as the needles are inserted. Some people are energized by treatment, while others feel relaxed. 34 Some patients may fear acupuncture because they are afraid of needles. Improper needle placement, movement of the patient, or a defect in the needle can cause soreness and pain during treatment.35 This is why it is important to seek treatment only from a qualified acupuncture practitioner.

As important research advances continue to be made on acupuncture worldwide, practitioners and doctors increasingly will work together to give you the best care available.

For More Information

For more information about acupuncture research sponsored by different parts of NIH contact the respective Information Office or Clearinghouse. Call the NIH operator for assistance at 301-490-4000.

For more information about research on acupuncture, contact the NIH National Library of Medicine (NLM), which has published a bibliography of more than 2,000 citations to studies conducted on acupuncture. The bibliography is available on the Internet athttp://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/cbm/acupuncture.html or by writing the NLM, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda. MD 20894. The NLM also has a toll-free telephone number: 1-888-346-3056.

For a database of research on complementary and alternative medicine, including acupuncture access the CAM Citation Index on the NCCAM Web site at http://altmed.od.nih.gov/nccam.

 

Glossary of Terms

Acupuncture – An ancient Chinese health that involves puncturing the skin with hair-thin needles at particular locations, called acupuncture points, oil the patient’s body. Acupuncture is believed to help reduce pa in or change a body function. Sometimes tile needles are twirled given a slight electric charge (see electroacupuncture) or warmed (see moxibustion).

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder – A syndrome primarily found in children and teenagers that is characterized by excessive physical movement, impulsiveness, and lack of attention.

Clinical studies (also clinical trials, clinical outcomes studies, controlled trials, case series, comparative trials, or practice audit evidence) – Tests of a treatment’s effects in humans. Treatments undergo clinical studies only after they have shown promise in laboratory studies of animals. Clinical studies help researchers find out whether a treatment is safe and effective for people. They also tell scientists which treatments are more effective than others.

Electroacupuncture – A variation of traditional acupuncture treatment in which acupuncture or needle points are stimulated electronically.

Electromagnetic signals – The minute electrical impulses that transmit information through and between nerve calls. For example, electromagnetic signals convey information about pain and other sensations within the body’s nervous system.

Fibromyalgia – A complex chronic condition having multiple symptoms, including muscle pain, weakness, and stiffness, fatigue; metabolic disorders, allergies and headaches.

Holistic – Describes therapies based on facts about the “whole person,” including spiritual and mental aspects, not only the specific part of the body being treated. Holistic practitioners may advise changes in diet, physical activity, and other lifestyle factors to help treat a patient’s condition.

Merldians – A traditional Chinese medicine term for the 14 pathways throughout the body for the flow of qi, or vital energy, accessed through acupuncture points.

Moxibustion – The use of dried herbs in acupuncture. The herbs are placed on top of acupuncture needles and burned. This method is believed to be more effective at treating some health conditions than using acupuncture needles alone.

Neurohorinones – Chemical substances made by tissue in the body’s nervous system that can change the structure or function or direct the activity of an organ or organs.

Neurological – A term referring to the body’s nervous system, which starts, oversees, and controls all body functions.

Neurotransmitters – Biochemical substances that stimulate or inhibit nerve impulses in the brain that relay information about external stimuli and sensations, such as pain.

Opioids – Synthetic or naturally occurring chemicals in the brain that may reduce pain and induce sleep.

Placebo – An inactive substance given to a participant in a research study as part of a test of the effects of another substance or treatment. Scientists often compare the effects of active and inactive substances to learn more about how the active substance affects participants.

Preclinical studies – Tests performed after a treatment has been shown in laboratory studies to have a desirable effect. Preclinical studies provide information about a treatment’s harmful side effects and safety it different doses in animals.

Qi (pronounced “chee”) – The Chinese term for vital energy or life force.

Randomized controlled clinical trials – A type of clinical study that is designed to provide information about whether a treatment is safe and effective in humans. These trials generally use two groups of people, one group receives the treatment and the other does not. The participants being studied do not know which group receives the actual treatment.

Traditional Chinese medicine – An ancient system of medicine and health care that is based on the concept of balanced qi or vital energy that flows throughout the body. Components of traditional Chinese medicine include herbal and nutritional therapy restorative physical exercises, medication acupuncture, acupressure, and remedial massage.

Yang – The Chinese concept of positive energy and forces in the universe and human body Acupuncture is believed to remove yang imbalances and bring the body into to balance.

Yin – The Chinese concept of negative energy and forces in the universe and human body. Acupuncture is believed to remove yin imbalances and bring the body into balance.

References

  • Lytle, C.D. An Overview of Acupuncture. 1993, Washington, DC: United States Department of Health and Human Services, Health Sciences Branch, Division of Life Sciences, Office of Science and Technology, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration.
  • Culliton, RD. “Current Utilization of Acupuncture by United States Patients.” National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference on Acupuncture, Program & Abstracts (Bethesda, MD, November 3-5,1997). Sponsors: Office of Alternative Medicine and Office of Medical Applications Research. Bethesda, MD: National Instittites of Health, 1997.
  • Beinfield, H. and Korngold, E.L. Between Heaven and Earth: A Guide to Chinese Medicine. New York, NY: Ballantine Books, 1991.
  • Brown, D. “Three Generations of Alternative Medicine: Behavioral Medicine, Integrated Medicine and Energy Medicine.” Boston University School of Medicine Alumni Report, Fall 1996.
  • Senior, K. “Acupuncture: Can It Take the Pain Away?” Molecular Medicine Today. 1996. 2(4):150-3.
  • Raso. J. Alternative Health Care: A Comprehensive Guide. Buffalo, NY Prometheus Books, 1994.
  • Eskinazi, D. P. “National Institutes of Health Technology Assessment Workshop on Alternative Medicine Acupuncture.” Journal of Alternative and Complementaty Medicine. 1996. 2(1):1-253
  • Tang, N.M., Dong, H.W., Wang, X. M., Tsui, Z.C., and Han, J.S. “Cholecystokinin Antisense RNA Increases the Analgesic Effect Induced by Electroacupuncture or Low Dose Morphine: Conversion of Low Responder Rats into High Responders.” Pain. 1997. 71(1)-.71-80.
  • Cheng, X.D., Wu, G. C., He, Q. Z., and Cao, X. D. “Effect of Electroacuptuncture on the Activities ol Tyrosine Protein Kinasc in Subcellular Fractions of Activited T Lymphocytcs from the Traumatized Rao;.” Immunopharmacology. Forthcoming.
  • Chen, L.B. and Li, S.X. “The Effects of Electrical Acupuncture of Neiguan in the PO2 of the Border Zone Between Ischemic and Non-Ischemic Myocardium in Dogs.” Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine. 1983, 3(2):8 1-8.
  • Lee, H.S. and Kim, J.Y. “Effects on Blood Pressure and Plasma Renin Activity in Two Kidney One Clip Goldblatt Hypertensive Rats.” American Journal of Chinese Medicine. 1994. 22(3-4):215-9.
  • Okada, K_ Oshima, M., and 1 Kawakita, K. “Examination of the Afferentnt Fiber Responsible for the Suppression of Jaw-Open Reflex in Heat, Cold and Manual Acupuncture Stimulation in Anesthetized Rats.” Brain Research. 1996 740(1-2):201-7.
  • National Institutes of Health. Frequently. Asked Questions About Acupuncture. Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health, 1997.
  • Dale, R.A. “Demythologizing Acupuncture Part 1. The Scientific Mechanisms and the Clinical Uses.” Alternative & Complementary Therapies Journal. April 1997. 1(2)-.125-31.
  • Takeshige, C. “Mechanism of Acupuncture Analgesia Based on Animal Experiments.”Scientific Bases of Acupuncture. Berlin, Germany: Springere-Verlag, 1989.
  • Han, J.S. “Acupuncture Activates Endogenous Systems of Analgesia.” National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference on Acupuncture, Program & Abstracts (Bethesda, MD. November 3-5, 1997). Sponsors: Office of Alternative Medicine and Office of Medical Applications of Research. Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health, 1997.
  • Wu, B., Zhou, R.X., and ZI M.S. “Effect of Acupuncture on Interleukin-2 Level and NK Cell Immunoactivity of Peripheral Blood of Malignant Tumor Patients.” Chung Kyo Chung Hsi I Chieh Ho Tsa Chich. 1994.14(9):537-9.
  • Wit, B. “Effect Of Acupuncture on the Regulation of Cell-Mediated Immunity in Patients with Malignant Tumors.” Chen Tzu Yen Chiu. 1995, 20(3):67-71.
  • National Instituties of Health Consensus Panel. Acupuncture National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Statement November 3-5, 1997). Sponsors: Office of Alternaive Medicine –ind Office of Medical Application., of Research Bethesda, MD: N ational Institutes of, Health, 1997.
  • Lao, L., Bergman, S., Langenherg, P, Wong, R., and Berman, B. “Efficacy of Chinese Acupuncture on Postoperative Oral Surgery Pain,” Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology. 1995.79(4):423-8.
  • Lewith, G.T. and Vincent, C. “On the Evaluation of the Clinical Effects of Acupuncture: A Problem Reassessed and a Framework for Future Research.” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 1996. 2(1):79-90.
  • TsibuIiak,VN., Alisov, A.P, and Shatrova,V.P. “Acupuncture Analgesia and Analgesic Transcutaneous Electroneurostimulation in the Early Postoperative Period,”Anesthesiology and Reanimatology 1995. 2:93-8,
  • World Health Organization. Viewpoint on Acupuncture. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, 1979.
  • Bullock, M.L., Pheley.A.M., Kiresuk.T.J., Lenz, S.K., and Culliton, PD. “Characteristies and Complaints of Patients Seeking Therapy at a Hospital-Based Alternative Medicine Clinic.” Journal of Alternative Medicine 1997-30):31-7.
  • Diehl, D.L., Kaplan, G., Coulter, I., Glik, D.,and Hurwitz, E.L.” Use of Acupuncture by American Physicians.” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 1997, 3(2):119-26.
  • Levine, J.D., Gormley, J., and Fields, H.J., “Observatins on the Analgesic Effects of Needle Puncture (Acupuncture).” Pain. 1976.2(2):149-59.
  • Ter Reit, G., Kleijnen, J., and Knipschild, P. “Acupuncture and Chronic Pain: A Criteria-Based Meta-Analysis.” Clinical Epidemiology 1990 43:1191-9.
  • U.S. Food and Drug Administration. “Acupuncture Needles No Longer Investigational”FDA Consumer Magazine June 1996.30(5).
  • Berman, B., Lao, L., Bergman, S., Langenberg, P, Wong, R., Loangenberg, P, and Hochberg, M. “Efficacy of Traditional Chinese Acupuncture in the Treatment of Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study.” Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 1995. (3):139-42.
  • Allen, J.J.B. “An Acupuncture Treatment Study for Unipolar Depression.” Psychological Science. 1998. 9:397-401.
  • Sonenklar, N. Acupuncture and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. National Institutes of Health, Office of Alternative Medicine Research Grant *R21 RR09463. 1993.
  • Milligan, R. Breech Version by Acumoxa. National Instituties of Health, Office of Alternative Medicine Research Grant #R21 RR09327. 1993.
  • Cardini, F. and Weixin, H. “Moxibustion for Correction of Breech Presentation: A Randomized Controlled Trial..” Journal of the American Medical Association. 1998. 280:1580-4
  • American Academy of Medical Acupuncture “Doctor, What’s This Acupuncture All About? Brief Explanation for Patients.“Los Angeles. CA: American Academy of Medical Acupuncture, 1996.
  • Lao, L. “Safety Issues in Acupuncture.” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 1996, 2(1):27-9.

  • Go to NCCAM Resource List Go to NCCAM web site for more current information
  • www.ChineseMedicineDoctor.US

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Is Traditional Chinese medicine Effective For Peripheral Neurology Pain?

Original article is at http://articlesprofessionals.com/health-fitness/is-traditional-chinese-medicine-effective-for-peripheral-neurology-pain September 11, 2011 | Author: Barbara Thomas

Leads to of Peripheral Neurophysiology

Peripheral neurophysiology is a typical issue that specifically affects diabetics, individuals present process radiation treatment, and those with HIV. The most common regions impacted by neuropathy are the ft with the second becoming the fingers. Peripheral neuropathy signs might be diverse and can involve decreased sensation, elevated feeling, weak point of ankle or hand muscles, and signs and symptoms related to changes in the skin and nails.

Unfortunately, as the prevalence of diabetic issues increases, person suffering from diabetes neuropathy becomes more common. Statistics transcribe that 25% of person suffering from diabetes patients will experience neuropathic feet discomfort. And, because the incidence of diabetic issues is increasing, so is the incidence of neuropathy signs or symptoms.

Solution Choices

Of course, the most efficient implies of assisting to management diabetic issues connected path discomfort is working to manage all forms of diabetes itself. After signs and symptoms possess started, drugs like Lyrica and Neurontin are frequently recommended to assist management the neurological discomfort. For a lot of, the use of these medications are either ineffective or have facet effects which threshhold their use. In view of these the use of replenishable medicines similar to acupuncture is a far more prevalent.

Acupuncture Study

Once thinking about any solution hope it is fair to evaluate what the explore has to say regarding how effective the remedy is. For individuals suffering from peripheral neuropathy, there is great information regarding chinese medicine.

A 2007 examine entitled “Clinical commentary on bring about of acupuncture in healing diabetic peripheral neuropathy” concerned a overall of 60 participants. The study observed which individuals receiving chinese medicine had a statically higher remodeling in neurological signs and symptoms as well as enhanced nerve act for each sensory and engine nerve conduction when in contrast to the control organization team.

An additional examine carried out in Africa in 2006 located that for the 126 individual patients which received traditional chinese medicine for person suffering from diabetes peripheral neuropathy, 86% deemed the therapy as being efficient for lowering symptoms in their fingers and ft.

In a 2006 Canadian examine entitled “Traditional chinese medicine treatment for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy–a claim series” chinese medicine was utilized in five instances to decrease neuropathic pain in cancer patients. The chinese medicine treatment was considered effective in these instances where medication had failed.

And finally, in a Chinese language examine involving 90 participants, individuals receiving whole body or arm and ankle traditional chinese medicine has appreciably improved blood vessels glucose and lipids, decreased bloodstream viscosity, and enhanced features of peripheral nerve cells, therefore provoking therapeutic results for diabetic peripheral neuritis when in contrast to the control organization team. The examine additionally observed no significant difference in between the full body group and the ankle and arm remedy group.

Doing so sampling of the research in the use of acupuncture for the solution of peripheral neuropathy is really encouraging. Due to the nominal facet effects using chinese medicine in contrast to pharmaceutical remedy options, traditional chinese medicine should be regarded as as a reasonable treatment option for symptoms of neuropathy.

Is Chinese medicine Effective For Peripheral Neuropathy Pain? – Check Out peripheral neuropathy and neuralgia

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In early half month of the April, we got two “pregnant” news from our patients.  So, Dr.Fan has at least 47 success cases since Jan, 2007 ( during 53 months).

Some success cases  did not report to him, due to some patients got pregnant after the treatments period, they may think they got pregnant by themselves. For example, one patient said, she got pregnant one month after she terminated Dr. Fan’s treatment.  She said she is not sure–this pregnant relates to acupuncture or Chinese herb treatments.

Actually, the main purpose of Chinese medicine, included in acupuncture, is normalizing  patients’ own function (we call this Taoism focus), so after acupuncture or herbal tea/pills, the original abnormal has diminished, or corrected, patient could get pregnant in any coming month, this also depend on the date of intercourse, the male part, not only depend on female part.

Getting pregnant after acupuncture or Chinese herbal tea, such as during half year, if there is no other treatment, the pregnant should be considered– related to acupuncture or Chinese herbology treatments.

No.1 case is a 35 years old woman who had irregular period cycles, and had period flow spotting, after 3 month acupuncture (actually she did not follow a strict treatments plan, due to too busy), sometime with herbal tea, she report she has 45 days pregnant. Currently, she comes for morning sick treatments.

No.2 case is 37 years old patient. She came for activating her period. She had 3 irregular periods after she had stopped using birth control pills in last August. Then her period stopped for 4 month.  Before she saw me, she had blood test, it was sure she did not get pregnant.  She was very anxious and with other uncomfortable. I did a few acupuncture for her. Hope her period could come soon.  However, it does not.  Now her pregnancy test is positive and the ultrasound showed she has 6 week pregnant and has Twin babies.

So, in some rare condition, even the woman has no period for a long time, actually she may still have ovulation, and has chance to get pregnant!

The pregnancy test was negative, I think at that time, she did not get pregnant. After that, either by herself, or by acupuncture, etc, her got pregnant.

www.ChineseMedicineDoctor.US

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About one year, one lady, 42 year old, came to see me for acupuncture treatments because of her neck/shoulder severe pain.

After she got some effectiveness, both her and her husband told me they want to have another baby, ask me if acupuncture could help. I said “yes”. They have a son 5 years old.  So I added additional needles for improving the fertility. After about one month, they reported me– “already got pregnant”.

Then, one or two month later, this lady had vaginal bleeding, her  husband came and we gave him 3 packs herbs to protect the lady’s pregnancy–it worked well, the bleeding stopped.

Two weeks ago, whole family came and brought the new baby to see me, we had pictures together.  Here posted is one of the pictures “Acupuncture-baby” Elliana S.

For getting baby, Acupuncture works!

www.ChineseMedicineDoctor.us

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Someone may interest in learning acupuncture and oriental/Chinese medicine. Here is a good article, read 18 topics in  the link below.

http://www.insights-for-acupuncturists.com/acupuncture-school.html

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Online literature is very few in Chinese medicine treating Parkinson disease. We published two papers in this scope in Chinese language in 1990s.

After I settle down in America, I did not report my clinical experience in this field.

Recently, I have a successful case in Parkinson disease, using scalp acupuncture and traditional systemic acupuncture, as well as Chinese herbal tea, now patient recovered 70%.  He said he was embarrassed before, now he has confidence to see other people, because in most of time, he no longer shakes.

www.ChineseMedicineDoctor.us

 

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K. N. , an eleven years old boy, was recovered from his half year extreme fatigue, low fever which was from mono, last week.

Six month ago, he was very sick, the diagnosis was Mono, a virus illness, and had some treatments from his conventional medical doctor.  Since then, he always feels very tired, some time has fever.  He had extreme fatigue, had to sleep 12 to 18 hours a day, so he missed his school over one and half month.

When he came to see me, his face was pale, tongue and lips were very red, complexion very tired, and eyes showed no-spirit.  Pulse slight quick. Temperature 99.1 degree F.

We diagnosed him as blood- heat syndrome, used Chinese herbs and acupuncture to treat him.  In second day, he backed to school. Yesterday he had the third visit. His mom and he were very happy, everything is stable, no longer sleep so long hours, he said he has “too much energy” and only need sleep 7 to 8 hours.

Our experience is, the syndrome post mono, basically is extreme fatigue or low appetite, using acupuncture or Chinese medicine is very easy to get recover. This case is my no.4 case of Mono, all of these patients got recover in one or two weeks.

His brother J.N.  saw me for his chronic cough, due to allergy and asthma issue, after the first acupuncture treatment, his whistle sound in his lungs disappeared.

 

 

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Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (AOM), i.e.Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)’s definition, scope, research, education and license requirements.

Special report of SAR. Article from the official Journal of AAAOM, Acupuncturist.March 31, 2009.

http://www.aaaomonline.info/aom_in_us.pdf

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Acupuncture and ADHD
By: Diane Joswick, L.Ac.(Article from http://www.acufinder.com/Acupuncture+Information/Detail/Acupuncture+and+ADHD)

 

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common behavioral conditions among children. In the United States alone, approximately 4.5 million children between the ages of 5-17 years old are diagnosed with ADHD each year. Research indicates that when treating ADHD, a multidisciplinary approach is most effective; combining behavioral therapy, exercise, dietary changes and medication. Now acupuncture can be added as one of the treatment methods that can successfully manage ADHD.

What is ADHD?

Attention Deficit/Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) is a condition of the brain that makes it difficult to concentrate or control impulsive behavior.

Children with ADHD generally struggle with paying attention or concentrating. They can’t seem to follow directions and are easily bored or frustrated with tasks. They also tend to move constantly and are impulsive, not stopping to think before they act. These behaviors are generally common in children. But they occur more often than usual and are more severe in a child with ADHD. The behaviors that are common with ADHD interfere with a child’s ability to function at school and at home.

Adults with ADHD may have difficulty with time management, organizational skills, goal setting, and employment. They may also have problems with relationships, self-esteem, and addictions.

Treatment for ADHD

Treatment for ADHD is multifaceted. It consists of ADHD medications, behavioral therapy and lifestyle and dietary modifications. ADHD is best managed when families, educational and health professionals work together to meet the unique needs of the child or adult who has ADHD to help them learn to focus their attention, develop their personal strengths, minimize disruptive behavior, and become productive and successful. Acupuncture is an excellent addition to any treatment plan as it is used to help the body restore balance, treating the root of the disorder, while also diminishing the symptoms of ADHD.

What acupuncture can help with:

  • Improve focus and attention
  • Manage moods
  • Reduce fidgeting
  • Lower hyperactivity
  • Augment mood management techniques
  • Enhance concentration

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Dr. Fan has treated Tics or Tourette’s syndrome since 1990 both in China and in America using Chinese medicine, acupuncture.

The following links show his Power Point Slides and a video.

Tourette’s syndrome 04082010

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyiwTbi2jcw

Two colleagues, Dr. Liu H from Elicott City, Maryland discussed the treatments for different headache (migraine, Tension headache, Sinus headache etc), and Dr. Peng Y from Silver Spring discussed the treatments for neck pain.

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