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Today, White Paper version 2.0 was published online first at the Website of Journal of Integrative Medicine

http://www.jcimjournal.com/articles/publishArticles/pdf/S2095-4964(17)60378-9.pdf

Acupuncture’s Role in Solving the Opioid Epidemic: Evidence, Cost-Effectiveness, and Care Availability for Acupuncture as a Primary, Non-Pharmacologic Method for Pain Relief and Management, White Paper 2017

Abstract by Arthur Yin Fan

The title of White Paper is “Acupuncture’s Role in Solving the Opioid Epidemic: Evidence, Cost-Effectiveness, and Care Availability for Acupuncture as a Primary, Non-Pharmacologic Method for Pain Relief and Management, White Paper 2017”白皮书的题目是“针灸在解决阿片类药物危机中的作用:针灸作为一线非药物疗法治疗和控制疼痛的证据、花费和医疗服务的可行性”。

There were 6 organizations as the co-publishers-参加发表该白皮书的有6个合作单位:The American Society of Acupuncturists, ASA美国针灸师联合会 、The American Alliance for Professional Acupuncture Safety, AAPAS美国执业针灸安全联盟 ,  The Acupuncture Now Foundation, ANF针灸立刻行动基金会,  The American TCM Association, ATCMA全美中医药学会 ,  The American TCM Society, ATCMS)美国中医针灸学会和全美华裔中医药总会 National Federation of TCM Organizations, NFTCMO 。

White paper  was drafted and edited based on a letter, which original authors were(白皮书起草是在一封信的基础上起步的,信的原文作者是): The Joint Acupuncture Opioid Task Force (Chair: Bonnie M. Abel Bolash, MAc, LAc. Member organizations: The Acupuncture Now Foundation (ANF) ,The American Society of Acupuncturists (ASA) ;组员: Matthew Bauer, LAc ;Bonnie Bolash, LAc ; Lindy Camardella, LAc; Mel Hopper Koppelman, MSc ;John McDonald, PhD, FAACMA ;Lindsay Meade, LAc ;David W Miller, MD, LAc .

The first (revising) author 白皮书修改稿第一作者: Arthur Yin Fan, CMD, PhD, LAc (ATCMA) ;Correspondent author通讯作者: David W Miller, MD, LAc 。Other authors参与白皮书的其他作者: Sarah Faggert, DAc, LAc; Hongjian He, CMD, LAc;Mel Hopper Koppelman, MSc; Yong Ming Li, MD, PhD, LAc ; Amy Matecki, MD, LAc*;David W Miller, MD, LAc; John Pang, MD** , etc . *Division Chief, Dept. of Medicine, Highland Hospital, Alameda Health System; **Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.

Abstract

The United States is facing a national opioid epidemic, and medical systems are in need of non-pharmacologic strategies that can be employed to decrease the public’s opioid dependence. Acupuncture has emerged as a powerful, evidence based, safe, cost-effective, and available treatment modality suitable to meeting this need. Acupuncture has been shown to be effective for the management of numerous types of pain, and mechanisms of action for acupuncture have been described and are understandable from biomedical, physiologic perspectives. Further, acupuncture’s cost-effectiveness could dramatically decrease health care expenditures, both from the standpoint of treating acute pain and through avoiding the development of opioid addiction that requires costly care, destroys quality of life, and can lead to fatal overdose. Numerous federal regulatory agencies have advised or mandated that healthcare systems and providers offer non-pharmacologic treatment options, and acupuncture stands as the most evidence-based, immediately available choice to fulfil these calls. Acupuncture can safely, easily, and cost -effectively be incorporated into hospital settings as diverse as the emergency department, labor and delivery suites, and neonatal intensive care units to treat a variety of pain seen commonly in hospitals.

Acupuncture is already being successfully and meaningfully utilized by the Veterans Administration and various branches of the U.S. Military.

摘要

美国正处于整个国家的阿片类药物流行危机,医疗系统亟需非药物的疗法、用以治疗疼痛并减少公众对阿片类药物的依赖。针灸作为强有效的、循证的、安全的、具有成本效益的治疗方式,满足这一需求。众多针灸临床试验已经证明针灸对许多类型的疼痛治疗有效,针灸的作用机制已被阐明,并且可以从生物医学和生理学角度解释。同时,从治疗急性疼痛的角度来看,针灸的成本效益可能会大大降低医疗保健支出,并避免发生昂贵的阿片类药物成瘾、破坏生命质量、并导致致命的过量。许多联邦监管机构已经建议或强制医疗保健系统和提供者提供非药物治疗选项,而针灸是最具实证性的、并立即可以采用。针灸可以安全、便利、经济有效地纳入医院设置,如急诊部门、产房以及新生儿重症监护室等,用以治疗医院里普遍见到的各种疼痛。

退伍军人管理局和美国军方的各个部门已经成功地有针对性地采用针灸。

  1. Acupuncture is an effective, safe, and cost-effective treatment for numerous types of acute and chronic pain. Acupuncture should be recommended as a first line treatment for pain before opiates are prescribed, and may reduce opioid use.

针灸疗法安全有效、经济,治疗多种急慢性疼痛有效:理应作为疼痛的一线治疗,先于阿片类药物使用,针灸疗法可以显著减少阿片类药物用量(我们在以下各分项中归纳了众多证据)。

1.1 Effectiveness/Efficacy of acupuncture for different types of pain.

针灸疗法治疗多种疼痛有效。

1.2 Safety and feasibility of acupuncture for pain management.

针灸疗法治疗疼痛安全、易行。

1.3 Cost-effectiveness of acupuncture for pain management.

针灸疗法治疗疼痛可以减少支出。

1.4 Can adjunctive acupuncture treatment reduce the use of Opioid-like medications?

结合使用针灸疗法可以减少阿片的用量。 

  1. Acupuncture’s analgesic mechanisms have been extensively researched and acupuncture can increase the production and release of endogenous opioids in animals and humans.

针灸的镇痛机制已经有大量的研究,针灸增加动物和人类的内源性阿片肽并促其释放。

  1. Acupuncture is effective for the treatment of chronic pain involving maladaptive neuroplasticity.

针灸治疗慢性疼痛涉及改善其病态的神经塑形。

  1. Acupuncture is a useful adjunctive therapy in opiate dependency and rehabilitation.

针灸是有益的治疗阿片依赖并促其康复的辅助疗法。

  1. Acupuncture has been recommended as a first line non-pharmacologic therapy by the

FDA, as well as the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in coping with the opioid crisis. The Joint Commission has also mandated that hospitals provide non-pharmacologic pain treatment modalities.

针灸已被FDA、以及美国国家科学院、国家工程院和国家医科院三院应对阿片类药物危机联合委员会推荐为一线非药物疗法。医院考核联合委员会也已经把非药物治痛疗法列为医院必须包括的项目。

  1. Among most non-pharmacologic al managements for pain relief now available, acupuncture therapy is the most effective and specific for opioid abuse and overuse.

迄今为止,可用的非药物治疗疼痛的疗法,针灸疗法最为有效并对于阿片类药物滥用和过用使用针对性最强。 

  1. Acupuncture is widely available from qualified practitioners nationally.

美国有足够的合格的针灸师

http://www.jcimjournal.com/articles/publishArticles/pdf/S2095-4964(17)60378-9.pdf

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Acupuncture’s Role in Solving the Opioid Epidemic

Part 1: Effective and Safe

Evidence, Cost-Effectiveness, and Care Availability for Acupuncture as a Primary, Non-Pharmacologic Method for Pain Relief and Management

http://www.pacificcollege.edu/news/blog/2017/09/29/acupuncture%E2%80%99s-role-solving-opioid-epidemic-part-1-effective-and-safe

 

September 26, 2017, the release of a comprehensive white paper, “Acupuncture’s Role in Solving the Opioid Epidemic”, credited to dozens of authors and a half-dozen different organizations of acupuncturists and TCM professionals. In this series, we’ll be looking at the different reasons why and the ways in which acupuncture can help alleviate the opioid abuse epidemic wreaking havoc in America.

Over the past 20 years, pain management has become nearly synonymous with opioids. Recent data has shown that opioid prescriptions vary widely and that most surgical patients are over-prescribed, with 70% of pills going unused, leaving opioids lying around in many households.(26) About 6% of all Americans prescribed opioids after surgery become dependent upon those opioids; in head and neck cancer patients, however, it’s as high as 40%.(28) Although they do manage pain, even for those who don’t become dependent, opioids lengthen patients’ recovery times through side effects like sedation, pneumonia, and delirium.

Acupuncture, on the other hand, is a safe, affordable, and readily available non-pharmacologic approach to decreasing opioid dependence that our healthcare systems badly need. It can be used in hospital settings from the emergency room to delivery room, and it’s already in use by the Veterans Administration and the US military.

Part 1: Acupuncture is an effective and safe treatment for both acute and chronic pain.

A growing body of research supports the effectiveness of acupuncture for the relief of pain, especially chronic pain, with the strongest evidence emerging for back, neck, and shoulder pain; chronic headaches; and osteoarthritis.

The Acupuncture Evidence Project(1), which we’ve previously covered, searched the literature with a focus on the highest form of evidence available to identify the conditions for which acupuncture has been found to be most effective. They also looked for evidence of acupuncture’s safety and cost-effectiveness and reported how the evidence for acupuncture’s effectiveness has changed over an eleven-year time-frame. Overall, the study found evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture for 117 conditions, with stronger evidence for some conditions than others. Strong or moderate evidence supported the effectiveness of acupuncture for almost fifty conditions, including IBS, many varieties of musculoskeletal pain, post-operative nausea and vomiting, some types of headaches, PTSD, obesity, and stroke, as well as the aftereffects of stroke. It was found to be particularly safe and cost-effective compared to other potential treatments for allergic rhinitis and migraine.

In another study, the largest study of its kind to date, nearly half a million patients were treated with acupuncture for headache, low back pain, and/or osteoarthritis in an open pragmatic trial; treating physicians rated it as effective in 76% of all cases. Minor side effects were seen in 8% of patients, and major side effects in only 13 patients total.(3) Other studies found acupuncture, particularly electroacupuncture, equal or superior to standard care for sciatica, joint pain, post-surgical discomfort, and the infamously difficult-to-treat fibromyalgia.

Next time: acupuncture is affordable and reduces opioid use.

26: Hill MV, McMahon ML, Stucke RS, Barth RJ. Wide Variation and Excessive Dosage of Opioid Prescriptions for Common General Surgical Procedures. Annals of Surgery. 2017: 265(4), 709-714. doi:10.1097/sla.0000000000001993.

28: Pang J, Tringale KR, Tapia VJ, Moss WJ, et al (2017). Chronic Opioid Use Following Surgery for Oral Cavity Cancer. JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surgery. 2017: doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2017.0582.

1: McDonald J, Janz S. The Acupuncture Evidence Project: A Comprehensive Literature Review. Australian Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine Association Limited, Dec 19, 2016.

3: Weidenhammer W, Streng A, Linde K, Hoppe A, Melchart D. Acupuncture for Chronic Pain within the Research Program of 10 German Health Insurance Funds–Basic Results from an Observational Study. Complementary Therapies in Medicine. 2007;15(4):238-46.

Read the original white paper

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The Illegal and Unsafe Practice of Acupuncture 

 

Under the Term “Dry Needling”,

 

10 Facts You Should Know

 

Here are 10 facts you should know about the illegal and unsafe practice of acupuncture under the term “dry needling:”

1. “Dry needling” is acupuncture.

“Dry needling” was first described over 2,000 years ago in China’s earliest and most comprehensive extant medical treatise, the Yellow Emperor’s Inner Classic (Huangdi neijing), where it discusses in detail using tender or painful points, also known as “trigger points” or “motor points,” to treat pain and dysfunction, particularly of the neuromusculoskeletal system. Simply described, “dry needling” involves inserting an acupuncture needle into a tender or painful point and then appropriately manipulating (rotating and/or pistoning) it for therapeutic purposes.

 

2. Tender or painful points, also known as “trigger points” or “motor points,” are acupuncture points.

Tender or painful points are located in muscles and connective tissues, and, as their name suggests, are identified through tenderness or pain on palpation. This was, in fact, one of acupuncture’s earliest forms of point selection. China’s preeminent physician, Sun Si-Miao (581–682 C.E.), called these tender or painful points “ashi” points. In Chinese, ashi means Ah yes!(That’s the right spot.). So, when the tender or painful point is pressed, the patient feels an unexpected local and/or referred “wince-pain” and says Ah yes! That’s the right spot. Incidentally, in a 1977 study published in Pain (the official journal of the International Association for the Study of Pain), Melzack, Stillwell and Fox established that “every trigger point [reported in the Western medical literature] has a corresponding acupuncture point.”* A number of studies subsequently published in the Western medical literature have reached this same basic conclusion.

 

* Source: Melzack R, Stillwell DM, Fox EJ. Trigger points and acupuncture points for pain: correlations and implications. Pain. 1977 Feb;3(1):3–23.

 

3. “Dry needling” is not “manual therapy;” it is acupuncture.

It is important to emphasize that “dry needling” is an invasive, acupuncture needle intervention (that is, it is acupuncture, a specialized form of minimally invasive surgery), whereas manual therapy is a noninvasive, hands-on intervention (for example, massage, mobilization/manipulation). Manual therapy certainly does not include the practice of surgery in any form.

 

4. “Dry needling” is not a “technique;” it is acupuncture.

To make clear, the act of inserting an acupuncture needle into the body, under any pretense, or for any purpose whatsoever, is the practice of acupuncture.

 

5. Physical therapists and other allied health professionals who are not licensed by law to practice acupuncture cannot legally purchase acupuncture needles.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) classified acupuncture needles as Class II medical devices subject to strict regulations under the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FDCA) and FDA’s regulations. Individuals purchasing or receiving acupuncture needles who are not licensed by law to practice acupuncture are directly violating both civil and criminal provisions of the FDCA intended to protect public safety. 21 U.S.C. § 331(a)–(c), (g). These include the FDA’s requirements that acupuncture needles can only be sold to “qualified practitioners of acupuncture.” 61 Fed. Reg. 64616 (December 6, 1996). FDA prescription labeling requirements themselves specifically prohibit the sale of acupuncture needles to anyone who is not a qualified practitioner of acupuncture. The required FDA prescription labeling on the package from which acupuncture needles are to be dispensed states: “Caution: Federal law restricts this device to sale by or on the order of qualified practitioners of acupuncture as determined by the States.” 21 CFR § 801.109(b)(1) (emphasis added). Any individual who is not licensed by law to practice acupuncture is directly violating the FDCA and FDA’s civil and criminal prohibitions when they purchase or receive acupuncture needles for use in “dry needling.”

 

6. Physical therapists and other allied health professionals who are not licensed by law to practice acupuncture are using acupuncture needles to perform “dry needling.”

Physical therapists and other allied health professionals who are not licensed by law to practice acupuncture would have you believe that they are not using acupuncture needles to perform “dry needling,” when they are, in fact, using acupuncture needles, which are clearly labeled as such on the dispensing package.

 

7. Physical therapists and other allied health professionals who are not licensed by law to practice acupuncture are not qualified to perform “dry needling.”

“Dry needling” is far outside both physical therapists’ and other allied health professionals’ scope of practice and their scope of education and training. In most states, to become a licensed acupuncturist, an applicant must complete a minimum of 1,905 hours of education and supervised clinical training (1,245 hours of education and 660 hours of supervised clinical training). Yet physical therapists and other allied health professionals who are not licensed by law to practice acupuncture are inserting acupuncture needles (up to four inches or more in length) into unsuspecting patients with as little as a weekend workshop in acupuncture.

 

8. There are real risks associated with the use of acupuncture needles by physical therapists and other allied health professionals who lack the education and supervised clinical training of licensed acupuncturists.

These real risks include, but are not limited to, blood vessel, nerve and organ injury from inappropriate acupuncture needle angle and depth of insertion or from inappropriate acupuncture needle manipulation; and infection and cross infection from nonsterile acupuncture needles, poor hygiene in acupuncture needle handling, and inadequate skin preparation.

 

9. There have been recently reported cases of injury or harm from the use of acupuncture needles by physical therapists and other allied health professionals who lack the education and supervised clinical training of licensed acupuncturists.

In one such case, Emily Kuykendall, a high school teacher from Maryland, had suffered nerve damage from the use of acupuncture needles by a physical therapist. In another such case, Kim Ribble-Orr, a former Olympic athlete from Canada, had suffered a punctured lung and a pneumothorax (the presence of air in the cavity between the lungs and the chest wall, causing collapse of the lung) from the use of acupuncture needles by a massage therapist.

*If you or someone you know has suffered injury or harm from the use of acupuncture needles by a physical therapist or other allied health professional who lacked the education and supervised clinical training of licensed acupuncturists, we want to hear from you. Our phone number is 775-301-5255.

 

10. It is illegal for physical therapists or any other providers to submit claims for payment to Medicare for “dry needling” (a non-covered service) as “physical therapy” (a covered service).

Since “dry needling” is acupuncture, it is not a covered service. Use of acupuncture needles is not a covered service, whether an acupuncturist or any other provider renders the service. 42 U.S.C. § 1395y(a)(1). Its billing under Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes 97112 (neuromuscular reeducation) or 97140 (manual therapy techniques) is a misrepresentation of the actual service rendered and is considered fraud by Medicare. 31 U.S.C. §§ 3729–3733.

*If you suspect Medicare fraud, call the Medicare Fraud Hotline at 1-800-HHS-TIPS (1-800-447-8477). TTY users should call 1-800-377-4950.

*Information on this page is used with consent from the National Center for Acupuncture Safety and Integrity

http://www.acupuncturesafety.org/10Facts

 

 

 

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  1. POSTED OCTOBER 13TH, 2014 AT 7:07 PM 
    From Harvard medical school-Harvard Health Publications.
    http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/acupuncture-knee-arthritis-fails-one-test-may-still-worth-try-201410017470

    Quick Care Walk-In Medical Clinic
    Although acupuncture is indeed not endorsed by the medical community, some of our patients do report successful treatments. Thank you for an informative article.
    • POSTED OCTOBER 15TH, 2014 AT 2:23 AM

      Kino
      This is silly! many doctors ‘work’ with Acupuncture, Kinesiology, Chiropractic and more. Many in the medical profession are disillusioned by the ‘a pill for every ill and hide the symptoms’ attitude to disease which the AMA forces them to work with.
      In an editorial in the highly esteemed ‘British Medical Journal’, titled ‘Where is the Wisdom? The Poverty of Medical Evidence, BMJ’s editor Dr. Richard Smith recounts a lecture he attended with renowned health policy consultant Dr. David Eddy.Eddy found, after doing significant research, that only about 13% of medical interventions are supported by solid scientific evidence and that only 1% of the articles in medical journals are scientifically sound.Why is that? Because most of those articles quote from other articles which make unsupported and unfounded claims.

      The High Risks of the Medical Approach

      Dr. Lucian Leape, researcher at the Harvard Medical School of Public Health, also states that only 13% of medical procedures have ever been tested for appropriateness by randomized trials.
      He noted that adverse events occurred in 3.7 percent of all hospitalizations. Worse yet, 13.6 percent of those adverse events led to death!
      He is quoted as saying, “Medicine is now a high risk industry, like aviation.
      But, the chance of dying in an aviation accident is one in 2 million, while the risk of dying from a medical accident is one in 200!”
      I think I’ll take acupuncture anytime!

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OMB No. 0925-0001/0002 (Rev. 08/12 Approved Through 8/31/2015)

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

Provide the following information for the Senior/key personnel and other significant contributors.

Follow this format for each person. DO NOT EXCEED FIVE PAGES.

NAME: Fan, Arthur Yin
eRA COMMONS USER NAME (agency login):
POSITION TITLE: Independent researcher in Chinese Medicine, Licensed Acupuncturist

EDUCATION/TRAINING (Begin with baccalaureate or other initial professional education, such as nursing, include postdoctoral training and residency training if applicable.)

INSTITUTION AND LOCATION DEGREE
(if applicable)
Completion Date
MM/YYYY
FIELD OF STUDY
Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu MD 06/1986 Chinese Medicine
Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu PHD 06/1998 Chinese Internal Medicine, Brain diseases
Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing Municipal Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu Resident 07/1989 Integrative medicine
Nanjing University of Medical Science Brain Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu Other training 09/1990 Neurology
Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC Postdoctoral Fellow 08/2002 Pharmacology, toxicology in herbs, diet and nutrition supplements
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD Fellow 05/2005 Pain and inflammation; Acupuncture mechanism, herbal medicine efficacy and safety evaluation

A. Personal Statement

Arthur Yin Fan (Fan Ying) is an independent researcher and a leading specialist in Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine with about three decades of clinical experience in both Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Western medicine. He was awarded an MD degree in Chinese Medicine (1986) and a PhD in Chinese Internal Medicine (1998); he also had one additional year’s training in the neurology as well as a four-year residency combining Chinese and Western internal medicine, i.e. integrative medicine. He was the first NIH fellow in Chinese medicine in 2002-2005.

Dr. Fan has been a reviewer for medical research grants and academical papers for several peer-reviewed Journals for more than fifteen years; he has published over eighty academical papers. He was a consultant for the center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Maryland medical school. As a researcher in acupuncture, he investigated its effect and mechanism on reducing pain and inflammation. He also researched herbal medicine, nutrition supplements’ efficacy and safety at University of Maryland and Georgetown University Medical School.

Practicing in the Washington, DC-northern Virginia area since 2002, Dr. Fan employs acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine as alternative or complementary treatment for patients with various conditions. He is one of very few doctors who has both MD and PhD background (in Chinese medicine, integrative medicine). Dr. Fan holds the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM) certificate in Oriental Medicine.

From 1998 to 2001, Dr. Fan was one of the major designers and founders of Nanjing Chinese Medicine Center for Stroke, which combined the medical resources of ICU, neurology, acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, physical therapy, hyperbaric oxygen chamber, and other therapies to maximize patients’ survival and recovery in a limited time. Currently, this center is listed as one of the key stroke centers in China. This kind of integrative medicine style already has spread to every city of China since then.

  1. Talpur NA, Echard BW, Fan AY, Jaffari O, Bagchi D, Preuss HG. Antihypertensive and metabolic effects of whole Maitake mushroom powder and its fractions in two rat strains. Mol Cell Biochem. 2002 Aug;237(1-2):129-36. PubMed PMID: 12236580.
  2. Zhang RX, Lao L, Wang X, Fan A, Wang L, Ren K, Berman BM. Electroacupuncture attenuates inflammation in a rat model. J Altern Complement Med. 2005 Feb;11(1):135-42. PubMed PMID: 15750372.
  3. Fan AY, Lao L, Zhang RX, Zhou AN, Berman BM. Preclinical safety evaluation of the aqueous acetone extract of Chinese herbal formula Modified Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan. Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao. 2010 May;8(5):438-47. PubMed PMID: 20456842; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3739922.
  4. Fan AY. The methodology flaws in Hinman’s acupuncture clinical trial, part I: design and results interpretation. J Integr Med. 2015 Mar;13(2):65-8. PubMed PMID: 25797635.

B. Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

1986 – 1989 Resident doctor, Nanjing Municipal Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing
1990 – 1990 Fellow/trainee, Nanjing Brain Hospital, Nanjing University of Medical Science, Nanjing
1990 – 1995 Attending doctor, Neurology Department, Nanjing Municipal Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing
1998 – 2001 Associate Professor in Research and in Internal Medicine; Associate Chief doctor, Neurology Department, The Third Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing
2001 – 2002 Visiting researcher, postdoc, Dept. Physiology and Biophysics, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC
2002 – Independent researcher in Chinese Medicine, Licensed Acupuncturist, McLean Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, PLC, Vienna, VA
2002 – 2005 NIH Fellow in Chinese Medicine, Center for Integrative Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
2004 – 2005 Postdoc, Research assistant, Veteran Affairs Maryland Health Care , Baltimore, MD
2015 – Chair,Scientific Study & Academic Affair Committee, TCMAAA, Traditional Chinese Medicine American Alumni Association, Largo, FL

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

2008 – Member, Acupuncture Society of Virginia
2009 – 2010 Board member, Acupuncture Society of Virginia
2015 – Chair, Scientific Study & Academic Affair Committee, TCMAAA (Traditional Chinese Medicine American Alumni Association, FL, USA).

Honors

1995 Young Scientist Travel Award, International Brain Research Organization
2001 Merit award for Medical Science and Technology Advancement, Jiangsu Provincial Government, China
2011 Member, Editorial Committee, Journal of Integrative Medicine
2013 Editor, Journal of Alternative & Integrative Medicine

C. Contribution to Science

a. Acupuncture clinical trial methodology: design,sample size calculation, statistics, result interpretation
  1. Fan AY. The methodology flaws in Hinman’s acupuncture clinical trial, part I: design and results interpretation. J Integr Med. 2015 Mar;13(2):65-8. PubMed PMID: 25797635.
  2. Fan AY. The methodology flaws in Hinman’s acupuncture clinical trial, Part II: Zelen design and effectiveness dilutions. J Integr Med. 2015 May;13(3):136-9. PubMed PMID: 26006026.
b. Acupuncture mechanism study in pain and inflammation
  1. Zhang RX, Lao L, Wang X, Fan A, Wang L, Ren K, Berman BM. Electroacupuncture attenuates inflammation in a rat model. J Altern Complement Med. 2005 Feb;11(1):135-42. PubMed PMID: 15750372.
c. Herbology efficacy or herb-pharmacology: Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan; Comparing of the safety between single herb and formula
  1. Fan AY, Lao L, Zhang RX, Wang LB, Lee DY, Ma ZZ, Zhang WY, Berman B. Effects of an acetone extract of          Boswellia carterii Birdw. (Burseraceae) gum resin on rats with persistent inflammation. J Altern Complement Med. 2005 Apr;11(2):323-31. PubMed PMID: 15865500.
  2. Fan AY, Lao L, Zhang RX, Zhou AN, Wang LB, Moudgil KD, Lee DY, Ma ZZ, Zhang WY, Berman BM. Effects of an acetone extract of Boswellia carterii Birdw. (Burseraceae) gum resin on adjuvant-induced arthritis in lewis rats. J Ethnopharmacol. 2005 Oct 3;101(1-3):104-9. PubMed PMID: 15970410
  3. Lao L, Fan AY, Zhang RX, Zhou A, Ma ZZ, Lee DY, Ren K, Berman B. Anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the modified Chinese herbal formula Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan (HLXL) in rats. Am J Chin Med. 2006;34(5):833-44. PubMed PMID: 17080548.
  4. Zhang RX, Fan AY, Zhou AN, Moudgil KD, Ma ZZ, Lee DY, Fong HH, Berman BM, Lao L. Extract of the Chinese herbal formula Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan inhibited adjuvant arthritis in rats. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Jan 30;121(3):366-71. PubMed PMID: 19100323; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2818782.

d. Efficacy studies on common used herbs and dietary supplements: Maitake mushroom, Qing Gan Jie Du Dan/ Liver purifier

  1. Echard BW, Talpur NA, Fan AY, Bagchi D, Preuss HG. Hepatoprotective ability of a novel botanical formulation on mild liver injury in rats produced by acute acetaminophen and/or alcohol ingestion. Res Commun Mol Pathol Pharmacol. 2001 Jul-Aug;110(1-2):73-85. PubMed PMID: 12090358.
  2. Talpur NA, Echard BW, Fan AY, Jaffari O, Bagchi D, Preuss HG. Antihypertensive and metabolic effects of whole Maitake mushroom powder and its fractions in two rat strains. Mol Cell Biochem. 2002 Aug;237(1-2):129-36. PubMed PMID: 12236580.
  3. Rajaiah R, Lee DY, Ma Z, Fan AY, Lao L, Fong HH, Berman BM, Moudgil KD. Huo-Luo-Xiao-Ling Dan modulates antigen-directed immune response in adjuvant-induced inflammation. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 May 4;123(1):40-4. PubMed PMID: 19429337; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2925191.

e. Safety and toxicity evaluation of herbal medicine: Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan; Literature review; acute toxicity investigation and chronic toxicity evaluation; comparing the single herb and compound formula.

  1. Zhang RX, Fan AY, Zhou AN, Moudgil KD, Ma ZZ, Lee DY, Fong HH, Berman BM, Lao L. Extract of the Chinese herbal formula Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan inhibited adjuvant arthritis in rats. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Jan 30;121(3):366-71. PubMed PMID: 19100323; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2818782.
  2. Fan AY, Lao L, Zhang RX, Zhou AN, Berman BM. Preclinical safety evaluation of the aqueous acetone extract of Chinese herbal formula Modified Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan. Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao. 2010 May;8(5):438-47. PubMed PMID: 20456842; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3739922.

D. Research Support

Completed Research Support

2003/07/31-2004/07/31

Under P50-00084, which was a Feasibility Study

Fan, Arthur Yin (PI)

A Pilot Study on Yang-Deficiency Syndrome And Pain Sensitivity in Rats

Yang-Deficiency (YD, also called Deficiency-cold Syndrome/Pattern, or Yang-Xu Zheng) is a common diagnosis made by traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and other chronic pain or/and chronic inflammatory diseases (CP/CID). YD is marked by chronic cold, frailty or weakness, lethargy, and decreased sexual and reproductive ability or poor body development. TCM Yang-enhancing remedies have demonstrably and effectively corrected these chronic conditions, and the application of such remedies could improve the rehabilitation process of some chronic diseases characterized by YD. In China, YD animal models have been successfully developed by injecting large doses of steroid hormones or by removing the adrenal gland or thyroid gland in rats, mice and rabbits. However, up to now, there has been no study on pain in the YD model or the RA-YD animal model. Our study will consist of two sets of experiments. In part one we will develop YD in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats by injecting them with hydrocortisone acetate daily for one week. We will test their major physiological parameters (body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure); administer endurance tests (anti-fatigue test: 25 ºC room temperature swimming test, anti-cold test under fatigue conditions: 0ºC ice-water swimming test); and measure the functions of three endocrinological axes (cortisone; triiodothyronine [T3], thyroxine [T4]; estradiol [E2], testosterone [T]) using radioimmunoassay (RIA) plasma levels. In part two, we will test the pain sensitivity using behavioral studies (paw withdrawal latency, or PWL) in YD rats compared to normal rats. The data obtained from this study will be used for a future pain and inflammation study, for an herbal remedy study on RA and its Syndromes, and for creating a RA-YD disease-Syndrome integrated animal model.

Role: PI

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Dear Colleagues & Friends, 

As the golden weather of fall approaches us, I hope everyone is in good health and good spirits.

The Virginia Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine (VITCM) will hold a special professional development activity (PDA) on Sunday, September 25, 2011.

Based on the current NCCAOM board requirements for certificate renewal every four years, there are a few new mandatory requirements: minimal 15 credits in Key knowledge of Acupuncture and Oriental medicine, 4 credits in Safety/Ethics, 11 credits in adjunct therapies, as well as additional 30 credits in other scopes (see detail at http://www.nccaom.org/wp-content/uploads/pdf/2011%20Recertification%20Handbook.pdf, http://www.vitcm.org/?page_id=32). We applied 10 credits one day live presentation in field of Safety/Ethic and Adjunct therapies.

We invite you to participate this special PDA event, in this Seminar, you also have opportunity to watch a American documentary movie “9000 Needles”, which got a few international awards as the Best Documentary Movie.

Seminar time: 09/25/2011, 7:30AM to 5:30 PM.

Seminar address:  Potomac Community Center, 11315 Falls Road,Potomac, MD 20854 (only 20 minutes from Vienna/Falls Church); Tel: 240-777-6960.

Contact personDr. Arthur Fan,Cell:(703)499-4428.

Fee: $208 (please make check payable to VITCM), Lunch included.

Early registration before 09/15/2011: you could get 10% off (payment will be $188, please mail the check to VITCM, 8214 Old Courthouse Rd, Vienna, VA 22182). 

Agenda

7:30AM: Registration

8:00AM-9:30AM: Tai Ji Quan (Tai Chi) and its medical application

By Eugene Zhang, CMD, PhD, LAc & Arthur Fan, CMD, PhD, LAc; Tai Ji Quan in the parking lot, however it may be canceled due to rain

9:30AM-1:30PM: Safety and Ethic in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Practice

Speaker:Lixing Lao,MD, PhD, LAc

Discussion: Arthur Fan, CMD, PhD, LAc

1:30 PM- 3:30PM: Scalp Acupuncture: Prof. Shi Xuemin experience in Neurological disorders

Movie “9000 NEEDLES,” By Arthur Fan, CMD, PhD, LAc;

3:30PM-5:30PM: Cupping, Guasha and Its clinical Applications with demonstration

By Quansheng Lu, CMD, PhD, LAc.

Speakers

1. Lixing Lao, MD, PhD, LAc:Professor at the Center for Integrative Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, international well-known scholar in Acupuncture and Chinese medicine. Former Chairman, Society of Acupuncture Research.

2. Eugene Zhang, CMD, PhD, LAc: Well-known scholar and doctor in Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine, former professor of Maryland Institute of Traditional Chinese medicine (MITCM). Board member of CCAOM. An outstanding practitioner of Tai Ji Quan (Tai Chi) and Qi Gong.

3. Quasheng Lu, CMD, PhD, LAc: Well-known scholar and doctor in Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine, very skilled in the application of various TCM therapies.

4. Arthur Fan, CMD, PhD, LAc: Well-known scholar and doctor in Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine, director of Virginia Institute of Traditional Chinese medicine (VITCM). Also excellent practitioner of Tai Ji Quan (Tai Chi), Qi Gong.

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