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Posts Tagged ‘Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan’

OMB No. 0925-0001/0002 (Rev. 08/12 Approved Through 8/31/2015)

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

Provide the following information for the Senior/key personnel and other significant contributors.

Follow this format for each person. DO NOT EXCEED FIVE PAGES.

NAME: Fan, Arthur Yin
eRA COMMONS USER NAME (agency login):
POSITION TITLE: Independent researcher in Chinese Medicine, Licensed Acupuncturist

EDUCATION/TRAINING (Begin with baccalaureate or other initial professional education, such as nursing, include postdoctoral training and residency training if applicable.)

INSTITUTION AND LOCATION DEGREE
(if applicable)
Completion Date
MM/YYYY
FIELD OF STUDY
Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu MD 06/1986 Chinese Medicine
Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu PHD 06/1998 Chinese Internal Medicine, Brain diseases
Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing Municipal Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu Resident 07/1989 Integrative medicine
Nanjing University of Medical Science Brain Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu Other training 09/1990 Neurology
Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC Postdoctoral Fellow 08/2002 Pharmacology, toxicology in herbs, diet and nutrition supplements
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD Fellow 05/2005 Pain and inflammation; Acupuncture mechanism, herbal medicine efficacy and safety evaluation

A. Personal Statement

Arthur Yin Fan (Fan Ying) is an independent researcher and a leading specialist in Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine with about three decades of clinical experience in both Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Western medicine. He was awarded an MD degree in Chinese Medicine (1986) and a PhD in Chinese Internal Medicine (1998); he also had one additional year’s training in the neurology as well as a four-year residency combining Chinese and Western internal medicine, i.e. integrative medicine. He was the first NIH fellow in Chinese medicine in 2002-2005.

Dr. Fan has been a reviewer for medical research grants and academical papers for several peer-reviewed Journals for more than fifteen years; he has published over eighty academical papers. He was a consultant for the center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Maryland medical school. As a researcher in acupuncture, he investigated its effect and mechanism on reducing pain and inflammation. He also researched herbal medicine, nutrition supplements’ efficacy and safety at University of Maryland and Georgetown University Medical School.

Practicing in the Washington, DC-northern Virginia area since 2002, Dr. Fan employs acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine as alternative or complementary treatment for patients with various conditions. He is one of very few doctors who has both MD and PhD background (in Chinese medicine, integrative medicine). Dr. Fan holds the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM) certificate in Oriental Medicine.

From 1998 to 2001, Dr. Fan was one of the major designers and founders of Nanjing Chinese Medicine Center for Stroke, which combined the medical resources of ICU, neurology, acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, physical therapy, hyperbaric oxygen chamber, and other therapies to maximize patients’ survival and recovery in a limited time. Currently, this center is listed as one of the key stroke centers in China. This kind of integrative medicine style already has spread to every city of China since then.

  1. Talpur NA, Echard BW, Fan AY, Jaffari O, Bagchi D, Preuss HG. Antihypertensive and metabolic effects of whole Maitake mushroom powder and its fractions in two rat strains. Mol Cell Biochem. 2002 Aug;237(1-2):129-36. PubMed PMID: 12236580.
  2. Zhang RX, Lao L, Wang X, Fan A, Wang L, Ren K, Berman BM. Electroacupuncture attenuates inflammation in a rat model. J Altern Complement Med. 2005 Feb;11(1):135-42. PubMed PMID: 15750372.
  3. Fan AY, Lao L, Zhang RX, Zhou AN, Berman BM. Preclinical safety evaluation of the aqueous acetone extract of Chinese herbal formula Modified Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan. Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao. 2010 May;8(5):438-47. PubMed PMID: 20456842; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3739922.
  4. Fan AY. The methodology flaws in Hinman’s acupuncture clinical trial, part I: design and results interpretation. J Integr Med. 2015 Mar;13(2):65-8. PubMed PMID: 25797635.

B. Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

1986 – 1989 Resident doctor, Nanjing Municipal Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing
1990 – 1990 Fellow/trainee, Nanjing Brain Hospital, Nanjing University of Medical Science, Nanjing
1990 – 1995 Attending doctor, Neurology Department, Nanjing Municipal Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing
1998 – 2001 Associate Professor in Research and in Internal Medicine; Associate Chief doctor, Neurology Department, The Third Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing
2001 – 2002 Visiting researcher, postdoc, Dept. Physiology and Biophysics, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC
2002 – Independent researcher in Chinese Medicine, Licensed Acupuncturist, McLean Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, PLC, Vienna, VA
2002 – 2005 NIH Fellow in Chinese Medicine, Center for Integrative Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
2004 – 2005 Postdoc, Research assistant, Veteran Affairs Maryland Health Care , Baltimore, MD
2015 – Chair,Scientific Study & Academic Affair Committee, TCMAAA, Traditional Chinese Medicine American Alumni Association, Largo, FL

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

2008 – Member, Acupuncture Society of Virginia
2009 – 2010 Board member, Acupuncture Society of Virginia
2015 – Chair, Scientific Study & Academic Affair Committee, TCMAAA (Traditional Chinese Medicine American Alumni Association, FL, USA).

Honors

1995 Young Scientist Travel Award, International Brain Research Organization
2001 Merit award for Medical Science and Technology Advancement, Jiangsu Provincial Government, China
2011 Member, Editorial Committee, Journal of Integrative Medicine
2013 Editor, Journal of Alternative & Integrative Medicine

C. Contribution to Science

a. Acupuncture clinical trial methodology: design,sample size calculation, statistics, result interpretation
  1. Fan AY. The methodology flaws in Hinman’s acupuncture clinical trial, part I: design and results interpretation. J Integr Med. 2015 Mar;13(2):65-8. PubMed PMID: 25797635.
  2. Fan AY. The methodology flaws in Hinman’s acupuncture clinical trial, Part II: Zelen design and effectiveness dilutions. J Integr Med. 2015 May;13(3):136-9. PubMed PMID: 26006026.
b. Acupuncture mechanism study in pain and inflammation
  1. Zhang RX, Lao L, Wang X, Fan A, Wang L, Ren K, Berman BM. Electroacupuncture attenuates inflammation in a rat model. J Altern Complement Med. 2005 Feb;11(1):135-42. PubMed PMID: 15750372.
c. Herbology efficacy or herb-pharmacology: Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan; Comparing of the safety between single herb and formula
  1. Fan AY, Lao L, Zhang RX, Wang LB, Lee DY, Ma ZZ, Zhang WY, Berman B. Effects of an acetone extract of          Boswellia carterii Birdw. (Burseraceae) gum resin on rats with persistent inflammation. J Altern Complement Med. 2005 Apr;11(2):323-31. PubMed PMID: 15865500.
  2. Fan AY, Lao L, Zhang RX, Zhou AN, Wang LB, Moudgil KD, Lee DY, Ma ZZ, Zhang WY, Berman BM. Effects of an acetone extract of Boswellia carterii Birdw. (Burseraceae) gum resin on adjuvant-induced arthritis in lewis rats. J Ethnopharmacol. 2005 Oct 3;101(1-3):104-9. PubMed PMID: 15970410
  3. Lao L, Fan AY, Zhang RX, Zhou A, Ma ZZ, Lee DY, Ren K, Berman B. Anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the modified Chinese herbal formula Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan (HLXL) in rats. Am J Chin Med. 2006;34(5):833-44. PubMed PMID: 17080548.
  4. Zhang RX, Fan AY, Zhou AN, Moudgil KD, Ma ZZ, Lee DY, Fong HH, Berman BM, Lao L. Extract of the Chinese herbal formula Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan inhibited adjuvant arthritis in rats. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Jan 30;121(3):366-71. PubMed PMID: 19100323; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2818782.

d. Efficacy studies on common used herbs and dietary supplements: Maitake mushroom, Qing Gan Jie Du Dan/ Liver purifier

  1. Echard BW, Talpur NA, Fan AY, Bagchi D, Preuss HG. Hepatoprotective ability of a novel botanical formulation on mild liver injury in rats produced by acute acetaminophen and/or alcohol ingestion. Res Commun Mol Pathol Pharmacol. 2001 Jul-Aug;110(1-2):73-85. PubMed PMID: 12090358.
  2. Talpur NA, Echard BW, Fan AY, Jaffari O, Bagchi D, Preuss HG. Antihypertensive and metabolic effects of whole Maitake mushroom powder and its fractions in two rat strains. Mol Cell Biochem. 2002 Aug;237(1-2):129-36. PubMed PMID: 12236580.
  3. Rajaiah R, Lee DY, Ma Z, Fan AY, Lao L, Fong HH, Berman BM, Moudgil KD. Huo-Luo-Xiao-Ling Dan modulates antigen-directed immune response in adjuvant-induced inflammation. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 May 4;123(1):40-4. PubMed PMID: 19429337; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2925191.

e. Safety and toxicity evaluation of herbal medicine: Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan; Literature review; acute toxicity investigation and chronic toxicity evaluation; comparing the single herb and compound formula.

  1. Zhang RX, Fan AY, Zhou AN, Moudgil KD, Ma ZZ, Lee DY, Fong HH, Berman BM, Lao L. Extract of the Chinese herbal formula Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan inhibited adjuvant arthritis in rats. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Jan 30;121(3):366-71. PubMed PMID: 19100323; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2818782.
  2. Fan AY, Lao L, Zhang RX, Zhou AN, Berman BM. Preclinical safety evaluation of the aqueous acetone extract of Chinese herbal formula Modified Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan. Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao. 2010 May;8(5):438-47. PubMed PMID: 20456842; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3739922.

D. Research Support

Completed Research Support

2003/07/31-2004/07/31

Under P50-00084, which was a Feasibility Study

Fan, Arthur Yin (PI)

A Pilot Study on Yang-Deficiency Syndrome And Pain Sensitivity in Rats

Yang-Deficiency (YD, also called Deficiency-cold Syndrome/Pattern, or Yang-Xu Zheng) is a common diagnosis made by traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and other chronic pain or/and chronic inflammatory diseases (CP/CID). YD is marked by chronic cold, frailty or weakness, lethargy, and decreased sexual and reproductive ability or poor body development. TCM Yang-enhancing remedies have demonstrably and effectively corrected these chronic conditions, and the application of such remedies could improve the rehabilitation process of some chronic diseases characterized by YD. In China, YD animal models have been successfully developed by injecting large doses of steroid hormones or by removing the adrenal gland or thyroid gland in rats, mice and rabbits. However, up to now, there has been no study on pain in the YD model or the RA-YD animal model. Our study will consist of two sets of experiments. In part one we will develop YD in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats by injecting them with hydrocortisone acetate daily for one week. We will test their major physiological parameters (body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure); administer endurance tests (anti-fatigue test: 25 ºC room temperature swimming test, anti-cold test under fatigue conditions: 0ºC ice-water swimming test); and measure the functions of three endocrinological axes (cortisone; triiodothyronine [T3], thyroxine [T4]; estradiol [E2], testosterone [T]) using radioimmunoassay (RIA) plasma levels. In part two, we will test the pain sensitivity using behavioral studies (paw withdrawal latency, or PWL) in YD rats compared to normal rats. The data obtained from this study will be used for a future pain and inflammation study, for an herbal remedy study on RA and its Syndromes, and for creating a RA-YD disease-Syndrome integrated animal model.

Role: PI

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There are six papers in http://www.PubMed.gov, a NIH database for Modified Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan, Dr.Arthur Yin Fan involved in most of these studies, included in pre-clinical studies for safety evaluation and efficacy tests, mechanism explorations. This project was a NIH funded studies conducted in University of Maryland Harvard University.

Lao L, Fan AY, Zhang RX, Zhou A, Ma ZZ, Lee DY, Ren K, Berman B.

Am J Chin Med. 2006;34(5):833-44.

PMID:17080548 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]Related citations

Zhang RX, Fan AY, Zhou AN, Moudgil KD, Ma ZZ, Lee DY, Fong HH, Berman BM, Lao L.

J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Jan 30;121(3):366-71. Epub 2008 Nov 28.

PMID: 19100323 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE] Free PMC ArticleRelated citations

Rajaiah R, Lee DY, Ma Z, Fan AY, Lao L, Fong HH, Berman BM, Moudgil KD.

J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 May 4;123(1):40-4. Epub 2009 Mar 4.

PMID: 19429337 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE] Free PMC ArticleRelated citations

Fan AY, Lao L, Zhang RX, Zhou AN, Berman BM.

Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao. 2010 May;8(5):438-47.

PMID: 20456842 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE] Free ArticleRelated citations

Yang YH, Rajaiah R, Lee DY, Ma Z, Yu H, Fong HH, Lao L, Berman BM, Moudgil KD.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2011;2011:642027. Epub 2010 Oct 19.

PMID: 20981317 [PubMed] Free PMC ArticleRelated citations

Nanjundaiah SM, Lee DY, Ma Z, Fong HH, Lao L, Berman BM, Moudgil KD.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012;2012:589256. Epub 2012 Mar 7.

PMID: 22474510 [PubMed] Free PMC ArticleRelated citations

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Fan AY, Lao L, Zhang RX, Zhou AN, Berman BM. Preclinical safety evaluation of the aqueous acetone extract of Chinese herbal formula Modified Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan. Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao. 2010 May;8(5):438-47.

Objective: To investigate the safety of oral administration of Modified Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan (HLXLD), a compound traditional Chinese herbal medicine. Methods: The toxicological information of HLXLD and its individual constituent herbs was searched in cintcm or TCMlars (www.cintcm.com), PubMed (MEDLINE), Chinese Herbal Medicine (1999) and WHO Monographs on Selected Medicinal Plants (Vol. I- III). Single-dose acute toxicity was assessed by using the highest possible dosage. Motor function test was used to determine whether the herbal formula might cause motor impairment. Nine-day HLXLD repeat-dose sub-chronic toxicity/adverse effects, and 42-day chronic toxicity/adverse effects in rats were also assessed. Results: The literature searches showed that HLXLD and its eleven ingredient herbs had no side/adverse effects listed in the traditional Chinese medicine literature. Under the dosages proposed in the formula, the HLXLD formula had no side/adverse effects according to MEDLINE, Chinese Herbal Medicine and WHO Monographs on Selected Medicinal Plants. The studies in rats showed: (1) in single-dose acute toxicity assessment, the maximal feasible single oral dose, 9.20 g/kg HLXLD, showed no significant effect on clinical signs, or body weight and mortality over a 14-day period in rats; (2) during motor function test, nine-day repeat-dose of daily HLXLD treatment at 4.60 g/kg did not cause motor impairment; (3) in nine-day HLXLD repeat-dose sub-chronic toxicity/adverse effects assessment, there were no noticeable abnormal behavioral changes or obvious adverse reactions and signs in complete Freund’s adjuvant inflamed rats (highest observed dosage: 4.60 g/kg), and no noticeable adverse effects were observed during, or 14 days after nine-day treatment at 4.60 g/kg in non-inflamed rats; (4) during 42-day chronic toxicity/adverse effects assessments, no noticeable abnormal behavioral changes, no obvious adverse reactions and signs were observed in normal rats administered with HLXLD at a dose of 2.30 g/kg and the values of serum biochemistry and histopathology were in normal range. Conclusion: Both existing information and animal data support that Modified HLXLD is a safe herbal product for clinical application.

PMID: 20456842 [PubMed – in process]

Free Full Text at http://www.jcimjournal.com/articles/publishArticles/pdf/201051481790.pdf

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