Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Chinese’

Dr. Miriam Lee: a heroine for the start of acupuncture as a profession in the State of California

Click to access S2095-4964(14)60016-9.pdf

The History of Acupuncture in the U.S. Begins with Miriam Lee

From http://www.insights-for-acupuncturists.com/history-of-acupuncture.html

(Re-posted by Dr.Arthur Yin Fan. We got kind permission from original author Lisa Hanfileti, LAc.)

Miriam Lee with Susan Johnson

I have no business writing about the history of acupuncture in America. I am not a historian. I am definitely not an impartial observer.

I am a licensed acupuncturist who is passionate about the profession and I have an agenda to help new acupuncturists build solid, sustainable practices. Moreover, I think Miriam Lee is the George Washington of American acupuncture.

Dr. Miriam Lee (left) with Susan Johnson (right) Reprinted with kind permission from Susan Johnson Read more about Miriam Lee at www.tungspoints.net

Currency should be minted with her face on it. Streets should be named after her.

There should be a medal of Honor called the “Miriam Lee Award”, bestowed upon those who display dedication and excellence in the field of acupuncture. And she should be the first to receive it. This is hardly the frame of mind of a reporter of historical facts. But maybe it is time a passionate and biased acupuncturist offered a different version of the history of Acupuncture in America.

The History of Acupuncture in America Does Not Begin With Nixon

Perhaps you have already heard the popular version that acupuncture arrived when Nixon opened up relations with China. There is no doubt that this helped acupuncture to grow, but it does not mark the beginning of acupuncture in the United States. A true historian would start the “History of Acupuncture in America” by documenting the Chinese doctor who first made acupuncture available. I am not sure that information is even known. (Master’s Thesis, anyone?) One thing we do know is that Chinese medicine arrived in the U.S. through the doctors who immigrated here, some as early as the 1800’s. See, China Doctor of John Day (1979) by Jeffrey Barlow and Christine Richardson. However, for most modern Americans they will “start” the history of acupuncture in 1972 when then President Nixon’s Secretary of State, Henry A. Kissinger, traveled to China accompanied by a journalist for the New York Times. While in China the journalist, named James Reston, fell ill and ended up in a Chinese hospital requiring an emergency appendectomy.To relieve his pain doctors used acupuncture. Intrigued and impressed with the effectiveness of his experience with acupuncture, James Reston wrote about his hospitalization and acupuncture treatment in the New York Times, exposing countless Americans for the first time to acupuncture. What James Reston didn’t know is that in 1966 a young Chinese doctor immigrated to the United States and quietly started a revolution that would lead to the legalization of acupuncture in California, and set a precedent for the rest of the United States.

A New Version of the History of Acupuncture in the United States

As American acupuncturists, with a relatively short history, it is important to know how acupuncture developed in this country and on whose broad shoulders we stand. History texts from China tell us that the ancient way of learning Chinese medicine was to apprentice with a Master.

Chinese Commemorative WallStudents spent years learning about the art and application of acupuncture and herbal medicine. But they also learned something else. They learned the lineage of their medicine. These apprentices learned the names of all the Masters who came before them, all the way back to Qi Boand the Yellow Emperor. This was not some silly exercise in memorization. It was a respectful study honoring the contributions of thought, theory, practice, technique, and understanding of the doctors who devoted their lives to the art of healing and the science of medicine.

The Heroes of America Acupuncture

Unlike the apprentices of ancient China I cannot give you an historically accurate list of Acupuncture Masters who took on the daunting task of establishing Chinese medicine in the United States. So instead I will provide you with The Heroes of American Acupuncture as I see it.

Who’s Your Acupuncture Hero?? Click Here to Share Who Inspired YOU!


Miriam Lee

Miriam Lee is my Hero. In her book, Insights of a Senior Acupuncturist, Dr. Lee shares her journey to the United States and how she came to practice acupuncture at a time when it was illegal. Dr. Lee was a trained nurse, midwife, and acupuncturist in China during a time of poverty and war. She escaped to Singapore in 1949 and it was there that she began her study of emotionally-based illnesses. In pursuit of a better life, she moved to the United States in 1966. She arrived in California at a time when acupuncture was illegal, so she took a job in a factory, unsure if she would ever practice medicine again. It was only when she saw a friend’s bed-ridden son that she offered her skills knowing that acupuncture could help. After several treatments he completely recovered. This began a deluge of word-of-mouth referrals. She always found a way to see the 75 to 80 patients a day who lined up at her door. Miriam Lee rose to the challenge. Her attitude was, “If you don’t press the olive seed, there will be no oil.” (From her book, Insights of a Senior Acupuncturist) As if she was not under enough pressure, she was arrested in 1975 for “practicing medicine without a license”. Her patients filled the courtrooms anxious to testify on her behalf. Finally a compromise was proposed and Dr. Lee was permitted to practice acupuncture as an “experimental procedure”. A year later acupuncture was signed into California law as a legal medical practice. Miriam Lee went on to found and run the Acupuncture Association of America working closely with law makers to develop a comprehensive scope of practice and professional licensing for acupuncturists. Dr. Lee’s persistence lead to the inclusion of acupuncture coverage by California’s primary health care insurance plans. All the while Miriam Lee maintained her clinical practice and was devoted to teaching acupuncture to students. She is responsible for bringing many well known practitioners from China to teach seminars at her Palo Alto clinic. Those seminars and Dr. Lee’s courses on Tung’s Points, Herbal Formulations, Scalp Acupuncture, Wrist and Ankle Points, and TCM Gynecology and Oncology are still being taught and utilized today. Miriam Lee has poured her heart and soul into the welfare of her patients, the teaching of her students, and the entire profession of acupuncture in the United States. As I stated earlier she should be the first recipient of the Miriam Lee AwardConsider this her nomination.


Bob Flaws

Bob Flaws is another Hero. He has dedicated himself to translating and publishing otherwise inaccessible Chinese textbooks and making them available in the United States. He has also contributed innumerable essays, thought-provoking articles, and books on Chinese Medicine. He and his wife Honora Lee Wolfe started Blue Poppy Press and are the reason why we know who Miriam Lee is in the first place. The Blue Poppy organization is dedicated to the advancement of acupuncture and provides supportive materials, including classes, and workshops for acupuncture marketing and business management.


Ted Kaptchuck

Ted Kaptchuck is the author of The Web That Has No Weaver, an incredible book on Chinese medicine written at a time when there was little understanding of such concepts of QiYin, and Yang. I still regard his definition of Qi as the most comprehensive; “Qi is energy on the verge of becoming matter, and matter on the verge of becoming energy.” Today his book continues to be used as a standard textbook in many acupuncture schools and is a reliable resource for studying for the NCCAOM certification exam. Ted is a researcher at Harvard University and has written numerous insightful articles and books on Chinese medicine and acupuncture. He started Kan Herbal Company and provides traditional and original herbal formulations to practitioners around the world. Read Ted Kaptchuk’s interview on Scientific American Frontiers. He has a unique understanding of the similarities and differences between Western Medicine and Eastern Medicine, and he shares his valuable perspective on the history of Eastern Medicine in the United States.


Ing Hay

“Doc Hay” predates any acupuncturists already mentioned and may be the first documented Chinese herbalist in the United States. Ing Hay and his outgoing partner, Lung On deserve recognition for their amazing accomplishments. In 1887 a 25 year old Ing Hay arrived in Eastern Oregon in the then mining town of John Day. He was among a small group of Chinese immigrants there to mine and make their fortune. However fate took a turn. Ing Hay met a bright young man named Lung On. Together they drew on the traditional medicine of their homeland to provide much needed medicine to the small community. Their commitment to healing and the townspeople are recorded in China Doctor of John Day (1979) by Jeffrey Barlow and Christine Richardson. The Kam Wah Chung Building where Doc Hay lived and saw his patients is preserved as an historic site in John Day, Oregon. A guided tour reveals actual packages of herbs from China that Doc Hay used in his formulations. Some of these herbs are so rare they have yet to be identified.


This list of people who wrote the history of acupuncture in America is far from complete. There are so many more and they ALL deserve recognition and thanks. Watch for this list to grow as more information is gathered. Please share your Insights about any of these or other acupuncturists who inspired you.

Who Is Your Acupuncture Hero? Who Inspired You.
Modern Acupuncturists Helping Acupuncturists

Read Full Post »

From: National Institute of Health, National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)

NCCAM Clearinghouse

Acupuncture is one of the oldest, most commonly used medical procedures in the world. Originating in China moe than 2,000 years ago, acupuncture became widely known in the United States in 1971 when New York Times reporter James Reston wrote about how doctors in Beijing, China, used needles to ease his abdominal pain after surgery. Research shows that acupuncture is beneficial in treating a variety of health conditions.

In the past two decades, acupuncture has grown in popularity in the United States. In 1993, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) estimated that Americans made 9 to 12 million visits per year to acupuncture practitioners and spent as much as $500 million on acupuncture treatments.1 In 1995, an estimated 10,000 nationally certified acupuncturists were practicing in the United States. By the year 2000, that number is expected to double. Currently, an estimated one-third of certified acupuncturists in the United States are medical doctors.2

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has funded a variety of research projects on acupuncture that have been awarded by its National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institute of Dental Research, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and National Institute on Drug Abuse.

This information and resource package provides general information about acupuncture, summaries of NIH research findings on acupuncture, information for the health consumer, a list of additional information resources, and a glossary that defines terms italicized in the text. It also lists books, journals, organizations, and Internet resources to help you learn more about acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine.

Acupuncture Theories

Traditional Chinese medicine theorizes that the more than 2,000 acupuncture points on the human body connect with 12 main and 8 secondary pathways, called meridians. Chinese medicine practitioners believe these meridians conduct energy, or qi, between the surface of the body and internal organs.

Qi regulates spiritual, emotional, mental, and physical balance. Qi is influenced by the opposing forces of yin and yang. According to traditional Chinese medicine when yin and yang are balanced they work together with the natural flow of qi to help the body achieve and maintain health. Acupuncture is believed to balance yin and yang, keep the normal flow of energy unblocked, and restore health to the body and mind.

Traditional Chinese medicine practices (including acupuncture, herbs, diet, massage, and meditative physical exercises) all are intended to improve the flow of qi.3

Western scientists have found meridians hard to identify because meridians do not directly correspond to nerve or blood circulation pathways. Some researchers believe that meridians are located throughout the body’s connective tissue;4 others do not believe that qi exists at all.5,6Such differences of opinion have made acupuncture a source of scientific controversy.

Preclinical Studies

Preclinical studies have documented acupuncture’s effects, but they have not been able to fully explain how acupuncture works within the framework of the Western system of medicine.7,8,9,10,11,12

Mechanisms of Action

Several processes have been proposed to explain acupuncture’s effects, primarily those on pain. Acupuncture points are believed to stimulate the central nervous system (the brain and spinal cord) to release chemicals into the muscles, spinal cord, and brain. These chemicals either change the experience of pain or release other chemicals, such as hormones, that influence the body’s self-regulating systems. The biochemical changes may stimulate the body’s natural healing abilities and promote physical and emotional well-being.13 There are three main mechanisms:

  • Conduction of electromagnetic signals: Western scientists have found evidence that acupuncture points an strategic conductors of electromagnetic signals. Stimulating points along these pathways through acupuncture enables electromagnetic signals to be relayed at it greater rate than under normal conditions. These signals may start the flow of pain-killing biochemicals such as endorphins and of immune system cells to specific sites that are injured or vulnerable to disease.14,15
  • Activation of opioid systems: research has found that several types of opioids may be released into the central nervous system during acupuncture treatment, thereby reducing pain.16
  • Changes in brain chemistry sensation, and Involuntary body functions: studies have shown that acupuncture may alter brain chemistry by changing the release ofneurotransmitters and neurohormones in a good way. Acupuncture also has been documented to affect the parts of the central nervous system related to sensation and involuntary body functions, such as immune reactions and processes whereby a person’s blood pressure, blood flow, and body temperature are regulated.3,17,18
Conditions Appropriate for Acupuncture Therapy
Digestive
Abdominal pain
Constipation
Diarrhea
Hyperacidity
Indigestion
Emotional
Anxiety
Depression
Insomnia
Nervousness
Neurosis
Eye-Ear-Nose-Throat
Cataracts
Gingivitis
Poor vision
Tinnitis
Toothache
Gynecological
Infertility
Menopausal symptoms
Premenstrual syndrome
Miscellaneous
Addiction control
Athletic performance
Blood pressure regulation
Chronic fatigue
Immune system tonification
Stress reduction
Musculoskeletal
Arthritis
Back pain
Muscle cramping
Muscle pain/weakness
Neck pain
Sciatica
Neurological
Headaches
Migraines
Neurogenic
Bladder dysfunction
Parkinson’s disease
Postoperative pain
Stroke
Respiratory
Asthma
Bronchitis
Common cold
Sinusitis
Smoking cessation
Tonsilitis
Source: World Health Organization United Nations. “Viewpoint on Acupuncture.” 19 19 (revised).23

Clinical Studies

According to an NIH consensus panel of scientists, researchers, and practitioners who convened in November 1997, clinical studies have shown that acupuncture is an effective treatment for nausea caused by surgical anesthesia and cancer as well as for dental pain experienced after surgery. The panel also found that acupuncture is useful by itself or combined with conventional therapies to treat addiction, headaches, menstrual cramps, tennis elbow,fibromyalgia, myofascial pain, osteoarthritis, lower back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and asthma; and to assist in stroke rehabilitation.19

Increasingly, acupuncture is complementing conventional therapies. For example, doctors may combine acupuncture and drugs to control surgery related pain in their patients.20 By providing both acupuncture and certain conventional anesthetic drugs, doctors have found it possible to achieve a state of complete pain relief for some patients.16 They also have found that using acupuncture lowers the need for conventional pain-killing drugs and thus reduces the risk of side effects for patients who take the drugs.21,22

Outside the United States, the World Health Organization (WHO), the health branch of the United Nations, lists more than 40 conditions for which acupuncture may be used.23 The table (above) lists these conditions.

Currently, one of the main reasons Americans seek acupuncture treatment is to relieve chronic pain, especially from conditions such as arthritis or lower back disorders.24,25 Some clinical studies show that acupuncture is effective in relieving both chronic (long-lasting) and acute or sudden pain,26 but other research indicates that it provides no relief from chronic pain.27Additional research is needed to provide definitive answers.

FDA’s Role

The FDA approved acupuncture needles for use by licensed practitioners in 1996. The FDA requires manufacturers of acupuncture needles to label them for single use only.28 Relatively few complications from the use of acupuncture have been reported to the FDA when one considers the millions of people treated each year and the number of acupuncture needles used. Still, complications have resulted from inadequate sterilization of needles and from improper delivery of treatments. When not delivered properly acupuncture can cause serious adverse effects, including infections and puncturing of organs.1

NCCAM-Sponsored Clinical Research

Originally founded in 1992 as the Office of Alternative Medicine (OAM), the NCCAM facilitates the research and evaluation of unconventional medical practices and disseminates this information to the public. The NCCAM established in 1998, supports 13 Centers, where researchers conduct studies on complementary and alternative medicine for specific health conditions and diseases. Scientists at several Centers are investigating acupuncture therapy.

Researchers at the NCCAM Center at the University of Maryland in Baltimore conducted arandomized controlled clinical trial and found that patients treated with acupuncture after dental surgery had less intense pain than patients who received a placebo.20 Other scientists at the Center found that older people with osteoarthritis experienced significantly more pain relief after using conventional drugs and acupuncture together than those using conventional therapy alone.29

Researchers at the Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation in Minnesota are studying the use of acupuncture to treat alcoholism and addiction to benzodiazepines, nicotine, and cocaine. Scientists at the Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation in New Jersey are studying acupuncture to treat a strokerelated swallowing disorder and the pain associated with spinal cord injuries.

The OAM, now the NCCAM, also funded several individual researchers in 1993 and 1994 to conduct preliminary studies on acupuncture. In one small randomized controlled clinical trial, more than half of the I I women with a major depressive episode who were treated with acupuncture improved significantly.30

In another controlled clinical trial, nearly half of the seven children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder who underwent acupuncture treatment showed some improvement in their symptoms. Researchers concluded that acupuncture was a useful alternative to standard medication for some children with this condition.31

In a third small controlled study, eight pregnant women were given moxibustion to reduce the rate of breech births, in which tile fetus is positioned for birth feet-first instead of the normal position of head-first. Researchers found the treatment to be safe, but they were uncertain whether it was effective.32 Then, rescarchers reporting in the November 11, 1998, issue of theJournal of the American Medical Association conducted a larger randomized controlled clinical trial using moxibustion. They found that moxibustion applied to 130 pregnant women presenting breech significantly increased the number of normal head-first births.33

Acupuncture and You

The use of acupuncture, like many other complementary and alternative treatments, has produced a good deal of anecdotal evidence. Much of this evidence comes from people who report their own successful use of the treatment. If a treatment appears to be safe and patients report recovery from their illness or condition after using it, others may decide to use the treatment. However, scientific research may not substantiate the anecdotal reports.

Lifestyle, age, physiology, and other factors combine to make every person different. A treatment that works for one person in, y not work for another who has the very same condition. You, as a health care consumer (especially if you have a preexisting medical condition), should discuss acupuncture with your doctor. Do not rely on a diagnosis of disease by an acupuncturist who does not have substantial conventional medical training. If you have received a diagnosis from a doctor and have had little or no success using conventional medicine, you may wish to ask your doctor whether acupuncture might help.

Finding a Licensed Acupuncture Practitioner

Doctors are a good resource for referrals to acupuncturists. Increasingly, doctors are familiar with acupuncture and may know of a certified practitioner. In addition, more medical doctors, including neurologists, anesthesiologists, and specialists in physical medicine, are becoming trained in acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, and other alternative and complementary therapies. Friends and family members may be a source of referrals as well. In addition, national referral organizations provide the names of practitioners, although these organizations may be advocacy groups for the practitioners to whom they refer. See “Acupuncture Information Resources” for a list of these organizations.

Check a practitioner’s credentials.

A practitioner who is licensed and credentialed may provide better care than one who is not. About 30 states have established training standards for certification to practice acupuncture, but not all states require acupuncturists to obtain a license to practice. Although proper credentials do not ensure competency, they do indicate that the practitioner has met certain standards to treat patients with acupuncture.

The American Academy of Medical Acupuncture can give you a referral list of doctors who practice acupuncture. The National Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Alliance lists thousands of acupuncturists on its Web site and provides the list to callers to their information and referral line. The Alliance requires documentation of state license or national board certification from its listed acupuncturists. The American Association of Oriental Medicine can tell you the state licensing status of acupuncture practitioners across the United States as well. To contact these and other organizations, see “Acupuncture Information Resources.”

Check treatment cost and insurance coverage.

Reflecting public demand, an estimated 70 to 80 percent of the nation’s insurers covered some acupuncture treatments in 1996. An acupuncturist may provide information about the number of treatments needed and how much each will cost. Generally, treatment may take place over a few days or several weeks. The cost per treatment typically ranges between $30 and $100 but it may be more. Physician acupuncturists may charge more than nonphysician practitioners.13

Check treatment procedures.

Find out about the treatment procedures that will be used and their likelihood of success. You also should make certain that the practitioner uses 1 new set of disposable needles in a sealed package every time. The FDA requires the use of sterile, nontoxic needles that bear a labeling statement restricting their use to qualified practitioners. The practitioner also should swat, the puncture site with alcohol or another before inserting the needle.

Some practitioners may use electroacupuncture; others may use moxibustion. These approaches are part of traditional Chinese medicine, and Western researchers are beginning to study whether they enhance acupuncture’s effects.

During your first office visit, the practitioner may ask you at length about your health condition, lifestyle, and behavior The practitioner will want to obtain a complete picture of your treatment needs and behaviors that may contribute to the condition. This holistic approach is typical of traditional Chinese medicine and many other alternative and complementary therapies. Let the acupuncturist, or any doctor for that matter, know about all treatments or medications you are taking and whether you have a pacemaker, are pregnant, or have breast or other implants. Acupuncture may be risky to your health if you fail to tell the practitioner about any of these matters.

The Sensation of Acupuncture

Acupuncture needles arc metallic, solid, and hair-thin, unlike the thicker, hollow hypodermic needles used in Western medicine to administer treatments or take blood samples. People experience acupuncture differently, but most feel minimal pain as the needles are inserted. Some people are energized by treatment, while others feel relaxed. 34 Some patients may fear acupuncture because they are afraid of needles. Improper needle placement, movement of the patient, or a defect in the needle can cause soreness and pain during treatment.35 This is why it is important to seek treatment only from a qualified acupuncture practitioner.

As important research advances continue to be made on acupuncture worldwide, practitioners and doctors increasingly will work together to give you the best care available.

For More Information

For more information about acupuncture research sponsored by different parts of NIH contact the respective Information Office or Clearinghouse. Call the NIH operator for assistance at 301-490-4000.

For more information about research on acupuncture, contact the NIH National Library of Medicine (NLM), which has published a bibliography of more than 2,000 citations to studies conducted on acupuncture. The bibliography is available on the Internet athttp://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/cbm/acupuncture.html or by writing the NLM, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda. MD 20894. The NLM also has a toll-free telephone number: 1-888-346-3056.

For a database of research on complementary and alternative medicine, including acupuncture access the CAM Citation Index on the NCCAM Web site at http://altmed.od.nih.gov/nccam.

 

Glossary of Terms

Acupuncture – An ancient Chinese health that involves puncturing the skin with hair-thin needles at particular locations, called acupuncture points, oil the patient’s body. Acupuncture is believed to help reduce pa in or change a body function. Sometimes tile needles are twirled given a slight electric charge (see electroacupuncture) or warmed (see moxibustion).

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder – A syndrome primarily found in children and teenagers that is characterized by excessive physical movement, impulsiveness, and lack of attention.

Clinical studies (also clinical trials, clinical outcomes studies, controlled trials, case series, comparative trials, or practice audit evidence) – Tests of a treatment’s effects in humans. Treatments undergo clinical studies only after they have shown promise in laboratory studies of animals. Clinical studies help researchers find out whether a treatment is safe and effective for people. They also tell scientists which treatments are more effective than others.

Electroacupuncture – A variation of traditional acupuncture treatment in which acupuncture or needle points are stimulated electronically.

Electromagnetic signals – The minute electrical impulses that transmit information through and between nerve calls. For example, electromagnetic signals convey information about pain and other sensations within the body’s nervous system.

Fibromyalgia – A complex chronic condition having multiple symptoms, including muscle pain, weakness, and stiffness, fatigue; metabolic disorders, allergies and headaches.

Holistic – Describes therapies based on facts about the “whole person,” including spiritual and mental aspects, not only the specific part of the body being treated. Holistic practitioners may advise changes in diet, physical activity, and other lifestyle factors to help treat a patient’s condition.

Merldians – A traditional Chinese medicine term for the 14 pathways throughout the body for the flow of qi, or vital energy, accessed through acupuncture points.

Moxibustion – The use of dried herbs in acupuncture. The herbs are placed on top of acupuncture needles and burned. This method is believed to be more effective at treating some health conditions than using acupuncture needles alone.

Neurohorinones – Chemical substances made by tissue in the body’s nervous system that can change the structure or function or direct the activity of an organ or organs.

Neurological – A term referring to the body’s nervous system, which starts, oversees, and controls all body functions.

Neurotransmitters – Biochemical substances that stimulate or inhibit nerve impulses in the brain that relay information about external stimuli and sensations, such as pain.

Opioids – Synthetic or naturally occurring chemicals in the brain that may reduce pain and induce sleep.

Placebo – An inactive substance given to a participant in a research study as part of a test of the effects of another substance or treatment. Scientists often compare the effects of active and inactive substances to learn more about how the active substance affects participants.

Preclinical studies – Tests performed after a treatment has been shown in laboratory studies to have a desirable effect. Preclinical studies provide information about a treatment’s harmful side effects and safety it different doses in animals.

Qi (pronounced “chee”) – The Chinese term for vital energy or life force.

Randomized controlled clinical trials – A type of clinical study that is designed to provide information about whether a treatment is safe and effective in humans. These trials generally use two groups of people, one group receives the treatment and the other does not. The participants being studied do not know which group receives the actual treatment.

Traditional Chinese medicine – An ancient system of medicine and health care that is based on the concept of balanced qi or vital energy that flows throughout the body. Components of traditional Chinese medicine include herbal and nutritional therapy restorative physical exercises, medication acupuncture, acupressure, and remedial massage.

Yang – The Chinese concept of positive energy and forces in the universe and human body Acupuncture is believed to remove yang imbalances and bring the body into to balance.

Yin – The Chinese concept of negative energy and forces in the universe and human body. Acupuncture is believed to remove yin imbalances and bring the body into balance.

References

  • Lytle, C.D. An Overview of Acupuncture. 1993, Washington, DC: United States Department of Health and Human Services, Health Sciences Branch, Division of Life Sciences, Office of Science and Technology, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration.
  • Culliton, RD. “Current Utilization of Acupuncture by United States Patients.” National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference on Acupuncture, Program & Abstracts (Bethesda, MD, November 3-5,1997). Sponsors: Office of Alternative Medicine and Office of Medical Applications Research. Bethesda, MD: National Instittites of Health, 1997.
  • Beinfield, H. and Korngold, E.L. Between Heaven and Earth: A Guide to Chinese Medicine. New York, NY: Ballantine Books, 1991.
  • Brown, D. “Three Generations of Alternative Medicine: Behavioral Medicine, Integrated Medicine and Energy Medicine.” Boston University School of Medicine Alumni Report, Fall 1996.
  • Senior, K. “Acupuncture: Can It Take the Pain Away?” Molecular Medicine Today. 1996. 2(4):150-3.
  • Raso. J. Alternative Health Care: A Comprehensive Guide. Buffalo, NY Prometheus Books, 1994.
  • Eskinazi, D. P. “National Institutes of Health Technology Assessment Workshop on Alternative Medicine Acupuncture.” Journal of Alternative and Complementaty Medicine. 1996. 2(1):1-253
  • Tang, N.M., Dong, H.W., Wang, X. M., Tsui, Z.C., and Han, J.S. “Cholecystokinin Antisense RNA Increases the Analgesic Effect Induced by Electroacupuncture or Low Dose Morphine: Conversion of Low Responder Rats into High Responders.” Pain. 1997. 71(1)-.71-80.
  • Cheng, X.D., Wu, G. C., He, Q. Z., and Cao, X. D. “Effect of Electroacuptuncture on the Activities ol Tyrosine Protein Kinasc in Subcellular Fractions of Activited T Lymphocytcs from the Traumatized Rao;.” Immunopharmacology. Forthcoming.
  • Chen, L.B. and Li, S.X. “The Effects of Electrical Acupuncture of Neiguan in the PO2 of the Border Zone Between Ischemic and Non-Ischemic Myocardium in Dogs.” Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine. 1983, 3(2):8 1-8.
  • Lee, H.S. and Kim, J.Y. “Effects on Blood Pressure and Plasma Renin Activity in Two Kidney One Clip Goldblatt Hypertensive Rats.” American Journal of Chinese Medicine. 1994. 22(3-4):215-9.
  • Okada, K_ Oshima, M., and 1 Kawakita, K. “Examination of the Afferentnt Fiber Responsible for the Suppression of Jaw-Open Reflex in Heat, Cold and Manual Acupuncture Stimulation in Anesthetized Rats.” Brain Research. 1996 740(1-2):201-7.
  • National Institutes of Health. Frequently. Asked Questions About Acupuncture. Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health, 1997.
  • Dale, R.A. “Demythologizing Acupuncture Part 1. The Scientific Mechanisms and the Clinical Uses.” Alternative & Complementary Therapies Journal. April 1997. 1(2)-.125-31.
  • Takeshige, C. “Mechanism of Acupuncture Analgesia Based on Animal Experiments.”Scientific Bases of Acupuncture. Berlin, Germany: Springere-Verlag, 1989.
  • Han, J.S. “Acupuncture Activates Endogenous Systems of Analgesia.” National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference on Acupuncture, Program & Abstracts (Bethesda, MD. November 3-5, 1997). Sponsors: Office of Alternative Medicine and Office of Medical Applications of Research. Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health, 1997.
  • Wu, B., Zhou, R.X., and ZI M.S. “Effect of Acupuncture on Interleukin-2 Level and NK Cell Immunoactivity of Peripheral Blood of Malignant Tumor Patients.” Chung Kyo Chung Hsi I Chieh Ho Tsa Chich. 1994.14(9):537-9.
  • Wit, B. “Effect Of Acupuncture on the Regulation of Cell-Mediated Immunity in Patients with Malignant Tumors.” Chen Tzu Yen Chiu. 1995, 20(3):67-71.
  • National Instituties of Health Consensus Panel. Acupuncture National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Statement November 3-5, 1997). Sponsors: Office of Alternaive Medicine –ind Office of Medical Application., of Research Bethesda, MD: N ational Institutes of, Health, 1997.
  • Lao, L., Bergman, S., Langenherg, P, Wong, R., and Berman, B. “Efficacy of Chinese Acupuncture on Postoperative Oral Surgery Pain,” Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology. 1995.79(4):423-8.
  • Lewith, G.T. and Vincent, C. “On the Evaluation of the Clinical Effects of Acupuncture: A Problem Reassessed and a Framework for Future Research.” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 1996. 2(1):79-90.
  • TsibuIiak,VN., Alisov, A.P, and Shatrova,V.P. “Acupuncture Analgesia and Analgesic Transcutaneous Electroneurostimulation in the Early Postoperative Period,”Anesthesiology and Reanimatology 1995. 2:93-8,
  • World Health Organization. Viewpoint on Acupuncture. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, 1979.
  • Bullock, M.L., Pheley.A.M., Kiresuk.T.J., Lenz, S.K., and Culliton, PD. “Characteristies and Complaints of Patients Seeking Therapy at a Hospital-Based Alternative Medicine Clinic.” Journal of Alternative Medicine 1997-30):31-7.
  • Diehl, D.L., Kaplan, G., Coulter, I., Glik, D.,and Hurwitz, E.L.” Use of Acupuncture by American Physicians.” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 1997, 3(2):119-26.
  • Levine, J.D., Gormley, J., and Fields, H.J., “Observatins on the Analgesic Effects of Needle Puncture (Acupuncture).” Pain. 1976.2(2):149-59.
  • Ter Reit, G., Kleijnen, J., and Knipschild, P. “Acupuncture and Chronic Pain: A Criteria-Based Meta-Analysis.” Clinical Epidemiology 1990 43:1191-9.
  • U.S. Food and Drug Administration. “Acupuncture Needles No Longer Investigational”FDA Consumer Magazine June 1996.30(5).
  • Berman, B., Lao, L., Bergman, S., Langenberg, P, Wong, R., Loangenberg, P, and Hochberg, M. “Efficacy of Traditional Chinese Acupuncture in the Treatment of Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study.” Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 1995. (3):139-42.
  • Allen, J.J.B. “An Acupuncture Treatment Study for Unipolar Depression.” Psychological Science. 1998. 9:397-401.
  • Sonenklar, N. Acupuncture and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. National Institutes of Health, Office of Alternative Medicine Research Grant *R21 RR09463. 1993.
  • Milligan, R. Breech Version by Acumoxa. National Instituties of Health, Office of Alternative Medicine Research Grant #R21 RR09327. 1993.
  • Cardini, F. and Weixin, H. “Moxibustion for Correction of Breech Presentation: A Randomized Controlled Trial..” Journal of the American Medical Association. 1998. 280:1580-4
  • American Academy of Medical Acupuncture “Doctor, What’s This Acupuncture All About? Brief Explanation for Patients.“Los Angeles. CA: American Academy of Medical Acupuncture, 1996.
  • Lao, L. “Safety Issues in Acupuncture.” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 1996, 2(1):27-9.

  • Go to NCCAM Resource List Go to NCCAM web site for more current information
  • www.ChineseMedicineDoctor.US

Read Full Post »

Last Sunday I had a lecture for alumni Association of Chinese Medicine in Washington DC. The topic is Liu Wei Di Huang Wan 六味地黄丸.

Here is my Power Point file.六味地黄

Read Full Post »

Everyday, I answer many questions from visited patients or online inquiries, such as:

For some chronic or difficult-to-treat conditions, such Dystonia, or Parkinson Disease, or diabetes, or a mix of many conditions,

“How many sessions’ acupuncture could cure my condition?”

“How much percentage of cure rate of your treatment?”

“I have infertility, how many sessions’ acupuncture could help me get pregnant?”

And, “If you say you could cure it, I will see you.”

Actually, many conditions or illness,disorders are chronic conditions, many of them are difficult-to-treat also, and patients may use conventional medicine for years too.

Frankly, I say “we could not cure most of them”,  in 8 sessions, even in 16 sessions’acupuncture; Or in one month herbal tea treatment. Many of them need long-term management.

We do see some magic results in some cases; we did cure some patients in a very short-term treatments. In a few cases, we even cure the patients’ condition, which they had that for years, with only one or two sessions’ acupuncture or in one day’s herbal tea treatment!

We did see pregnant only after one acupuncture treatment in a few patients with infertility. We did stop the dystonia in one week.

However, for most of the cases, we could improve them; some patients also did get disappointed with our treatments, because their aims did not become the real in one or two month, or other short period of time.

We do tell patients who have difficult-to- treat illness or disorders, they will see some of improvements over the time, some illness or disorders could not be cured in 100% of patients:  some may get “cure”(this is clinically cure, not absolute cure as patient hoped, sometime may get relapse if patients get some trigger), some get improved, some get slight better(or other condition get better, for example, overall condition better), some no result, some worse (please note, the illness, or disorder will get worse under some conditions by itself, not related to acupuncture or Chinese herbs at all).

We could not imagine how many percentage of the patients get “cure”.  For example, we have over 40 patients get pregnant in recent 4 years. We may say about 40-50% of patients (if they had 2 month or more serious treatments) get pregnant!

However, this is a very rough answer. Why? the condition is very complicated.

In these patients who seek acupuncture/herbs for fertility, patients had different causes of infertility, such as FSH high, POCS, ovulation issue, progesterone issue, tube issue, husband sperm issue, etc; many patients had medications, some of them did acupuncture alone, some of them had Chinese herbs too; some of them followed regular treatment strategy, some of them didn’t follow our strategy very well(due to work, due to personal issue, due to something else–subjective or objective reasons); some of them had IVF, IUI etc(with acupuncture or herbs). We could not tell you very detail in a statistic work.

However, it does work!

For acupuncture and Chinese herbology, to many difficult-to-treat illness or disorders, it works! at least it improves patients’ condition in most of the cases.

Importantly, acupuncture basally has little adverse effect. Chinese herbology also has very less side effect if patients see a trained Chinese medicine doctor.

For most of patients with chronic or difficult-to-treat conditions, no.one thing is adjusting the aim based on understanding their own condition well, don’t see a Chinese medicine doctor – he or she promised you–you will get a cure in several treatments(except for some pain condition). Most of time, patients will need more longer treatments.

Be patient.

For the cost-effectiveness, don’t see a provider who promise you have a good result but you pay very little.Most of well-trained, experienced Chinese medicine doctors offer patients a reasonable, affordable fee schedule. For better result, don’t see a provider who had less training and over low fee.

Read Full Post »

1. One gentleman who lives in LA visited me in last week. He has mouth and tongue (etc.) dystonia for many years. He has Botox injections, which helped to diminish the symptoms in some extents. The patients had one month herbal tea (we mailed herbs to him) and two months’ capsule, as well as 20 sessions’ acupuncture (in LA).

His personal experience is acupuncture (did in LA by a local acupuncturist) did not help him very much, the herbal tea seems help his more. During the herbal tea treatment (with acupuncture), he had more relieve in dystonia. He had acupuncture in our office once a day for three days, during that short period, we did not find a significant improvement.

He decide to use herbal tea and acupuncture for a few months and see if Chinese medicine could help him to overcome his dystonia.

Dr.Fan notes: Some of patients may respond the herbal tea better than that in acupuncture.However, some patients have better response in acupuncture. Basically, I recommend acupuncture plus herbal tea. Some time the capsule LIU JUN SAN also plays a good rule.

2. One middle age woman who has neck dystonia, or we call it Crooked, Twisted Neck Cervical Dystonia, or Spasmodic Torticollis (ST). She had to use muscle relaxant and 4 or more tablets of Ibuprofen everyday. After our acupuncture (with LIU JUN SAN capsule) for about 8 sessions, she could have 4 to 5 days pain relief (still use muscle relaxant) per week, and dystonia very less (self report “50% improvement”). She still uses Ibuprofen in 2-3 days/week, but the amount drops to 2 tablets a day. She is still in treatment–acupuncture, twice a week. Due to some reasons, she does not use herbal tea.

3. One young man with Spasmodic Torticollis who lives in Columbia, had Botox injection which leads a partial symptom relief. Using herbal tea and LIU JUN SAN one treatment course(one month), he feels better. So we decide to start the second course herbal tea plus LIU JUN SAN capsule today.

4.One young woman with both hands/fingers dystonia(right hand worse). She has used Botox injection for long time. She has seen me for three years and has used LIU JUN SAN capsule in some times. Yesterday, she came again and still just for LIU JUN SAN. Her experience is LIU JUN SAN capsule helps in eliminating the partial dystonia which Botox injection does not work, i.e. She feels Botox injection plus LIU JUN SAN capsule help more than Botox alone.

5. Three women with Spasmodic Torticollis who had acupuncture here for many years and recovered very well, still come for “tun up” acupuncture, i.e. once 2 weeks or one month. Still using LIU JUN SAN sometime as maintaining treatments.

Dr.Fan notes: Acupuncture at least could work on relaxation, adjusting the neurological function(such as work on Dopamine system,etc), as well as treating the pain and spasm from dystonia. Herbology is more complicated, according to our data, our special herbal formula for dystonia (“tea” and capsule) could diminish the dystonia and very stable.

Read Full Post »

Aupuncture helps infertility

Read Full Post »

Sheng Li Ke Xue Jin Zhan. 2008 Oct;39(4):325-30.

Acupuncture for the treatment of drug addiction

[Article in Chinese]

Cui CL, Wu LZ, Luo F, Han JS.

Neuroscience Research Institute, Peking University, Beijing, China.

Abstract

Over the last three decades there has been an increasing interest in acupuncture treatment of substance abuse around the world. Three important steps can be identified in this field. Dr. H. L. Wen of Hong Kong was the first (1973) to report that acupuncture at 4 body points and 2 ear points combined with electrical stimulation can relieve opiate withdrawal signs in the addicts. The second major step was made by Dr. M. Smith in New York, the head of the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) of the U.S.A., who finalized a protocol (1985), using only ear points without electrical stimulation for the treatment of drug abuse. The recent advance in this field was made by Prof. J. S. Han and his colleagues in Neuroscience Research Institute of the Peking University, Beijing, who characterized a protocol (1992- ), using electrical stimulation of identified frequencies on body points to ameliorate heroin withdrawal signs and prevent relapse to heroin use. In this review, the efficacy of acupuncture and related techniques for the treatment of drug dependence in experimental settings and clinical practice will be reviewed, and the possible mechanisms underlying this effect be discussed.

PMID: 19119614 [PubMed – in process]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19119614

Recently, in our office, there are several patients with drug abuse/withdraw syndrome, after acupuncture, they feel improved, both physically and mentally.

Read Full Post »

Last week, i.e. the first week of April, 2010, there were two women who reported “getting pregnant” after our acupuncture treatment.

Last month, March 2010, we had five reports “of getting pregnant”, three of them used acupuncture (with Chinese medicinal herbs), and two used acupuncture with IVF.

There were two women who got pregnant after their first acupuncture.  This likely meant that acupuncture activated their ovulation.  One of them had very irregular period, in day 27 of the circle she started acupuncture and on day 28 immediate after the first acupuncture treatment she began to ovulate. Another woman who had no-ovulation history, but her period was regular, i.e. 26-28 days. After the first acupuncture treatment she too got pregnant.

Read Full Post »

Dr. Fan was a neurologist for 10 years, an internist for 16 years in Nanjing, China before he moved to Washington DC area. He had treated over 240 Tourette’s syndrome (tics) patients in China, mainly using Chinese herbology, i.e. individualized herbal tea, or prepared herbal pills/extracts.  Most of Tourette’s syndrome patients were Children. One of his formulas is registered in the China FDA Jiangsu Provincial branch as an herbal medicine (hospital use) for Tourette’s syndrome.

In the USA, because his special background in both Chinese Medicine and Neurology, some Tourette’s syndrome patients also come to see him. Using acupuncture, mainly scalp acupuncture, sometime combining herbal medicine, he has treated over 20 patients, most of them are adults. Most of patients feel very good, at least such a CAM (complementary and alternative medicine) modality help them minimizing the tics and also diminishing the anxiety, most important, almost no adverse effect.

Dr. Fan has been invited by a local Chinese medicine association, called Association of Chinese Medicine Doctors from China Mainland in the Greater Washington DC, to discuss the treatments and efficacy in Tourette’s syndrome on April 11, 2010 in Rockville, Maryland.

Read Full Post »

I have written and told dystonia patients: dystonia is only an outside manifestation (symptoms and signs) of inner side brain injury or degeneration / disorder at the basal ganglion area.  In theory, for structural brain damage, there is no way to “cure” this problem.  In conventional medicine, there are several drugs (including Botox) which could diminish the symptoms and surgery would try to injure certain normal areas to reach the balance. 

However, if you using Chinese medicine, after a long-term treatment, say more than half year, we may reach the balance and “clinically Cure” the dystonia (which means controlled very well).

We have had several cases of dystonia in China and in USA, after continuous treatments with acupuncture and Chinese herbal tea, where the patients’ dystonia symptoms are very, very occasionally obscure. You could basically could stop the acupuncture and Chinese herbology. But they do need maintenance, say acupuncture once every week or two, otherwise the symptoms returned (they should be mild treatments).

For the short-term acupuncture or Chinese herbal treatments, patients may get temporary improvements, but this may not create a stable cure.

Read Full Post »

Dear Dr. Fan,                   02/18/2010

My name is L……  I have a 9.5 years old daughter who has dystonia since she was about 6 years old. The dystonia started with her right leg, and now also affect her left leg.
She also has mild dystonia on her eyes and mouth. Since the dystonia started, Josephine has been having problem with walking. Her feet turned inward and also stiff.
She walks very very slow, and her gait makes it even worse. She also gets a lot of headache.
Her neurologist prescribed her Artane for the dystonia, and she has been taking it until today.
 
I look forward to have alternative treatment such as acupuncture, and Chinese herbal medication. For right now I can not take her outside California to visit your clinic, but I am working on it to be able to take her seeing you. However, I would like her to get Chinese herbal medication and start taking it asap.
 
I am still working on having her video and sending it to you. Please respond to me about how we could get her Chinese herbal medication.  Her insurance will not cover this alternative treatment, so we will pay by ourselves. So please also let us know the cost of the medication.
 
Thank you very much for returning my call this morning. I have a very high hope after reading your website. I realize dystonia is not something that can be cured, but at least if it can be mild it will mean so much for my daughter’s life. Looking forward to hearing from you.
 
Sincerely,
 
L

The Reply from Dr. Arthur Fan 02/19/2010 9:00AM

Dear Lenny, 

That is correct. Almost all of treatments for dystonia in conventional medicine is symptom treatment (no cure). Using Chinese medicine, acupuncture plus herbs, it is also very hard to be cured in a short time. However, we do have some patients “cured”! 

That does the “cured” mean in dystonia? 

Answer: most of dystonia symptoms gone and just need mild herbal medicine or acupuncture maintenance. The treatment for that aim is at least 6 month to one year, or even more.

These treatments are not payable from your insurance in current time.  And you need patience.

Please give me her other information

Appetite, bowel movement condition, sleep condition.

Tongue color–coating (white? yellow? thin or thick) and tongue color(pink or very red),

Pulse (you could let a local acupuncturist have a look).

For more information, such as how much the fees for herbs, capsule, etc. You could read the detail online in my blog.www.arthuryinfan.wordpress.com(dystonia part)

Arthur Yin Fan, PhD,CMD,LAc

McLean Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, PLC
8214 Old Courthouse Road, Tysons Square Office Park,
Vienna, VA 22182.
Phone:(703)499-4428; Fax:(703)547-8197

Read Full Post »

转载请注明出处:http://www.1kum.com/pages/QJKolsln.html 

Edited by Dr.Arthur Fan, www.ChinesemedicineDoctor.us

 肌张力障碍(Dystonia)是一种不随意的运动。是一组由身体骨骼肌的协同肌和拮抗肌的不协调,且间歇持续收缩所造成的部分躯体重复的不自主运动和异常位置姿势的症状群。又称为肌张力障碍综合征(Dystonia Syndrome)。可由中枢神经系统器质性病变(如基底核病变)或不明原因引起,前者称为继发性肌张力障碍,后者称为原发性肌张力障碍。主要包括以下几种疾病:

 1.扭转痉挛(Torsion Spasm) 又名扭转性肌张力障碍(Torsion Dystonia)或变形性肌张力障碍(Dystonia Musculorun Deformans)。临床上以肌张力障碍和四肢、躯干甚至全身的剧烈而不随意的扭转为特征。肌张力在肢体扭转时增高,扭转停止时则正常。

 2.痉挛性斜颈(Spasmodic Torticollis)是由于颈部肌肉痉挛性或强直性收缩造成的一种头部旋转性姿势,颈部的深浅肌肉均可受累,但以胸锁乳头肌、斜方肌、三角肌及颈夹肌的收缩最为常见。起病缓慢,可发生于任何年龄,中年人起病多见。多见于锥体外系器质性损害。

 3.美基综合征(Meige Syndrome) 由法国Heury Meige医师(1910)首先描述,又称特发性眼睑痉挛,即口下颌肌张力障碍综合征,以双眼睑痉挛和口面部肌肉对称性不规则痉挛性收缩为临床特征。多见于中老年人,平均发病年龄为50岁,男女比例为1:2~3,30岁以前发病者少见。

 4.手足徐动症(Sthetosis) 又称指划运动、易变性痉挛(Mobile Spasm),它是一个综合征,为多种神经系统疾患的一种表现,是一种由不自主运动和异常姿势复合在一起的一种异常运动,临床以肌强直和手足发生缓慢不规则的徐动为特征表现。根据其受累部位可分为偏侧性和双侧性。

 中医学文献中无上述四种病患的具体论述,根据其临床表现,可归属于中医脑病中的“痉病”、“瘛疭、“搐搦”、“风搐”、“筋惕肉瞤”等病证范畴,历代有关记载较多。如《诸病源候论》曰:“筋不得屈伸者,是筋急挛缩,不得伸也。”所述症状与本组病证有相似之处。《景岳全书·痉证》认为:“凡属阴虚血少之辈,不能营养筋脉,以致搐、挛、僵仆者,皆是此症。”指出本组疾病由阴血不足、失于濡养所致。《证治准绳·七窍门》云:“谓目睥不待人之开合而自牵拽振跳也,乃气分之病,属肝脾二经络牵振之患。人皆呼为风,殊不知血虚而气不顺,非纯风也。”指出肝脾气血亏虚,血虚生风,虚风上犯清空,扰乱头面经脉,气血流行失常,是形成以上病证的主要病因病机。

 西医目前对肌张力障碍的症状控制尚无特效方法,主要采用症状局部注射肉毒杆菌毒素、脑深部电刺激以及一些对症治疗的药物,中医在辨证论治的基础上,加上辨病用药,对于减轻病情有一定的疗效,部分患者可以临床治愈。 

 薛必贞等治疗痉挛性斜颈1例,认为其病因为气虚血瘀,风痰阻络,治以益气活血,化痰熄风,药用黄芪、丹参、白芍、薏苡仁各30g,当归、桃仁、红花各10g,川芎6g,赤芍15g,党参、半夏各12g,甘草3g o.每日1剂水煎服,同时停用奋乃静:,安坦减量至逐渐停用,1周后痉挛症状明显减轻,继续服用1个月,患者舌质稍红,舌苔减少,考虑为久病伤阴,且长时间应用化痰、祛瘀药,有耗阴伤正之弊,遂在原方基础上加生地黄、麦冬各15g,将甘草改为炙甘草10g,另加鸡子黄2枚冲服,取“大定风珠”之义,再继续服药2个月,颈部痉挛症状消失,复查脑电图正常。总疗程半年,痊愈。随访半年未见复发。 (薛必贞,薛轴.中医药治愈痉挛性斜颈l例.山西中医,1992<3>:36)

 陈幸生针刺治疗1例7岁患儿,辨证为肝血亏损,肝风内动,窍闭神匿,选人中、风府、后溪为主穴,取华佗夹脊、上廉泉、肩髑、外关、合谷、阳陵泉、足三里、三阴交、太溪为配穴。操作方法:人中用雀啄法,行针1分钟,风府向咽喉方向斜刺1.5~2寸,患儿出现触电感后(身体抖动)即出针,后溪向劳宫透刺,外关透刺内关,肩髑透刺极泉,阳陵泉透刺阴陵泉,均用捻转平补平泻法。上廉泉用1.5寸针向舌根方向行鸡瓜刺,不留针。足三里、三阴交、太溪均直刺行捻转补法。华佗夹脊用1.5寸针略向脊柱方向斜刺,行捻转泻法,主穴每天必用,其他穴位交替使用,留针30分钟,10分钟行针一次,每日治疗1次,6次为一疗程。疗程间隔1天。经用上方治疗5天后患儿扭转略有好转,夜间能人睡5~6小时,饮食增加,余症同前。3个疗程后病情显著改善。遂用上方去风府、足三里,加哑门、委中,继续治疗1个月,扭转痉挛,挤眉弄眼,口角抽动诸症消失,言语基本正常,四肢肌力达V级,肌张力正常,痊愈出院。(陈幸生.针刺治疗扭转痉挛综合征.针灸临床杂志,1995<10>:38)

 章薇等以针刺阳陵泉为主治疗扭转痉挛,并设足三里组为对照组。主穴:阳陵泉或足三里(双)。辨证取穴:①气虚血瘀取气海、百会、三阴交、血海、脾俞。②阴虚阳亢取太溪、太冲、三阴交、风池、肝俞、。肾俞。③风痰阻络取风池、丰隆、行间、公孙、阴陵泉、脾俞。④气滞血瘀取膈俞、血海、太冲、合谷。⑤气血亏虚取脾俞、血海、三阴交、气海。观察组以阳陵泉为主穴,对照组以足三里为主穴,辅以辨证取穴,针刺上、下午各1次。用30号10cm毫针深刺6cm,快速进针,快速小幅度捻转1分钟,留针30分钟,拔针前重复操作1次,1个月为一疗程,两组均治疗2个疗程。结果表明阳陵泉治疗扭转痉挛作用明显优于足三里,临床效果良好。(章薇,利伍立,赵艳玲.针刺阳陵泉为主治疗痉挛性瘫痪52例临床观察.中国医刊,1999<3>:52)

 马臣针刺治疗右侧扭转痉挛1例,取穴:风池、合谷、丰隆、完骨(右)、扶突(右)、肩髑(右)、肩贞(右)、曲池(右),手法用泻法,留针30分钟,每10分钟行针一次,每日治疗1次,10次为一疗程,共治疗4个疗程,右肩抽动及头颈向左扭转完全停止,可从事正常工作。半年后随访,未见复发。(马臣.扭转痉挛案.中国针灸,1997(8):485) 

郭伦聪等用生脉注射液10ml,加10%葡萄糖注射液500ral,每日1次静滴,治疗因服用胃复安所致的扭转痉挛、痉挛性斜颈及手足徐动症。共治疗10例,7例在24小时内痊愈,3例在48小时内痊愈。(郭伦聪,柯明远.生脉注射液治疗胃复安所致锥体外系反应10例.福建中医药,1999<3>:封四)

徐明涟等采用中西医结合方法治疗扭转痉挛1例。中医治疗:证属阳虚湿阻,经气不利,筋脉失养,以附子汤合羌活胜湿汤加味治疗。药用:炮附子12g,党参20g,茯苓30g,白术12g,白芍30g,羌活12g,独活12g,防风12g,蔓荆子12g,葛根20g,黄柏10g,当归12g,川芎12g,水煎服。服28剂,症状明显缓解,仅感腰软无力,双下肢发凉怕冷,上方加狗脊12g、怀牛膝15g、五加皮5g以补肝肾壮筋骨,服18剂,诸证悉除,再予上方12剂继服以巩固疗效。西药治疗:患者微量元素检测提示血钙、锌偏低,遂予葡萄糖酸钙1g口服,每日3次;复合蛋白锌3片口服,每日3次;妙纳50rag口服,每日3次。共服2个月。痊愈出院后两个月患者来复查,完全恢复正常。(徐明涟,胡志强.中西医结合治愈扭转痉挛1例.中国中西医结合杂志,1996<12>:720) 

王东等根据Meige综合征的证候辨证施治,对4例患者用不同手法针灸治疗:1例取穴足三里、外关、曲池、完骨、风池、足三里用补法,完骨烧山火,余穴均用泻法;1例取穴足三里、血海、完骨、风池,手法同前;1例取穴足三里、合谷、养老、昆仑、风池、风府,用补法;l例取穴足三里、合谷、风池、风府、哑门,用补法。临床收到一定疗效。(王东,苏惠琳.针灸治疗Meige综合征4例.中国中医眼科杂志,1996<3>:158) 

徐福升等运用中西医结合疗法治疗Meige综合征。方法:黄芪注射液(成都地奥生产,每支2ml,相当于黄芪4g)16ml加入10%葡萄糖注射液300~400ml中静脉滴注,每日1次;复方丹参液(上海第一制药厂生产,每支2ml,相当于丹参、降香各2g)20ml加入5%的葡萄糖注射液250m|静脉滴注,每日1次,连用2周。同时给左旋多巴(每片250mg)250rag口服,每日4次,每隔2日增加500mg,到病情稳定时,维持治疗量,疗程2周。治疗2周,共治疗12例,治愈5例,有效7例。未发现药物的不良反应。(徐福升,陈方焘,徐哲.黄芪丹参注射液合左旋多巴治疗老年Meige综合征12例.安徽中医学院学报,1999(4):23)

Read Full Post »

Wien Med Wochenschr. 1998;148(19):457-8.[Article in German]

Nepp J, Wenzel T, Kuchar A, Steinkogler FJ.

Universitätsklinik für Augenheilkunde und Optometrie, Wien. johannes.nepp@akh-wien.ac.at

Blepharospasm is a dystonia of the orbicularis muscle. The background is still unknown, but it appears together with organic and psychic diseases. The therapy with botulinum toxine is symptomatically but efficient. Because of the relaxing effect on the psychological and autonomous nervous disorders we performed a pilot study with acupuncture. There was a neurological observation first, then a ophthalmologic examination of the ocular surface. Blepharospasm was measured by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), the social disorders by the Elston-Score. We performed acupuncture treatment 10 times once weekly. The used points were local points with higher sensitivity, and points with empiric relaxation effect. 5 patients were included. The mean of Elston score was 3 before acupuncture and 4 after acupuncture. The VAS increased from 33.3 to 69/100 points. But there were fluctuations of dystonias. In conclusion acupuncture maybe a good method for this difficult disease additionally.

Read Full Post »

(This is a letter from Patient Nancy L.C., Who started her study in a Chinese medicine School in August, 2009 when she is 57 years old, she recovered from her multiple illness/disordrs after Dr.Fan’s treatments. She is the third Dr.Fan’s  patients who started to learn Chinese Medicine since 2003)

April 25, 2009                                                      

8214 Old Courthouse Road,

Tysons Square Office Park,

Vienna, Virginia 22182

Dear Dr.Fan:

When I first visited you in November 2008, I was weak, cold, and miserable. I had been diagnosed with weak adrenal glands and hypothyroidism. I hardly ate anything other than a little meat. I really didn’t know what to eat. I had no energy. I was too thin.I slept poorly. I was sad and worried about everything. My hormones were a mess because my doctor had told me to use progesterone cream for anxiety, but then I developed intestinal yeast as a result. I was taking LOTS of vitamin supplements(Dr.Fan note: she used over 30 supplements her doctors had refered when she showed me in initial visit),but they were just making me cold too.

Although my brain wasn’t working too well, I knew I was finally on the right path when you explained that acupuncture would address the yeast by changing the environment of my body rather than by simply “attacking” yeast.Yeast thrives in moist enviroment, so I had to became warm and dry. I drank ginger tea as you suggested and as I continue the twice-weekly acupuncture treatments, my mood improved and I began to sleep better.

When I explained my varying day-to-day energy levels, you gave me Chinese herbs to make tea, and more dietary suggestions. When you told me to eat “wheat noodles”, I thought you had lost your mind, but then I at them and started to gain some wheat! You told me to eat more! So I’ve probably eaten 40 pounds of organic pasa since mid-February ( along with chicken and winter squash), and have gained 10 pounds of ME! How much better I feel!

In my opinion, you truly examplify the most important qualities of a good practioner. You’re knowledgeable about Chinese medicine and always listen to my questions and concerns. You take the time to provide answers and explainations to the extent that I need. You exhibit humility, a state of non-pretense, and are sensitive and show compassion toward me as a person. You don’t treat me as if I am simply an illness,but you treat me as another human being with a heart and spirit. You have empowered me to take responsibility for my own healing by explaining the benefits of using Chinese herbs over vitamin supplements, giving me nutritional recomendations to counteract my disharmony patterns, and suggesting I take T’ai Chi lessions and consider other lifestyle changes. You always have a pleasant and positive attitude, and are supportive and encouraging with respect to my healing process. You have integrity and Itrust you more than any other healthcare practitioner I ‘ve seen. I’m very glad I found you and grateful for your care in helping and recover.

Sincerely,

Nancy L.C. (signature omited)

Arlington, VA

Read Full Post »

The paper list of Dr.Arthur Yin Fan, published in Chinese  1

Read Full Post »