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Jun 3, 2014 A Madam e-mail To ArthurFan@ChineseMedicineDoctor.US
Dear Dr. Fan,
I spoke with you recently over the phone about my diagnosis of oromandibular dystonia. You had asked that I send you some background, as well as my address to send an herbal remedy to that you have found works well for dystonia patients.

I was diagnosed around 9 years ago by two neurologists (Lahey Cliinic, Mass General) with task-specific oromandibular dystonia. I was doing radio broadcasting (weather reporting) for a couple of years, which involved repetitive phrases and likely- at least in part- brought on the condition. I first developed symptoms while doing the reports in a recording booth, although my conversational speech was normal (behind the microphone I had symptoms, and stepping away from the microphone I had no symptoms). The symptoms intensified over time and I eventually had to quit the broadcasting. My conversational speech eventually became impaired, and it took at least a year (or more) for the condition to go mostly back into remission. I stayed away from the broadcasting until around 10 months ago, and have only been doing a small amount of broadcasting (two hours or so) a week. I started noticing symptoms returning while working in a research lab (that is my primary job and where I spend most of my time). It was a stressful year for me, as I was trying to get a couple of projects finished so I could publish the work- I had invited a colleague of mine to be a co-first author on this work, and we ended up having many stressful, intense conversations about the work that involved constant voice projection (the lab is loud because of background noises). I’m not sure if it was a combination of stress/anxiety coupled with voice projection, and perhaps also coupled with the little bit of broadcasting I had started doing again that brought the condition back. I was also volunteering for a couple of hours a week at a preschool- which involved more voice projection. I first developed symptoms while in the lab, talking with my colleague.

Years ago when the dystonia first appeared, I received scalp acupuncture treatments based on a protocol published in a Chinese journal that showed success in 19 early Parkinson’s patients. This was successful in relieving my symptoms. I’m on the same protocol again and am receiving treatments three times a week. I had published an article in Natural Solutions Magazine (formerly Alternative Medicine Magazine) in collaboration with my acupuncturist. Below my signature is an excerpt from the article.

I was wondering if you could send me information that I could pass along to my acupuncturist that details the protocol that you use with your dystonia patients? I would also be grateful to receive the herbal remedy that you have found works well for oromandibular dystonia. My address is(omitted in this article):

Thank you kindly for your time.
Best wishes,
E
(Excerpt from the published article):
I had been placed on a Bell’s Palsy acupuncture protocol for several months, since this was- at the time- the only neurological disorder my acupuncturist was familiar with, and unfortunately one that is characteristically very different from dystonia. I was about to quit the acupuncture since it wasn’t bringing me any real benefit, when I asked her if she knew of any protocols used to treat Parkinson’s disease- the closest disorder to dystonia that I knew of. Although researchers have not found a direct link between dystonia and Parkinson’s disease, there is great interest in some of the symptom crossover, and research groups are actively trying to better understand the overlap between the two movement disorders. Since Parkinson’s and Dystonia are both neurological and result in similar signs and symptoms, it was possible that a Parkinson’s acupuncture protocol could be adapted to a dystonia patient.

My acupuncturist found a journal article that outlined a protocol that involves both body and scalp acupuncture, and which is used to treat Parkinson’s patients.1 Acupuncture can help relieve symptoms by altering blood hormone levels. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), Parkinson’s and dystonia are believed to be caused by genetics, aging, damage from excessive emotions, faulty diet, and chronic disease. Parkinson’s and Dystonia in TCM are seen as an inability of the blood and yin to nourish sinews and vessels, resulting in contraction, stiffness, and rigidity. The liver in TCM is what governs the sinews, and if the blood and yin become deficient, yang can become hyperactive, resulting in liver wind. These disorders mainly take root in the liver, but can lead to more complex presentations such as phlegm accumulation, qi and blood stagnation, and spleen and kidney deficiency. In TCM, you treat the root cause; in this case, treatment would involve settling the liver and extinguishing wind, and the manifestations, such as phlegm, stagnation, and/ or deficiency. One small study, An Acupuncture Protocol for Parkinson’s Disease,2 showed a total amelioration rate of 84.2 percent when scalp acupuncture was incorporated into an acupuncture treatment.

 

Arthur Yin Fan,CMD,PhD,LAc Jun 3,2014(E-mail) To A Madam (e-mailed me above)

Hi, E,

You may still use scalp and body acupuncture you mentioned. Take time. And also use some local points.

For herbal medicine, we have two:
(1) Pattern based herbology, heal tea.
(2) Dystonia focused herbal pills. It is called Liu Jun San capsule (100 capsule/per bottle, use 3#, 3 times a day).
It was a Chinese FDA (local branch) approved for hospital use (my former hospital).

 

A Madam Jun 3,2014 To Arthur Yin Fan,CMD,PhD,LAc

Dear Dr. Fan,

Thank you very much. I would like to try the dystonia focused herbal pills (if this is what you would recommend for my condition). I had seen a Youtube video of a gentleman with oromandibular dystonia that you had helped, whose symptoms looked (and sounded) identical to my own (lower left lip spasms, pursing of the lips, difficulty speaking). Did he take the dystonia focused herbal pills, or the pattern based herbology, heal tea?
Thank you again,

E

From: A Madam To: ArthurFan@ChineseMedicineDoctor.US
Sent: Thursday, July 10, 2014 8:19 AM
Subject: Request for more dystonia-specific herbal capsules

Dear Dr. Fan,
The herbal capsules that I received from you (Liu Jun San, 3 bottles in early June) seem to be working very well for me. My condition within two weeks of taking them went into a near remission. I still have symptoms, however my conversational speech has dramatically improved and I am even still able to do some radio broadcasting each week. I have also been doing scalp acupuncture, which might be synergistic with the capsules. I was also taking herbal teas prepared by my acupuncturist for several weeks prior to taking the capsules- She said there was some overlap in the ingredients in the teas versus what is in the capsules.

I would like to order another shipment of Liu Jun San for next month. I would actually be interested in continuing to take these capsules indefinitely, as I believe they might be effective in suppressing my symptoms. Is it possible for me to receive an automatic shipment every month, with the money taken out of my credit card each month automatically?

Thank you kindly.
Best wishes,
E

  • Jul 11 at 9:46 PM  To  Arthur Yin Fan,CMD,PhD,LAc
Wonderful! Thank you so much!
I was at a party this evening, by the way, and I was discussing my condition with someone. She said she never would have known if I hadn’t told her. I really am doing so much better- Thank you!
E

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Today, a friend told me she had acupuncture in our center for two and half weeks, lost weight 6 pounds.

Acupuncture adjusted her appetite and mood.

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Now, Let Me Tell You About my Appendectomy in Peking…

An article triggered American Acupuncture Fever, published in July 1971, before the President Nixon’s journey to China.

James Reston

Many people have heard of the 1971 New York Times article by James Reston about his experience with acupuncture in his recovery from an emergency appendectomy. Reston was in China at the time, which was quite unusual in the first place. In 1971 China was in the grip of the Cultural Revolution, and very few foreigners were allowed into the country. He had an appendectomy the standard biomedical way, but for post-surgical pain was treated with acupuncture and moxibustion:

However, I was in considerable discomfort if not pain during the second night after the operation, and Li Chang-yuan, doctor of acupuncture at the hospital, with my approval, inserted three long thin needles into the outer part of my right elbow and below my knees and manipulated them in order to stimulate the intestine and relieve the pressure and distension of the stomach.

That sent ripples of pain racing through my limbs and, at least, had the effect of diverting my attention from the distress in my stomach. Meanwhile, Doctor Li lit two pieces of an herb called ai, which looked like the burning stumps of a broken cheap cigar, and held them close to my abdomen while occasionally twirling the needles into action.

All this took about 20 minutes, during which I remember thinking that it was a rather complicated way to get rid of gas in the stomach, but there was noticeable relaxation of the pressure and distension within an hour and no recurrence of the problem thereafter.

Reston’s article provoked great interest in acupuncture. In 1976 California became the first state (Dr.Fan notes: California actually was no.8 State to license the acupuncture, in 1975, see the official article of my last article posted) to license acupuncture, where just two years earlier pioneering acupuncturist Miriam Lee was arrested for practicing medicine without a license. My martial arts teacher Dr. Alex Feng was one of the first acupuncturists licensed in California (his license number is 297 – mine is 13299).

In 2006 a Chinese publication, the People’s Daily, wrote a follow-up which had an interview with some of the original doctors mentioned in Reston’s article.

Hope you enjoy this bit of acupuncture history: Now, Let Me Tell You About My Appendectomy in Peking… (full article)

This article was from online, written by Jonah Ewell L.Ac, Kang Dao Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine, 405 Kains Ave Suite 101.510-516-3478, jonah.ewell@gmail.com

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Of pins, needles and pain relief
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It is commonly believed that acupuncture went mainstream in the United States after President Richard Nixon’s visit to China in 1972.

However, after years of research, Dr Li Yongming, president of the Traditional Chinese Medicine Association in the United States, has overturned this general consensus and announced recently that the “acupuncture fever” in the United States got started a bit earlier.

The man who started it was journalist James Reston, with his 1971 New York Times story, said Dr Li, who is organizing a series of events to mark the 35th anniversary of this incident.

Unique experience

In June 1971, Reston, a columnist and editor of The New York Times and winner of two Pulitzer Prizes, received an invitation from the Chinese Government to visit China. He arrived in Guangzhou on July 8. However, his trip was delayed and he did not set foot in Beijing until July 12.

On July 15, Reston suddenly felt a stab of pain in his groin. The next day, he checked into the Peking Union Medical College Hospital, which was then named Anti-Imperialist Hospital.

In his story entitled “Now, Let Me Tell You About My Appendectomy in Peking,” Reston blamed Henry Kissinger for his pain.

As Nixon’s National Security Adviser at that time, Kissinger arrived in Beijing on July 9 to secretly negotiate with the Chinese Government the date of President Nixon’s visit to China, and left on July 11.

As an experienced journalist, Reston felt great regret and anger at having missed a golden chance to cover such breaking news.

Reston was diagnosed as suffering from acute appendicitis and had to undergo an appendectomy.

Though the operation went off well, Reston was in considerable discomfort during the second night after the surgery. Li Zhanyuan, a doctor of acupuncture at the hospital, with Reston’s approval, inserted three long thin needles into his right elbow and below his knees.

The needles sent twinges of pain through Reston’s limbs and diverted his attention from the distress in his stomach.

Meanwhile, Dr Li lit two pieces of a herb called ai (Chinese mugwort), which looked like the burning stumps of a broken cigar, and held them close to his abdomen, while occasionally twirling the needles into action. Reston later learned that this was the procedure called moxibustion.

“All this took about 20 minutes, during which I remember thinking that it was a rather complicated way to get rid of gas in the stomach, but there was noticeable relaxation of the pressure and distension within an hour and no recurrence of the problem thereafter,” he wrote in his article.

Reston’s story appeared on the front page of The New York Times along with the Apollo 15 lift-off, on July 26, 1971.

Dr Li Yongming calls the acupuncture treatment that Reston underwent “an oriental Apollo.”

Though acupuncture had been practised in North America ever since the first immigrants came to the continent from China, it never entered the mainstream before the early 1970s, according to Li.

Reston’s article was the first genuine American experience in acupuncture to appear in the mainstream Western media.

“Several years later, after Reston’s death, I got in contact with his three sons, who remembered that their father received a lot of letters from readers to inquire about acupuncture,” said Li. He graduated from the Liaoning Traditional Chinese Medicine Institute in 1982 and has been researching both Chinese and Western medicine as attending physician at the Warren Hospital in New Jersey.

Dr Li began tracking down the persons involved in Reston’s operation, and it took him more than five years to finally locate Dr Li Zhanyuan, who retired from the Peking Union Medical College Hospital in 1995. The delay was caused by Reston who used the old Western way to spell the Chinese names.

Li Zhanyuan, who is in his 70s, retains his love for acupuncture, training young practitioners in a vocational skills education centre in Beijing.

Interestingly, even while telling his students the story of acupuncture’s spread to the United States, he ignored the Reston story.

“I never expected Reston’s experience with the silver needles to evoke such a strong response in America,” he said.

Thousands of young acupuncturists like Dr Li Zhanyuan were trained after the founding of the People’s Republic of China to provide inexpensive medical care for the vast rural population. Owing to the strong support of the government, acupuncture enjoyed its strongest development in those years in China.

Viable alternative

“Research on acupuncture anaesthesia has played an important role in the spread of acupuncture in the US. It has attracted people’s attention to its pain-relieving effects,” said Dr Li Yongming.

Although the acupuncture fever cooled after the initial burst of enthusiasm, the treatment retained its influence in the United States. In the 1990s, there was a resurgence of interest, as more Americans began paying greater attention to alternative medicine.

“People started to get sick of the side-effects of Western medicine and turned to effective and safe non-medicinal therapies,” said Dr Li.

In 1997, the US National Institute of Health (NIH) concluded that acupuncture provided effective therapy for certain medical conditions, especially post-operative nausea and pain as well as vomiting. It said acupuncture was remarkably safe, with less side effects than many well-established therapies.

Cao Xiaoding, director of the Research Department of Acupuncture under the WHO Collaborating Centre for Traditional Medicine, has been studying acupuncture analgesia since 1964.

She was one of the three Chinese acupuncture experts invited to take part in the 1997 hearing on acupuncture conducted by the US NIH.

She said acupuncture was being applied widely in Western countries to alleviate pain. As acupuncture also helps regulate body functions, it can help conditions such as high blood pressure, arthritis, myasthenia and paralysis.

According to Dr Li Yongming, allocations of research funds for acupuncture from the USNIH have been increasing every year. It now accounts for nearly half of TCM research funds, which in turn account for a quarter of the total funds earmarked for Complimentary and Alternative Medicine.

Currently, the US has about 20,000 acupuncturists and 5,000 physician acupuncturists. More than 30 states have laws dealing with acupuncture.

“One can find acupuncture advertisements in the yellow pages in any hotel in the United States,” said Dr Li.

Reston himself might have never imagined that one day acupuncture would find such wide acceptance in his country while penning his article from a hospital bed 35 years ago.

Source: China Daily    http://english.people.com.cn/200602/16/eng20060216_243273.html

 

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Acupuncture helped the mother overcome the migraine and hypertension during pregnancy

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Mr. D. N.,80 years old,  had a stroke in last November (year 2011), the stroke affected  function of his celebellum and stem.  The main problem is dizziness and hearing loss. He had ten acupuncture treatments and’several months physical therapies, did not feel significant improvement.

On August 21,2012, patient started to see me. When he came, he was very dizzy, even the position change, such as  lying down and/or sitting up, causing severe dizziness. He had to use a cane to help the balance, his daughter or son helps his walk too.  For his hearing loss, he said he could answer the phone only when the speaker is on; he could not hear the door-bell ringing and the touch-tone sound of the phone.

After our 4 acupuncture treatments, his dizziness decreased at least 50% and walking much better, faster and balance better,don’t need other to help him; and hearing better.

After 6 treatments, he could hear the door-bell ringing and touch-tone sound of the phone. Very happy and said at least 50% improving. Currently, he is still under extensive acupuncture treatments in our office.

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Dr. Fan,
I hope you remember me, Simara. I used to go to your office for my bad back pain every weekend. I had an emergency at home with my father who got really ill and eventually passed away. I had to stay at home to take care for some things with my mother and the stay I had envisioned prolonged for a little bit. I just wanted to tell you thank you from the bottom of my heart beacuse you really made me feel better and whenever I couldn’t walk whenever I came into your office, an hour later I felt like it never happened. You really care for your patients and you are a really sweet man. I can honestly say you’re the best doctor I’ve ever had and I think you cured my back pain because thru all this time I haven’t been in Virginia, my back doesn’t bother me anymore. I will be back but I just wanted to let you know how grateful I am for basically curing me.
I also want to say that your assistant April, she is the sweetest, most attentive and professional person I’ve ever met. I miss you guys very much and hopefully I will be back very soon. I will go by the office to say hi.
Dr. Fan, thank you so much for being the man that you are and I hope you keep working healing people for a long, long, long time. Xie Xié.
Simara C.
Dr.Arthur Fan notes: acupuncture is one of most effective therapies in low back pain management, according to clinical trials and long term clinical practice.

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September 6, 2012

Doctor Fan,

I want to thank you for using your expert acupuncture techniques to solve my long lasting Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS).

Traditional medicine did not work and your remedies have allowed me to sleep well at night.

Thank you very much.

Sincerely,

P. A.

Dr.Arthur fan notes: after acupuncture, patient feels no longer have restless leg syndrome, and migraine gone, sleep very soundly.

And, very important the mood much calm.

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This morning, a lady reported her pregnancy test strong positive–got pregnant. This is no.65 patient got pregnant, since 2007, by our acupuncture treatments.

She is 33 years old, married for 6 years, and tried seriously to get conceive for over one years. According to her, her husband is healthy and the sperm test was good. She also has a lot acne, so she hope we could adjust her hormones for both acne and fertility.

When she first saw me, she was in day 14 of her period cycle (she had  28-days-cycles before). I gave her acupuncture according to our protocol, and herb pills. after 8 sessions acupuncture, she felt her cervical mucus is slippery and very stretchable, better than before. after another two weeks, her period didn’t come. Then her pregnancy test became positive.

 

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My patients and many others sometime want to know what is the difference between IVF and acupuncture in infertility treatments.

Actually, the difference is significant.

1. IVF, using artificial procedure to help the infertility couple to get baby(s). It is a procedure with the external help(doctors) and get “pregnancy”, like a game.  And, sometime, using donor’s egg or sperm. The result could know in one month. If you see the patient has bleeding after some days post the procedure(embryo transferring), the IVF is failed.

2. Acupuncture, adjusts the hormones and improving the function, which makes patient become a normal people. And then she could get pregnancy in any cycle.

Yesterday, one patient told me she got pregnancy after our acupuncture treatments.

 

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Dear colleagues & Friends,

A Spring seminar will be hold by Virginia Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine (VITCM) on April 1, 2012, Sunday. Hope everyone will arrange time to attend, and share your knowledge and experience.

Topics: The Western Diagnosis, TCM Treatments and Research Updates of Common Skin Diseases; Yellow Emperor’s Classics of Internal Medicine.

Location:Potomac Community Center, 11315 Falls Road,Potomac, Maryland 20854;Tel: 240-777-6960.

Skin problems, which affect more than 10 million Americans, can be one of the most frustrating and stubborn group of symptoms to successfully treat. Many pharmaceutical solutions offer quick relief but do not provide a lasting solution, and come with risks such as toxic build-up in the body and weakening of other organ systems. Therefore, more and more people are choosing alternative solutions such as Chinese Medicine, which can be safer and which intends to address the root cause of the symptom instead of covering it up each time it appears. In fact, dermatology is a recognized specialty in traditional Chinese Medicine. Treatments for skin disorders have been described as early as 1100-221 BC in China.  Acupuncture and Chinese herbs offer a natural solution to improving skin conditions with its sophisticated system, both external and internal administration. There are hundreds of herbal formulas available for skin disorders such as herpes, eczema, and psoriasis.

Fee: $208. (Mail check before March 15, 2012, discount rate at $188).

Contact Person: Dr. Arthur Fan,Tel:(703)499-4428, e-mail: ChineseMedicineInstitute@gmail.com. Address: VITCM,8214 Old Courthouse Rd,Vienna, VA 22182.

Lecture Details (included in lecture and discussion):

8:00AM-9:30AM: Tai Chi and Medical Applications. By Drs. Eugene Zhang, Arthur Fan (Outside, in Parking lot; if rain or snow, cancel). 

9:30AM-1:30PM: Western Diagnosis & TCM Management for Common Skin Diseases. By Dr. Yongming Li (this special lecture outline is available in the Blog part)

1:30 PM- 3:00PM:  TCM and Skin Disorder: An Update on Clinical Research. By Dr. Lixing Lao.

3:00PM-5:30PM: Yellow Emperor’s Classics of Internal Medicine: Four Seasons, Five Organs, Yin Yang and Related Experiments. By Dr. Quansheng Lu

Instructors

Dr.Lixing Lao,  CMD, PhD, LAc, Professor of Family Medicine, Director of Traditional Chinese Medicine Research, Center for Integrative Medicine,University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore,MD.

Dr. Lao graduated from Shanghai University of TCM (MD in Chinese medicine) and completed his PhD in physiology at the University of Maryland at Baltimore. He has practiced acupuncture and Chinese medicine for more than 20 years, and has been awarded numerous grants from the NIH and the U.S. Department of Defense to conduct research on acupuncture and alternative medicine. He presents frequently at national and international conferences, including the seminal 1997 NIH Consensus Development Conference on Acupuncture and the White House Commission on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Policy. He was board cochair of the Society for Acupuncture Research, chief editor of American Acupuncturist, the official journal of American Association of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.

Dr.Lao was one of funders and professor of former Maryland Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine (MITCM), which was a well-known school in TCM education during 1990s to 2000s. Currently, he is the honor president and main lecturer of VITCM.

Dr. Eugene Zhang, CMD, PhD, LAc. has been practicing acupuncture for over 15 years, and is a graduate of famous oriental medical school in the world: the Beijing University of TCM.

In China, Eugene Zhang was a Medical Doctor (MD in Chinese Medicine); here in  US he is one of the top Licensed Acupuncturists inVirginia,Maryland and Washington DC. area. He was a well-respected professor and Clinical Supervisor for the prestigious Maryland Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine (MITCM). Because of his years of experience, he serves as a consultant for the council of Colleges of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (CCAOM).

Dr. Zhang is also a senior Taiji (Tai Chi) and Qigong Instructor, both in the United Statesand in China. He has written a detailed book, “The Ultimate Exercise for Mind and Body” that explains the benefits of Qigong and shows pictorially the different body postures.

Dr. Yongming Li, MD, PhD, LAc (in New York and New Jersey). Our guest speaker.

Dr.Li is a leading doctor in both Chinese medicine and Western medicine. He graduated from Liao-ning college of TCM in 1983, and got PhD, MD in USA.

He is a well-known doctor in dermatology, doctor and scholar in the field of acupuncture and Oriental medicine with more 20 years’ clinical experience. Currently, he also serves as a NIH grant reviewer. He was the president of American Traditional Chinese Medicine Society, which has more than 700 members in New York area.

He has published many academic papers and books,included in “Acupuncture Journey to America”, a new published book in acupuncture history.

Dr. Quansheng Lu, CMD, PhD, L. Ac. Dr.Lu is a licensed acupuncturist in Maryland. He graduated from Henan University of TCM in China and subsequently worked as a resident and attending physician of TCM at a general hospital in China for 8 years. During this period, thousands of patients recovered under his treatment.  Given his outstanding contribution in TCM, Dr. Lu was awarded the Outstanding Doctor Award from the Local government. Dr. Lu pursued his master degree in TCM at Beijing University of TCM.

He continued to expand his education and later received a  PhD in cardiology in Chinese and western integrated medicine  at the China Academy of Chinese medical science. He focused on exploring hypertension molecular mechanisms and looked for new anti-hypertensive natural herbs. His supervisor is Professor Keji Chen; president of The Chinese Association of Integrated Medicine, and academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Dr. Lu was a postdoctoral fellow at Georgetown University Medical Center and Children’s National Medical Center.

Dr. Arthur Yin Fan (Fan Ying),PhD, CMD, LAc, a leading specialist in Acupuncture and Chinese herbology, has more than two decades of clinical experience in both Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Western medicine. In China, he was awarded an M.D. degree in TCM and a Ph.D. in Chinese internal medicine from famous Nanjing University of TCM. He completed additional one year’s training in the Western medicine diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders as well as a six-year medical residency combining TCM and Western internal medicine. He was a medical doctor in both TCM and coventional medicine when he worked in a University hospital in China. He was the funder of  Nanjing Stroke Center which is now a China national key center in Stroke rescuing and rehabilitation.

An evaluator of medical science research grant applications for many countries, Dr. Fan is currently a consultant for the Complementary and Alternative Medicine program at the University of Maryland medical school. He has also conducted CAM research for the Georgetown University medical school’s programs in nutrition and herbology.

Dr. Fan holds the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM) certificate in Oriental Medicine, which comprises Acupuncture, Chinese Herbology and Asian Bodywork. Dr.Fan was awarded the third place prize in Taiji-quan (Tai Chi) in China first national health-sport congress (1985,Shenyang,China). Dr.Fan is the funder of VITCM.

Ron Elkayam, MSTCM, graduated from the Academy of Chinese Culture and Health Sciences in Oakland,California in 2004 where he studied acupuncture and Chinese medicine. While still in school studying Chinese Medicine,  Ron studied with Robert Levine, L.Ac., in Berkeley, where he furthered his understanding of acupuncture, herbal formulas, diagnosis, and pulse taking. Inspired to take his learning to a new level, he moved to Taiwan in 2005 to learn Mandarin as a way of deepening his studies in Chinese medicine.Over the course of almost five years, Ron studied Mandarin in universities in Taipei, Shanghai, and Beijing, received advanced Mandarin language certification, and worked in hospitals (Guanganmen,Tonren hospitals) as interns, where he was able to communicate with doctors and patients in their native language and gain useful clinical experience.

Ron has a background in mind-body disciplines and has a 2nd kyu (brown belt) in aikido. He has also studied qigong (Wild Goose style), taiji (Wu and Chen styles), and Kripalu yoga. He also believes in the importance of diet and exercise in helping patients reach optimum health and happiness.

In late 2010, Ron finally returned to theU.S.to bring his clinical experience to American patients.  He has NCCAOM certification in acupuncture and herbal medicine, in addition to being licensed inVirginia,California, and Rhode Island. Ron is originally from Baltimore,MD.At present time, he works part-time to assist VITCM’s daily work.

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“Incredible, my daughter could sleep well and did not have hives again after first-time drinking of the herbal tea you prescribed. Just very slight in the second and the third day’s night. In one word, she has significant improvement, and will get cured.” the patient’s mom said in an e-mail to Dr.Arthur Fan.

This kid has hives several months, esp. during the night- time. Patient had a lot of hives all over the body, affecting her sleeping. Every interesting, the hives disappeared in morning automatically. During the day-time, patient had hives very occasionally.

 “难以置信,您开的药吃的第一夜我女儿就安睡,没有起荨麻疹。第二天下午有一些,但白天好办,玩儿一会儿引开注意力就没事了。第二夜有一点儿。第三夜好好的,一夜无话。总之明显好转,痊愈在即。

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Dr.Arthur Fan has been rated as one of  “top acupuncturists” in Washington DC and northern Virginia area in the Website: www.RateMDs.com.

http://www.ratemds.com/filecache/topTen.jsp?city=WASHINGTON&sid=8

Best Rated Acupuncturists in WASHINGTON, DC
1 Tetsuhiro Ueno – Arlington
2 Yong Chen – Bethesda
3 ARTHUR FAN – VIENNA
4 SUZZANNE LOHR – WASHINGTON
5 ROCCO MANZIANO – SILVER SPRING
6 BK Mudahar – Washington
7 KERRI WESTHAUSER – BETHESDA
8 Wei Peng – BETHESDA

Best Rated Acupuncturists in herndon, VA
1 Tetsuhiro Ueno – Arlington
2 ARTHUR FAN – VIENNA
3 James Larmour – FAIRFAX
4 Rachal Lohr-Dean – Chantilly
5 SATORI POCH – RICHMOND
6 EUGENE ZHANG – FAIRFAX

Best Rated Acupuncturists in mclean, VA
1 Tetsuhiro Ueno – Arlington
2 ARTHUR FAN – VIENNA
3 James Larmour – FAIRFAX
4 SUZZANNE LOHR – WASHINGTON
5 BK Mudahar – Washington
6 SATORI POCH – RICHMOND
7 EUGENE ZHANG – FAIRFAX

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Acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine is very effective in Guillain-Barre Syndrome’s recovery in some cases.

Here we have a case record in video, I hope patients with Guillain-Barre Syndrome don’t get frustrated, use acupuncture or/and Chinese herbal medicine as early as possible, in most of cases, very good.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Ngu5WrPDcE&feature=youtu.be

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