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Posts Tagged ‘annandale’

Cervical dystonia case

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Acupuncture helped the mother overcome the migraine and hypertension during pregnancy

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Dr. Fan,
I hope you remember me, Simara. I used to go to your office for my bad back pain every weekend. I had an emergency at home with my father who got really ill and eventually passed away. I had to stay at home to take care for some things with my mother and the stay I had envisioned prolonged for a little bit. I just wanted to tell you thank you from the bottom of my heart beacuse you really made me feel better and whenever I couldn’t walk whenever I came into your office, an hour later I felt like it never happened. You really care for your patients and you are a really sweet man. I can honestly say you’re the best doctor I’ve ever had and I think you cured my back pain because thru all this time I haven’t been in Virginia, my back doesn’t bother me anymore. I will be back but I just wanted to let you know how grateful I am for basically curing me.
I also want to say that your assistant April, she is the sweetest, most attentive and professional person I’ve ever met. I miss you guys very much and hopefully I will be back very soon. I will go by the office to say hi.
Dr. Fan, thank you so much for being the man that you are and I hope you keep working healing people for a long, long, long time. Xie Xié.
Simara C.
Dr.Arthur Fan notes: acupuncture is one of most effective therapies in low back pain management, according to clinical trials and long term clinical practice.

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September 6, 2012

Doctor Fan,

I want to thank you for using your expert acupuncture techniques to solve my long lasting Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS).

Traditional medicine did not work and your remedies have allowed me to sleep well at night.

Thank you very much.

Sincerely,

P. A.

Dr.Arthur fan notes: after acupuncture, patient feels no longer have restless leg syndrome, and migraine gone, sleep very soundly.

And, very important the mood much calm.

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This morning, a lady reported her pregnancy test strong positive–got pregnant. This is no.65 patient got pregnant, since 2007, by our acupuncture treatments.

She is 33 years old, married for 6 years, and tried seriously to get conceive for over one years. According to her, her husband is healthy and the sperm test was good. She also has a lot acne, so she hope we could adjust her hormones for both acne and fertility.

When she first saw me, she was in day 14 of her period cycle (she had  28-days-cycles before). I gave her acupuncture according to our protocol, and herb pills. after 8 sessions acupuncture, she felt her cervical mucus is slippery and very stretchable, better than before. after another two weeks, her period didn’t come. Then her pregnancy test became positive.

 

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BENIGN ESSENTIAL TREMOR RESOLVED WITH ACUPUNCTURE

 

Cristina S. de la Torre, M.D.

 

 Medical Acupuncture. A Journal For Physicians By Physicians

Fall / Winter 1989 – Volume 1 / Number 1
“Aurum Nostrum Non Est Aurum Vulgi”

 

ABSTRACT– This article reviews the complete resolution of a case of benign essential tremor, in a patient treated with acupuncture, who previously had limited response to drug therapy. Three treatments were given over a three-week period. The patient’s tremor of the head and upper extremities resolved 100%, and she has remained asymptomatic to date (5 months after the last treatment).

 

     In April, 1989, a 38-year-old white female, presented with the chief complaint of intolerable shaking of her head for over one year. From 1987 until then, she was treated for a variety of routine conditions at the practice. She had been diagnosed as having benign essential tremor for many years. Her mother, also a patient of the practice, reported that the patient suffered tremor of the upper extremities since approximately age 2~3, being nicknamed “shaky bones” by her peers. The main medications were propanolol and diazepam, which only provided modest reduction in the intensity of the tremor.
Her condition had been extensively studied at several medical centers, where she was repeatedly told that “she had to learn to live with the tremor, hopefully obtaining some relief by taking prescribed medications”.
The patient’s family history was significant for alcoholism in both parents, a disease which had also afflicted her. She became a heavy drinker between the ages of 21 and 25, and then again between 35 and 37. Other significant medical history included asthma in childhood, excision of an ovarian cyst in 1970, and a twin pregnancy delivery in 1982. The patient is married and owns a successful business.
Marked tremor of the upper extremities (1,2,3), both postural and during voluntary activity, was observed since her first visit in 1987. Around February, 1988, the patient began to notice tremor of her head, which had not been present previously. In May, 1988, she was hospitalized for alcohol detoxification. Soon after discharge, she complained of worsening of her head tremor. She continued sober but increasingly tremulous u ntil April, 1989, when she returned, requesting acupuncture to help her with her head tremor, which by then had become intolerable.
The patient’s constitution was determined to be JUE YIN- Wood, on the East position, according to Dr. Yves Requena’s classification (4). Treatment was then organized following Dr. Maurice Mussat’s “Energy of Living Systems” theory (5,6), specifically the use of triangular equilibration.
Her first treatment, on April 14, 1989, consisted of a JUE YIN triangular equilibration in evolution, using points along the JUE YIN (Lived Master of the Heart), ABSOLUTE YIN (Conception Vessel), and YANG MING (Large Intestine/Stomach).
On her follow-up visit, one week later, she reported great improvement of her head tremor, and mentioned the onset of an unusual craving for sweets. She was then treated with a TAE YIN simple triangular equilibration, with points on TAE YIN (Spleen/ Lung), YANG MING and ABSOLUTE YANG (Governor Vessel).
On her third visit, on April 27, she reported further improvement of her head tremor, and an unexpected complete resolution of her upper extremities tremor. It was then decided to conclude her treatment series with a SHAO YANG simple triangular equilibration (Triple Heater/Gall Bladder), SHAO YIN (Kidney/Hear[), and ABSOLUTE YANG. She was instructed to return 3 weeks later for reassessment.
She did not return until 2 months later, on June 27, when she reported complete resolution of both her upper extremities and head tremor. She was still taking di-azepam, 5 mg twice a day, but had stopped taking propanelei. She was advised to taper off the diazepam, and return for another series of acupuncture treatments, should symptoms recur.
She did not return until 3 months later, on September 28, when she brought in her mother for treatment. At the time, the patient reported no recurrence of her symptoms, being free of tremor for 5 months to date, and without taking any medications. A physical examination, including neurological evaluation, was normal.

 

DISCUSSION 
Tremors may be physiologic or a symptom of neurologic disease, such as tumors, trauma, infections, demyelinating disease, Parkinson’s disease, peripheral neuropathy, and essential tremor (7). Benign essential tremor (called familial or hereditary tremor when there is a positive family history) is thought to be inherited as a Mendelian autosomal dominant trait. No neuropathological lesion has been recognized in post mortem examinations, its neurochemistry is unknown, and its pathophysiology is obscure (8). It may appear at almost any time, often in early adult life, but it may begin in childhood (9}. It is characterized by coarse, rhythmic and symmetric tremor, persisting throughout the range of motion of voluntary activity, increasing in amplitude as the limb approaches an object (finger-to-nose test), or in handling or bringing food or liquid to the mouth.
The frequency of the tremor varies between 6 and 12 Hz, most commonly recording 6-8 Hz (10). The tremor amplitude diminishes with rest and the use of alcohol, and is exacerbated by emotional and physical stress. Tremor increases m amplitude with age, and may eventually interfere with fine movements.
Propanolol (in doses of 40-240 mg/day) and other beta-antagonists which pass the blood-brain barrier and therefore have central and peripheral actions, have been used with varying responses, but no definitive cure (11,12). More recently, primidone has been reported to be as effective as propanolol in treating this condition (13). Alcohol, although the most effective agent, is not recommended. Chronic alcoholism in patients with essential tremor is often a consequence of their attempts to control the symptoms by drinking (14).
The treatment of tremors with acupuncture has 1cng been documented in the classical Chinese medical texts, and continued to be reported in the European and American literature (15), as “problems related to Wind of External and Internal origin”.
For wider clinical applications, the therapeutic response of benign essential tremor to acupuncture needs to be studied in a significant sample of patients with this same condition. However, the complexity of medical acupuncture is such that treatment protocols may be inadequate to incorporate the necessary data into a useful diagnostic and therapeutic formulation (16). The patient’s own diagram of constitutional characteristics, past history, family history, and associated symptoms, eventually determine the most appropriate therapeutic intervention in each case.
With this individualized approach, other functional movement disorders may also be considered as potentially responsive to Medical Acupuncture. Concomitantly, further observations of the effect of acupuncture on tremors may lead to unexpected insights into intrinsic aspects of the motor system.

 

REFERENCES 
1. Critchley E. Clinical manifestations of essential tremor. J. Neurology and Neurosurgery- Psychiatry. 1972; 35: 365-75.

 

2. Critchley M. Observations on essential (heredo-familial) tremor. Brain. 1949; 72: 113-39.

 

3. Marshall J. Observations on essential tremor. J. Neurology and Neurosurgery-Psychiatry. 1962; 25: 122-25.

 

4. Requena Y. Terrains and pathology in acupuncture. Vol I- Correlation with diathetic medicine. Paradigm Publications, Brookline, MA. 1986.

 

5. Mussat M. Energetique des Systemes Vivants. Medecine et Sciences Internationales, Paris. 1982. Transl. by J.M. Helms, 1983.

 

6. Mussat M. Cours d’Energetique des Systemes Vivants Appliquee a la Acupuncture. 1ere, 2eme, et 3eme Annee. Ecole Superieure d’Acupuncture Francaise. 1983.

 

7. Koller W., Lang A. et al. Psychogenic tremors. Neurology 1989; 39: 1094-99.

 

8. Adams R.D., & Victor, M. Principles of neurology- 4th edition. McGraw-Hill Information Services Co., New York. 1989, chapter 5.

 

9. Young R.R. In: Diseases of the nervous system- clinical neurobiology. Edited by Ashbury A.K. et al. W.B. Saunders Co. 1986, Vol 1, chapter 32.

 

10. Weiner W.J. & Goetz C.G. Neurology for the non-neurologist. 2nd edition. J.B.Lippincott Co., Philadelphia. 1989.

 

11. Dupont E., Hansen H.J. et al. Treatment of benign essential tremor with propanolol. Acta NeuroL Scand. 1973; 49: 75-84.

 

12. Winkler G.F., & Young R.R. Efficacy of chronic propanolol therapy in action tremors of the familial, senile or essential varieties. New Eng. J. Med. 1974; 290: 984-88.

 

13. Findley L.I., Cieeves L. et al. Primidone in essential tremor of the hands and head: A double blind controlled clinical study. J. Neurology and Neurosurgery- Psychiatry. 1985; 48: 911-15.

 

14. Growdon J.H., Shahani B.T. et al. The effect of alcohol on essential tremor. Neurology. 1975; 25: 259-62.

 

15. Kaptchuk T.J. The webb that has no weaver- understanding Chinese medicine. Congdon & Weed, New York. 1983.

 

16. UCLA Extension. Medical Acupuncture for Physicians. Santa Monica, California. J.M. Helms, course chairman.

www.ChineseMedicineDoctor.us


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Clin Exp Hypertens. 2010;32(7):423-5. Epub 2010 Sep 9.

Cupping for hypertension: a systematic review.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20828224

Lee MS, Choi TY, Shin BC, Kim JI, Nam SS. Source Division of Standard Research, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon, South Korea. drmslee@gmail.com

Abstract

The objective of this review is to assess the clinical evidence for or against cupping as a treatment for hypertension. We searched the literature using 15 databases from their inception to 30 June 2009, without language restrictions. We included all clinical trials (CTs) of cupping to treat hypertension in human patients. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane criteria. Two CTs met all inclusion criteria. One RCT (randomized CT) assessed the effectiveness of dry cupping on changes in cerebral vascular function compared with drug therapy. Their results suggested significant effect in favor of cupping on vascular compliance and degree of vascular filling. One uncontrolled observational study (UOS) tested wet cupping for acute hypertension and found that a one-time treatment reduced blood pressure. In conclusion, the evidence is not significantly convincing to suggest cupping is effective for treating hypertension. Further research is required to investigate whether it generates any specific effects for that condition.

Dr.Arthur Fan’s view:

Cupping is an effective, safe and easy way to treat the hypertension, esp. for the satge one.  However, due to limited information, many people could not know this is an effective way to treat people’s hypertension. Investing for its scientific study is a little bit charllenge, because this study will not give the industry any benefit (for drug study may have a big “money return”.)

Patients could use cupping by themselve in home, once a day for two weeks, and take BP everyday, then could see how effective it is!

The mechanism of cupping, is adjusting the “Qi flow” (adjusting autonomic nervous system), activating the blood circulation(at least the microcirculation), then BP automatically back to normal.

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