Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘headache’

In recent years, I have had several patients with eye issues whom I have treated with acupuncture. Some cases resulted in some very impressive results.

One of my patients has glaucoma, in which pressure in both eyes was high. He was monitored under his eye doctor. After three months of acupuncture treatment, the patient’s pressure in back eyes was back to normal (15) from one side 19 and another side 21.

In another glaucoma patient, she had strong headache due to increasing left eye pressure. After acupuncture one time, her headache disappeared and the eye pressure went back to normal.

We have also treated two kids with Strabismus (Crossed Eyes),twice a week for three weeks; their sight is almost normal and the eye doctors said that there is no longer a need for them to wear special glasses to undergo eye surgery at this time.

From both my personal experience and that of others, I would conclude that acupuncture is indeed an effective and non-invasive treatment for a variety of eye ailments, including strabismus and glaucoma.

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

« How large are the nonspecific effects of acupuncture? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

via Acupuncture for Chronic Pain is effective -Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis says.

Read Full Post »

http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1357513

Acupuncture for Chronic Pain Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis

Andrew J. Vickers, DPhil; Angel M. Cronin, MS; Alexandra C. Maschino, BS; George Lewith, MD; Hugh MacPherson, PhD; Nadine E. Foster, DPhil; Karen J. Sherman, PhD; Claudia M. Witt, MD; Klaus Linde, MD ; for the Acupuncture Trialists’ Collaboration
Arch Intern Med. 2012;172(19):1444-1453. doi:10.1001/archinternmed.2012.3654.

Background

Although acupuncture is widely used for chronic pain, there remains considerable controversy as to its value. We aimed to determine the effect size of acupuncture for four chronic pain conditions: back and neck pain, osteoarthritis, chronic headache, and shoulder pain.

Methods

We conducted a systematic review to identify randomized trials of acupuncture for chronic pain where allocation concealment was determined unambiguously to be adequate. Individual patient data meta-analyses were conducted using data from 29 of 31 eligible trials, with a total of 17,922 patients analyzed.

Results

In the primary analysis including all eligible trials, acupuncture was superior to both sham and no acupuncture control for each pain condition (all p<0.001). After exclusion of an outlying set of trials that strongly favored acupuncture, the effect sizes were similar across pain conditions. Patients receiving acupuncture had less pain, with scores 0.23 (95% C.I. 0.13, 0.33), 0.16 (95% C.I. 0.07, 0.25) and 0.15 (95% C.I. 0.07, 0.24) standard deviations lower than sham controls for back and neck pain, osteoarthritis, and chronic headache respectively; the effect sizes in comparison to no acupuncture controls were 0.55 (95% C.I. 0.51, 0.58), 0.57 (95% C.I. 0.50, 0.64) and 0.42 (95% C.I. 0.37, 0.46). These results were robust to a variety of sensitivity analyses, including those related to publication bias.

Conclusions

Acupuncture is effective for the treatment of chronic pain and is therefore a reasonable referral option. Significant differences between true and sham acupuncture indicate that acupuncture is more than a placebo. However, these differences are relatively modest, suggesting that factors in addition to the specific effects of needling are important contributors to the therapeutic effects of acupuncture.

Read Full Post »

September 6, 2012

Doctor Fan,

I want to thank you for using your expert acupuncture techniques to solve my long lasting Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS).

Traditional medicine did not work and your remedies have allowed me to sleep well at night.

Thank you very much.

Sincerely,

P. A.

Dr.Arthur fan notes: after acupuncture, patient feels no longer have restless leg syndrome, and migraine gone, sleep very soundly.

And, very important the mood much calm.

Read Full Post »

[NBC News]

Study: Placebo or Not, Acupuncture Helps with Pain

Researchers concluded that the needle remedy worked better than usual pain treatment and better than fake acupuncture.

Acupuncture gets a thumbs-up for helping relieve pain from chronic headaches, backaches and arthritis in a review of more than two dozen studies — the latest analysis of an often-studied therapy that has as many fans as critics.

Some believe its only powers are a psychological, placebo effect. But some doctors believe even if that’s the explanation for acupuncture’s effectiveness, there’s no reason not to offer it if it makes people feel better.

The new analysis examined 29 studies involving almost 18,000 adults. The researchers concluded that the needle remedy worked better than usual pain treatment and slightly better than fake acupuncture. That kind of analysis is not the strongest type of research, but the authors took extra steps including examining raw data from the original studies.

READ Detail at: http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/health/NATL-Study-Placebo-or-Not-Acupuncture-Helps-with-Pain–169425116.html

Read Full Post »

Acupuncture for Treatment of Migraines
Source: Acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2009, Issue 1

The reviews appear in the current issue of The Cochrane Library, a publication of The Cochrane Collaboration, an international organization that evaluates research in all aspects of health care. Systematic reviews draw evidence-based conclusions about medical practice after considering both the content and quality of existing trials on a topic.Acupuncture involves penetrating the skin with thin, metallic needles at specific points. It is one of the main medical treatments in traditional Chinese medicine, where it came into being more than 2,000 years ago. Lead reviewer Klaus Linde of the Center for Complementary Medicine Research at the Technical University of Munich said the therapy is popular in his country. “In Germany, acupuncture is frequently used for headache,” he said. “Most private health insurances, in fact, reimburse for acupuncture, although they cover only about 10 percent of the population.”

The practice has also gained popularity in the United States. A 2002 National Health Interview Survey of complementary and alternative medicine use found that about 8.2 million U.S. adults had ever used acupuncture in their lives, and an estimated 2.1 million had used acupuncture the previous year. Brian Berman, M.D., director of the University of Maryland Center for Integrative Medicine in Baltimore, confirmed that acupuncture is definitely becoming a more popular treatment option for Americans. “There is more evidence coming out showing acupuncture is safe and often effective and should be considered as part of a multidisciplinary approach for chronic pain,” he said.

The first Cochrane review by Linde and his colleagues focused on acupuncture for tension headaches. The researchers evaluated 11 studies that investigated 2,317 participants. The studies compared participants who had undergone acupuncture therapy with those who had no treatment except painkillers for acute headaches, or had a sham therapy, which mimicked “true” acupuncture. Researchers followed the patients for at least eight weeks. Two large studies that investigated whether adding acupuncture to treatment with painkillers found that those patients who received acupuncture had fewer headaches. Forty-seven percent of patients who received acupuncture reported a decrease in the number of headache days by at least half, compared with 16 percent of patients in the control groups.

Six studies compared true acupuncture to “fake’ acupuncture in which needles were either inserted at incorrect points or did not penetrate the skin. Overall, these studies found slightly better effects in the patients receiving the true acupuncture intervention. “The response to acupuncture in general seems to be large and clinically relevant,” Linde said. Berman agreed with the review findings and said patients at his clinic seek acupuncture for the relief from tension headaches and some experience good outcomes. “I have seen some patients do very well, but not everyone,” he said. “Often, the intensity of the headaches and number of headaches are reduced.”

In a second review, Linde and colleagues examined acupuncture for migraine treatment and reviewed 22 trials with 4,419 total participants who had received a migraine pain diagnosis with or without aura. Six studies compared acupuncture to no treatment or routine care (with painkillers) only. After three to four months, patients who received acupuncture had fewer headaches. “The effect over no prophylactic [preventive] treatment and also compared to prophylactic drug treatment proven to be superior to placebo is clearly clinically important,” said Linde.

The Cochrane reviewers concluded that there is consistent evidence that acupuncture provides additional benefit to treatment of acute migraine attacks only or to routine care. They also concluded that for migraine patients, placing the needles in the correct points did not seem as relevant, which is contrary to what most acupuncturists believe. “On average, the studies do not show an effect of acupuncture at correct points over acupuncture at incorrect points,” Linde said. There appeared to be some benefit of pain relief regardless of the insertion points.

The reviews disclose that Linde has received travel reimbursement and twice received fees from acupuncture societies for speaking about research at conferences. Other review authors reported a variety of honoraria and reimbursements related to acupuncture lectures and speaking engagements.

The Cochrane Collaboration is an international nonprofit, independent organization that produces and disseminates systematic reviews of health care interventions and promotes the search for evidence in the form of clinical trials and other studies of interventions. Visit http://www.cochrane.org for more information.Linde K, et al. Acupuncture for tension-type headaches. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2009, Issue 1.

Read Full Post »

A letter from migraine patient Virginia M R.

October 30, 2008

Dear Dr. Fan,

It has been a pleasure receiving acupuncture treatments (8 sessions) from you!

I sought your help as I have had migraine headaches for years. I have taken so many medications which probably are not good for my body and they are very expensive. I want to thank you for the relief you have given me with your acupuncture treatments, herbal teas and herbal pills.

I appreciate learning from you the Chinese methodology in acupuncture treatment. It all make sense. In my opinion, the treatments were painless, without side-effects and much economical than the Western medicine approach that I employed for years.

A friend of mine who is an acupuncturist in California has been encouraging me to get this type of treatment. Another friend told me she, too, has a friend who has been a practitioner for 20+ years and he has tremendous success primarily for cessation of back pain and infertility issues.

Arthur, you are an excellent educator! I plan to continue treatment for periodic “tune-ups”, as my California friend calls them. I appreciate your professionalism, your pleasant staff and your earnest interest in helping me (your patients) feel better and to function more happily.

Sincerely,

 

Virginia M R.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »