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Info from: https://www.daocloud.com/acupuncture/cost

As you can imagine, the cost of acupuncture varies from city to city and from one acupuncturist to the next. In this article, we’ll explore the kinds of costs you can expect when you seek treatment, the types of discounts you may be eligible for, how to find low-cost acupuncture using community clinics, and acupuncture costs in some of the major cities.

If you’re looking to use insurance, we’ll reveal which insurance companies will pay for acupuncture treatment, And if you’re looking for a specific treatment for weight loss, back pain, infertility, or migraines, we’ll also give you an idea of what you can expect to pay for those treatments.

Contents

  1. How Much Does Acupuncture Cost?
  2. Typical Costs
  3. Discounts
  4. Total cost
  5. How to find low cost acupuncture (please consider the quality before consider low cost)
  6.  Which insurance companies cover acupuncture?
  7.  Acupuncture Cost by City
  8.  Cost by treatment type
  9.  For infertility
  10.  For Weight Loss
  11.  For Back Pain
  12.  For Migraines
  13.  Additional costs to consider
  14.  Tips for shopping for acupuncture
  15.  Frequently Asked Questions
  16.  Does medicare cover acupuncture?
  17.  Does medicaid cover acupuncture?
  18.  Do Medicare supplemental insurance plans cover acupuncture?
  19.  Will my insurance cover acupuncture?

Typical Costs

Fees for your first session of acupuncture may include an initial consultation, medical exam, and acupuncture treatment. This will cost between $120 to $240. Additional visits may cost $75 to $160.

Discounts

Many acupuncturists offer a discount when you purchase multiple treatments. So for example, if you were to purchase one session at $150 or six sessions at $600, bringing the price down to $100 per session.

Other popular discounts are:

  • Student discounts
  • Senior discounts
  • Child discounts

Ask your acupuncturist if they offer any of these discounts to get a better price on your treatments. For example, in Atlanta, an acupuncture treatment will cost $120, but a student discount brings it to $85, and for a child, it’s only $65.

Total cost

According to consumer reports , people spent more than $200 out of pocket over the course of their full treatment for acupuncture and almost one in four spent $500 or more.

How to find low cost acupuncture

Non-profit community acupuncture clinics are gaining popularity. These clinics, like Phoenix Community Acupuncture , offer low cost acupuncture on a sliding scale, $17-$35. Look for a community acupuncture clinic in your area to find low cost acupuncture.

Which insurance companies cover acupuncture?

The following insurance companies may cover your acupuncture, depending on your plan. Be sure to check with your insurance provider to verify coverage before seeking treatment. Your acupuncturist may also be able to assist you.

  • Aetna
  • Blue Cross/Blue Shield
  • Cigna
  • Humana
  • Johns Hopkins EHP
  • Kennedy Krieger’s Core Source
  • Landmark
  • Optum
  • United Health Care

Acupuncture Cost by City

Methodology

These prices estimate the costs you may expect to pay for acupuncture without insurance. To determine these prices, we sampled acupuncturists listed in the Google business directory in each area.

Cost by City

City Acupuncture Session Cost
Atlanta $80
Austin $85
Baltimore $90
Boston $100
Charlotte $80
Chicago $95
Cincinnati $100
Cleveland $85
Columbus $75
Dallas $85
Denver $125
Houston $160
Indianapolis $95
Kansas City $75
Las Vegas $70
Los Angeles $120
Louisville $85
Memphis $75
Miami $120
Milwaukee $90
Minneapolis $120
Nashville $100
New Orleans $85
New York $300
Oklahoma City $75
Philadelphia $95
Phoenix $75
Portland $150
Raleigh $75
Richmond $90
Salt Lake City $75
San Diego $108
San Francisco $150
San Jose $85
Seattle $135
St Louis $60
Tampa $125
Washington DC $160

Cost by treatment type

For infertility

If you suffer from infertility, plan to pay a lot of money to increase your chances of getting pregnant. A typical acupuncture program for fertility might last three to six months, with treatments every week. Plan for a major portion of your expenses upfront with various diagnostic tests running from $160 to $325, which may include:

  • Male hormone panel
  • Female hormone panel
  • Estrogen ratio test
  • Adrenal salivary index
  • Salivary food sensitivity panel

Sample infertility costs

Initial Visit $150

Female hormone panel $325

Estrogen ratio test $200

Herbs ($150 monthly) $900

Weekly acupuncture for 6 months $1,680

___________________________________________________________________

Total Cost $3,255

For Weight Loss

If you need to lose some weight, acupuncture could help. Weekly acupuncture was shown to improve weight loss in this study. If you figure three months of acupuncture to accompany your exercise regime, you’d spend $840 or more depending on the per session cost.

For Back Pain

If you consider testimonial and anecdotal evidence, some people have used acupuncture to become free from pain in has few as 24 sessions. If you figure on a cost per session of $70 to $150, that amounts to $1,680 to $3,600.

However, some research suggests the effects of acupuncture on pain are temporary. In this case, you might need weekly acupuncture on an ongoing basis, resulting in a cost of $280 to $600 monthly for your back pain.

For Migraines

The same situation is true from migraines as back pain. Considering that you may need ongoing acupuncture treatment to relieve the pain associated with you migraines and keep them at bay, you may need to plan on spending anywhere from $280 to $1200 for weekly or bi-weekly acupuncture treatment.

Additional costs to consider

Here are some additional costs you may need to consider before purchasing an acupuncture treatment.

  • Herbs and supplements. Many acupuncture clinics will recommend patients take Chinese herbs or other supplements as part of their treatment program. These will always cost additional money above and beyond your acupuncture treatment, ranging from $30 to $150 monthly.
  • Tui Na. Your treatment may begin with an optional Tui Na session. This is similar to massage, but with a therapeutic emphasis, rather than relaxation. You may be charged extra for Tui Na.
  • Gratuity. With most bodywork, you may be expected to leave a tip for your practitioner; somewhere between 10-20%. Some clinics encourage gratuity while others discourage it.

Tips for shopping for acupuncture

  1. Ask your friends for a recommendation.
  2. Research online.
  3. Read online reviews.
  4. Understand the practitioners training and specializations.
  5. Call and ask for an introductory session. (Don’t forget to ask about what insurance they take)
  6. Go to your first appointment and evaluate the doctor and the office.
  7. Make a decision to return or keep looking for an acupuncturist you like.

Frequently Asked Questions

Does medicare cover acupuncture?

No. Medicare does not cover acupuncture.

Does medicaid cover acupuncture?

No. Medicaid does not cover acupuncture

Do Medicare supplemental insurance plans cover acupuncture?

Some Medicare supplemental insurance plans provide coverage for acupuncture treatment but most don’t offer coverage.

Will my insurance cover acupuncture?

While many insurance companies are beginning to cover acupuncture, most plans that do are higher cost plans. If you have had chronic pain for six months and the traditional forms of treatment, like drugs or physical therapy have been ineffective, there’s a higher chance your insurance will cover your acupuncture treatments.

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Jun 3, 2014 A Madam e-mail To ArthurFan@ChineseMedicineDoctor.US
Dear Dr. Fan,
I spoke with you recently over the phone about my diagnosis of oromandibular dystonia. You had asked that I send you some background, as well as my address to send an herbal remedy to that you have found works well for dystonia patients.

I was diagnosed around 9 years ago by two neurologists (Lahey Cliinic, Mass General) with task-specific oromandibular dystonia. I was doing radio broadcasting (weather reporting) for a couple of years, which involved repetitive phrases and likely- at least in part- brought on the condition. I first developed symptoms while doing the reports in a recording booth, although my conversational speech was normal (behind the microphone I had symptoms, and stepping away from the microphone I had no symptoms). The symptoms intensified over time and I eventually had to quit the broadcasting. My conversational speech eventually became impaired, and it took at least a year (or more) for the condition to go mostly back into remission. I stayed away from the broadcasting until around 10 months ago, and have only been doing a small amount of broadcasting (two hours or so) a week. I started noticing symptoms returning while working in a research lab (that is my primary job and where I spend most of my time). It was a stressful year for me, as I was trying to get a couple of projects finished so I could publish the work- I had invited a colleague of mine to be a co-first author on this work, and we ended up having many stressful, intense conversations about the work that involved constant voice projection (the lab is loud because of background noises). I’m not sure if it was a combination of stress/anxiety coupled with voice projection, and perhaps also coupled with the little bit of broadcasting I had started doing again that brought the condition back. I was also volunteering for a couple of hours a week at a preschool- which involved more voice projection. I first developed symptoms while in the lab, talking with my colleague.

Years ago when the dystonia first appeared, I received scalp acupuncture treatments based on a protocol published in a Chinese journal that showed success in 19 early Parkinson’s patients. This was successful in relieving my symptoms. I’m on the same protocol again and am receiving treatments three times a week. I had published an article in Natural Solutions Magazine (formerly Alternative Medicine Magazine) in collaboration with my acupuncturist. Below my signature is an excerpt from the article.

I was wondering if you could send me information that I could pass along to my acupuncturist that details the protocol that you use with your dystonia patients? I would also be grateful to receive the herbal remedy that you have found works well for oromandibular dystonia. My address is(omitted in this article):

Thank you kindly for your time.
Best wishes,
E
(Excerpt from the published article):
I had been placed on a Bell’s Palsy acupuncture protocol for several months, since this was- at the time- the only neurological disorder my acupuncturist was familiar with, and unfortunately one that is characteristically very different from dystonia. I was about to quit the acupuncture since it wasn’t bringing me any real benefit, when I asked her if she knew of any protocols used to treat Parkinson’s disease- the closest disorder to dystonia that I knew of. Although researchers have not found a direct link between dystonia and Parkinson’s disease, there is great interest in some of the symptom crossover, and research groups are actively trying to better understand the overlap between the two movement disorders. Since Parkinson’s and Dystonia are both neurological and result in similar signs and symptoms, it was possible that a Parkinson’s acupuncture protocol could be adapted to a dystonia patient.

My acupuncturist found a journal article that outlined a protocol that involves both body and scalp acupuncture, and which is used to treat Parkinson’s patients.1 Acupuncture can help relieve symptoms by altering blood hormone levels. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), Parkinson’s and dystonia are believed to be caused by genetics, aging, damage from excessive emotions, faulty diet, and chronic disease. Parkinson’s and Dystonia in TCM are seen as an inability of the blood and yin to nourish sinews and vessels, resulting in contraction, stiffness, and rigidity. The liver in TCM is what governs the sinews, and if the blood and yin become deficient, yang can become hyperactive, resulting in liver wind. These disorders mainly take root in the liver, but can lead to more complex presentations such as phlegm accumulation, qi and blood stagnation, and spleen and kidney deficiency. In TCM, you treat the root cause; in this case, treatment would involve settling the liver and extinguishing wind, and the manifestations, such as phlegm, stagnation, and/ or deficiency. One small study, An Acupuncture Protocol for Parkinson’s Disease,2 showed a total amelioration rate of 84.2 percent when scalp acupuncture was incorporated into an acupuncture treatment.

 

Arthur Yin Fan,CMD,PhD,LAc Jun 3,2014(E-mail) To A Madam (e-mailed me above)

Hi, E,

You may still use scalp and body acupuncture you mentioned. Take time. And also use some local points.

For herbal medicine, we have two:
(1) Pattern based herbology, heal tea.
(2) Dystonia focused herbal pills. It is called Liu Jun San capsule (100 capsule/per bottle, use 3#, 3 times a day).
It was a Chinese FDA (local branch) approved for hospital use (my former hospital).

 

A Madam Jun 3,2014 To Arthur Yin Fan,CMD,PhD,LAc

Dear Dr. Fan,

Thank you very much. I would like to try the dystonia focused herbal pills (if this is what you would recommend for my condition). I had seen a Youtube video of a gentleman with oromandibular dystonia that you had helped, whose symptoms looked (and sounded) identical to my own (lower left lip spasms, pursing of the lips, difficulty speaking). Did he take the dystonia focused herbal pills, or the pattern based herbology, heal tea?
Thank you again,

E

From: A Madam To: ArthurFan@ChineseMedicineDoctor.US
Sent: Thursday, July 10, 2014 8:19 AM
Subject: Request for more dystonia-specific herbal capsules

Dear Dr. Fan,
The herbal capsules that I received from you (Liu Jun San, 3 bottles in early June) seem to be working very well for me. My condition within two weeks of taking them went into a near remission. I still have symptoms, however my conversational speech has dramatically improved and I am even still able to do some radio broadcasting each week. I have also been doing scalp acupuncture, which might be synergistic with the capsules. I was also taking herbal teas prepared by my acupuncturist for several weeks prior to taking the capsules- She said there was some overlap in the ingredients in the teas versus what is in the capsules.

I would like to order another shipment of Liu Jun San for next month. I would actually be interested in continuing to take these capsules indefinitely, as I believe they might be effective in suppressing my symptoms. Is it possible for me to receive an automatic shipment every month, with the money taken out of my credit card each month automatically?

Thank you kindly.
Best wishes,
E

  • Jul 11 at 9:46 PM  To  Arthur Yin Fan,CMD,PhD,LAc
Wonderful! Thank you so much!
I was at a party this evening, by the way, and I was discussing my condition with someone. She said she never would have known if I hadn’t told her. I really am doing so much better- Thank you!
E

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Today, a friend told me she had acupuncture in our center for two and half weeks, lost weight 6 pounds.

Acupuncture adjusted her appetite and mood.

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OMB No. 0925-0001/0002 (Rev. 08/12 Approved Through 8/31/2015)

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

Provide the following information for the Senior/key personnel and other significant contributors.

Follow this format for each person. DO NOT EXCEED FIVE PAGES.

NAME: Fan, Arthur Yin
eRA COMMONS USER NAME (agency login):
POSITION TITLE: Independent researcher in Chinese Medicine, Licensed Acupuncturist

EDUCATION/TRAINING (Begin with baccalaureate or other initial professional education, such as nursing, include postdoctoral training and residency training if applicable.)

INSTITUTION AND LOCATION DEGREE
(if applicable)
Completion Date
MM/YYYY
FIELD OF STUDY
Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu MD 06/1986 Chinese Medicine
Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu PHD 06/1998 Chinese Internal Medicine, Brain diseases
Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing Municipal Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu Resident 07/1989 Integrative medicine
Nanjing University of Medical Science Brain Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu Other training 09/1990 Neurology
Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC Postdoctoral Fellow 08/2002 Pharmacology, toxicology in herbs, diet and nutrition supplements
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD Fellow 05/2005 Pain and inflammation; Acupuncture mechanism, herbal medicine efficacy and safety evaluation

A. Personal Statement

Arthur Yin Fan (Fan Ying) is an independent researcher and a leading specialist in Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine with about three decades of clinical experience in both Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Western medicine. He was awarded an MD degree in Chinese Medicine (1986) and a PhD in Chinese Internal Medicine (1998); he also had one additional year’s training in the neurology as well as a four-year residency combining Chinese and Western internal medicine, i.e. integrative medicine. He was the first NIH fellow in Chinese medicine in 2002-2005.

Dr. Fan has been a reviewer for medical research grants and academical papers for several peer-reviewed Journals for more than fifteen years; he has published over eighty academical papers. He was a consultant for the center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Maryland medical school. As a researcher in acupuncture, he investigated its effect and mechanism on reducing pain and inflammation. He also researched herbal medicine, nutrition supplements’ efficacy and safety at University of Maryland and Georgetown University Medical School.

Practicing in the Washington, DC-northern Virginia area since 2002, Dr. Fan employs acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine as alternative or complementary treatment for patients with various conditions. He is one of very few doctors who has both MD and PhD background (in Chinese medicine, integrative medicine). Dr. Fan holds the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM) certificate in Oriental Medicine.

From 1998 to 2001, Dr. Fan was one of the major designers and founders of Nanjing Chinese Medicine Center for Stroke, which combined the medical resources of ICU, neurology, acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, physical therapy, hyperbaric oxygen chamber, and other therapies to maximize patients’ survival and recovery in a limited time. Currently, this center is listed as one of the key stroke centers in China. This kind of integrative medicine style already has spread to every city of China since then.

  1. Talpur NA, Echard BW, Fan AY, Jaffari O, Bagchi D, Preuss HG. Antihypertensive and metabolic effects of whole Maitake mushroom powder and its fractions in two rat strains. Mol Cell Biochem. 2002 Aug;237(1-2):129-36. PubMed PMID: 12236580.
  2. Zhang RX, Lao L, Wang X, Fan A, Wang L, Ren K, Berman BM. Electroacupuncture attenuates inflammation in a rat model. J Altern Complement Med. 2005 Feb;11(1):135-42. PubMed PMID: 15750372.
  3. Fan AY, Lao L, Zhang RX, Zhou AN, Berman BM. Preclinical safety evaluation of the aqueous acetone extract of Chinese herbal formula Modified Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan. Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao. 2010 May;8(5):438-47. PubMed PMID: 20456842; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3739922.
  4. Fan AY. The methodology flaws in Hinman’s acupuncture clinical trial, part I: design and results interpretation. J Integr Med. 2015 Mar;13(2):65-8. PubMed PMID: 25797635.

B. Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

1986 – 1989 Resident doctor, Nanjing Municipal Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing
1990 – 1990 Fellow/trainee, Nanjing Brain Hospital, Nanjing University of Medical Science, Nanjing
1990 – 1995 Attending doctor, Neurology Department, Nanjing Municipal Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing
1998 – 2001 Associate Professor in Research and in Internal Medicine; Associate Chief doctor, Neurology Department, The Third Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing
2001 – 2002 Visiting researcher, postdoc, Dept. Physiology and Biophysics, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC
2002 – Independent researcher in Chinese Medicine, Licensed Acupuncturist, McLean Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, PLC, Vienna, VA
2002 – 2005 NIH Fellow in Chinese Medicine, Center for Integrative Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
2004 – 2005 Postdoc, Research assistant, Veteran Affairs Maryland Health Care , Baltimore, MD
2015 – Chair,Scientific Study & Academic Affair Committee, TCMAAA, Traditional Chinese Medicine American Alumni Association, Largo, FL

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

2008 – Member, Acupuncture Society of Virginia
2009 – 2010 Board member, Acupuncture Society of Virginia
2015 – Chair, Scientific Study & Academic Affair Committee, TCMAAA (Traditional Chinese Medicine American Alumni Association, FL, USA).

Honors

1995 Young Scientist Travel Award, International Brain Research Organization
2001 Merit award for Medical Science and Technology Advancement, Jiangsu Provincial Government, China
2011 Member, Editorial Committee, Journal of Integrative Medicine
2013 Editor, Journal of Alternative & Integrative Medicine

C. Contribution to Science

a. Acupuncture clinical trial methodology: design,sample size calculation, statistics, result interpretation
  1. Fan AY. The methodology flaws in Hinman’s acupuncture clinical trial, part I: design and results interpretation. J Integr Med. 2015 Mar;13(2):65-8. PubMed PMID: 25797635.
  2. Fan AY. The methodology flaws in Hinman’s acupuncture clinical trial, Part II: Zelen design and effectiveness dilutions. J Integr Med. 2015 May;13(3):136-9. PubMed PMID: 26006026.
b. Acupuncture mechanism study in pain and inflammation
  1. Zhang RX, Lao L, Wang X, Fan A, Wang L, Ren K, Berman BM. Electroacupuncture attenuates inflammation in a rat model. J Altern Complement Med. 2005 Feb;11(1):135-42. PubMed PMID: 15750372.
c. Herbology efficacy or herb-pharmacology: Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan; Comparing of the safety between single herb and formula
  1. Fan AY, Lao L, Zhang RX, Wang LB, Lee DY, Ma ZZ, Zhang WY, Berman B. Effects of an acetone extract of          Boswellia carterii Birdw. (Burseraceae) gum resin on rats with persistent inflammation. J Altern Complement Med. 2005 Apr;11(2):323-31. PubMed PMID: 15865500.
  2. Fan AY, Lao L, Zhang RX, Zhou AN, Wang LB, Moudgil KD, Lee DY, Ma ZZ, Zhang WY, Berman BM. Effects of an acetone extract of Boswellia carterii Birdw. (Burseraceae) gum resin on adjuvant-induced arthritis in lewis rats. J Ethnopharmacol. 2005 Oct 3;101(1-3):104-9. PubMed PMID: 15970410
  3. Lao L, Fan AY, Zhang RX, Zhou A, Ma ZZ, Lee DY, Ren K, Berman B. Anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the modified Chinese herbal formula Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan (HLXL) in rats. Am J Chin Med. 2006;34(5):833-44. PubMed PMID: 17080548.
  4. Zhang RX, Fan AY, Zhou AN, Moudgil KD, Ma ZZ, Lee DY, Fong HH, Berman BM, Lao L. Extract of the Chinese herbal formula Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan inhibited adjuvant arthritis in rats. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Jan 30;121(3):366-71. PubMed PMID: 19100323; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2818782.

d. Efficacy studies on common used herbs and dietary supplements: Maitake mushroom, Qing Gan Jie Du Dan/ Liver purifier

  1. Echard BW, Talpur NA, Fan AY, Bagchi D, Preuss HG. Hepatoprotective ability of a novel botanical formulation on mild liver injury in rats produced by acute acetaminophen and/or alcohol ingestion. Res Commun Mol Pathol Pharmacol. 2001 Jul-Aug;110(1-2):73-85. PubMed PMID: 12090358.
  2. Talpur NA, Echard BW, Fan AY, Jaffari O, Bagchi D, Preuss HG. Antihypertensive and metabolic effects of whole Maitake mushroom powder and its fractions in two rat strains. Mol Cell Biochem. 2002 Aug;237(1-2):129-36. PubMed PMID: 12236580.
  3. Rajaiah R, Lee DY, Ma Z, Fan AY, Lao L, Fong HH, Berman BM, Moudgil KD. Huo-Luo-Xiao-Ling Dan modulates antigen-directed immune response in adjuvant-induced inflammation. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 May 4;123(1):40-4. PubMed PMID: 19429337; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2925191.

e. Safety and toxicity evaluation of herbal medicine: Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan; Literature review; acute toxicity investigation and chronic toxicity evaluation; comparing the single herb and compound formula.

  1. Zhang RX, Fan AY, Zhou AN, Moudgil KD, Ma ZZ, Lee DY, Fong HH, Berman BM, Lao L. Extract of the Chinese herbal formula Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan inhibited adjuvant arthritis in rats. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Jan 30;121(3):366-71. PubMed PMID: 19100323; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2818782.
  2. Fan AY, Lao L, Zhang RX, Zhou AN, Berman BM. Preclinical safety evaluation of the aqueous acetone extract of Chinese herbal formula Modified Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan. Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao. 2010 May;8(5):438-47. PubMed PMID: 20456842; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3739922.

D. Research Support

Completed Research Support

2003/07/31-2004/07/31

Under P50-00084, which was a Feasibility Study

Fan, Arthur Yin (PI)

A Pilot Study on Yang-Deficiency Syndrome And Pain Sensitivity in Rats

Yang-Deficiency (YD, also called Deficiency-cold Syndrome/Pattern, or Yang-Xu Zheng) is a common diagnosis made by traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and other chronic pain or/and chronic inflammatory diseases (CP/CID). YD is marked by chronic cold, frailty or weakness, lethargy, and decreased sexual and reproductive ability or poor body development. TCM Yang-enhancing remedies have demonstrably and effectively corrected these chronic conditions, and the application of such remedies could improve the rehabilitation process of some chronic diseases characterized by YD. In China, YD animal models have been successfully developed by injecting large doses of steroid hormones or by removing the adrenal gland or thyroid gland in rats, mice and rabbits. However, up to now, there has been no study on pain in the YD model or the RA-YD animal model. Our study will consist of two sets of experiments. In part one we will develop YD in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats by injecting them with hydrocortisone acetate daily for one week. We will test their major physiological parameters (body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure); administer endurance tests (anti-fatigue test: 25 ºC room temperature swimming test, anti-cold test under fatigue conditions: 0ºC ice-water swimming test); and measure the functions of three endocrinological axes (cortisone; triiodothyronine [T3], thyroxine [T4]; estradiol [E2], testosterone [T]) using radioimmunoassay (RIA) plasma levels. In part two, we will test the pain sensitivity using behavioral studies (paw withdrawal latency, or PWL) in YD rats compared to normal rats. The data obtained from this study will be used for a future pain and inflammation study, for an herbal remedy study on RA and its Syndromes, and for creating a RA-YD disease-Syndrome integrated animal model.

Role: PI

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Acupuncture helped the mother overcome the migraine and hypertension during pregnancy

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Mr. D. N.,80 years old,  had a stroke in last November (year 2011), the stroke affected  function of his celebellum and stem.  The main problem is dizziness and hearing loss. He had ten acupuncture treatments and’several months physical therapies, did not feel significant improvement.

On August 21,2012, patient started to see me. When he came, he was very dizzy, even the position change, such as  lying down and/or sitting up, causing severe dizziness. He had to use a cane to help the balance, his daughter or son helps his walk too.  For his hearing loss, he said he could answer the phone only when the speaker is on; he could not hear the door-bell ringing and the touch-tone sound of the phone.

After our 4 acupuncture treatments, his dizziness decreased at least 50% and walking much better, faster and balance better,don’t need other to help him; and hearing better.

After 6 treatments, he could hear the door-bell ringing and touch-tone sound of the phone. Very happy and said at least 50% improving. Currently, he is still under extensive acupuncture treatments in our office.

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Dr. Fan,
I hope you remember me, Simara. I used to go to your office for my bad back pain every weekend. I had an emergency at home with my father who got really ill and eventually passed away. I had to stay at home to take care for some things with my mother and the stay I had envisioned prolonged for a little bit. I just wanted to tell you thank you from the bottom of my heart beacuse you really made me feel better and whenever I couldn’t walk whenever I came into your office, an hour later I felt like it never happened. You really care for your patients and you are a really sweet man. I can honestly say you’re the best doctor I’ve ever had and I think you cured my back pain because thru all this time I haven’t been in Virginia, my back doesn’t bother me anymore. I will be back but I just wanted to let you know how grateful I am for basically curing me.
I also want to say that your assistant April, she is the sweetest, most attentive and professional person I’ve ever met. I miss you guys very much and hopefully I will be back very soon. I will go by the office to say hi.
Dr. Fan, thank you so much for being the man that you are and I hope you keep working healing people for a long, long, long time. Xie Xié.
Simara C.
Dr.Arthur Fan notes: acupuncture is one of most effective therapies in low back pain management, according to clinical trials and long term clinical practice.

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