Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Acupuncture history in America’ Category

Chen Y. A Perspective of Acupuncture Education in the US JCMAH.MS.ID.555773

Citation: Chen Y. A Perspective of Acupuncture Education in the United States. J Complement Med Alt Healthcare. 2019; 9(5): 555773. DOI: 0.19080/JCMAH.2019.09.555773

A good and informative article.

Abstract
Acupuncture education in the United States has a history of almost 50 years. The entry-level professional training dates back to the 1980’s as a milestone establishment of Council of Colleges of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine (CCAOM), Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine (ACAOM) and National Certification Commission for Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM). Besides mainland China, America has the largest organized and influential acupuncture and Chinese Medicine education system in the world. Now 54 accredited acupuncture colleges have offered Master’s Programs, Professional Doctoral Programs, and Advanced Practical Doctorial (DAOM) Programs in comprehensive standards and competencies. Although there are some challenging issues, acupuncture education trends move forward into entry-level doctoral level training, regional and national accreditation, and system-based education, which will lead this profession to play a great role in the American integrative medical system.
Keywords: Acupuncture; Education; Competencies; America

 

Read Full Post »

Fan AY. Gim Shek Ju赵金石. Chinese Medicine Culture 2016;1, 58-61

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/337064256_Gim_Shek_Ju_A_Pioneer_in_Acupuncture_Chinese_Medicine_Education_in_the_United_States

Citation: Fan AY. Gim Shek Ju: A Pioneer in Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine Education in the United States. Journal of Chinese Medicine Culture 2016; 1:58-61.

 

Gim Shek Ju: A Pioneer in Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine Education in the United States

Arthur Yin Fan

McLean Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, PLC. Vienna, VA 22182, USA

KEYWORDS: acupuncture; Chinese medicine; United States; Education; history of medicine; Gim Shek Ju

Correspondence: Arthur Yin Fan; Tel: +1-(703) 499-4428; E-mail: ArthurFan@ChineseMedicineDoctor.US

 

Several stories of pioneers establishing acupuncture and Chinese medicine (ACM) practices in the United States (U.S.) have been documented. However, the establishment of actual schools for acupuncture and Chinese medicine is one of the key signs that ACM has become an established profession. One of the first people who wanted to set-up a school for Chinese medicine in the United States was Dr. Tom Foo Yuen (谭富园, 89, Aug 7, 1858 – Jul 10, 1947) during the late 1800s in Los Angles, California. However, it was not until the time period of 1969-1970 that the first ACM school was established in the U.S. The school was called the Institute for Taoist Study in LA, with Dr. Gim Shek Ju as the only teacher.

Based on the recollection from some of his students, Dr. Gim Shek Ju (Gim, in short; 赵金石) was impressed by a group of Tai Chi students, most of them students at the University of California in Los Angles (UCLA).  At the urging of his friend’s Tai Chi students, he used acupuncture to treat these students and some of their relatives during a Chinese New Year celebration in Chinatown, LA  in 1969. It was after these acupuncture treatments that these students became interested in ACM and had their Tai Chi teacher, Master Marshall Hoo, a close friend of Gim, persuade Gim to teach them ACM. Gim broke the old Chinese tradition (that means only teaching to those within the family) and taught two classes of non-Asian students ACM during 1969 to 1970. These two classes of students became the key people in ACM development in the U.S., both in acupuncture or Chinese medicine legislation and professional development of Chinese medicine in the U.S. The classes taught by Gim were the origin of three professions: acupuncture and Chinese or Oriental medicine (for licensed acupuncturists, LAc or Oriental medicine doctors, OMD), medical acupuncture (for MD acupuncturists) and animal or veterinary acupuncture (for DVM acupuncturists) in the U.S.

Figure 1. Dr. Gim Shek Ju with a Shaolin Monk.

Dr. Ju arrived in the U.S. around the 1950s (Dr. Fan notes: based on personal research, he should arrive in 1957).  He did not settle in Chinatown, LA until the 1960s (around 1968).  He was still traveling back and forth to Hong Kong at that time because his own family was there.  He practice in LA was funded and organized by his third wife, Helen Robertson.  The clinic was in the apartment that they lived in. Helen was a veterinarian from Downey, CA and a former patient of Dr.Ju. She had suffered a debilitating trauma from a car accident that damaged her spine to the point that she could not stand up, but remained bent at a 90 degree angle.  After finding Dr. Ju via word of mouth, she was able to improve her condition.  Most of Dr.Ju’s patients were Caucasian, and not Chinese.  In fact, very few Chinese came to see him (the author notes: it is opposite to our “common sense”—many people believe Chinese medicine had its market because Chinese people, or say, Asian community uses it more).  Most of his patients were extremely ill, and suffering with debilitating pain.  Dr. Ju was able to treat patients with very little communication.  According to his daughter, Mamie Ju, Dr. Ju’s powers of intuition and understanding or hearing the body was probably daunting to many…even modern-day TCM practitioners.  But it was the “old” way, and in Mamie opinion, the right way to practice.  “Ancient TCM practitioners were most likely practicing Shamans, and I believe my father was a Shaman by birth”.  This is what made him very special. But it is difficult to explain this, even to other TCM practitioners.

Figure 2. Dr. Gim Shek Ju practice Tai Chi with a friend.

 

Figure 3. Dr. Tin Yau So in classroom of New England School of Acupuncture.

Dr.Ju and Dr. Tin Yau So (苏天佑) were colleagues at the Hong Kong College of Acupuncture; Dr. So was the founder. Dr.Ju strongly recommended Dr. So as the best teacher in ACM and let his students resume ACM under Dr. So; he flied with his student Steven Rosenblatt, as well as Steven’ s wife Kathleen, to Hong Kong to meet Dr. So, where these two American students actually studied there for one year in 1972. Per the invitation and handling of a visa by the National Acupuncture Association (founded by Dr.Ju’s students Bill Prensky, Steven Rosenblatt, etc.) , Dr. So arrived in LA in October,1973  as an acupuncturist in the UCLA acupuncture clinic.

Dr. So was one of the most influential individuals of the 20th century by formally bringing acupuncture education to the United States. He established the first acupuncture school in the U.S., the New England School of Acupuncture in Newton, Massachusetts in 1975 with the help of his (also Dr. Ju’s) students Steven Rosenblatt, Gene Bruno, Bill Prensky, etc. after overcoming great difficulties. To some extent, I could say that it was Dr. Gim Shek Ju who brought Dr. So to the U.S. that allowed him to become the father of Acupuncture and Chinese medicine education in the U.S.

Dr.Ju had a very thriving acupuncture practice treating patients inside his three bedroom apartment. He used one of the bedrooms as his main office and treatment room.  His living room was the waiting room.  There were people there from 8AM until after 5PM, but usually no later than 6PM. He often worked six days a week and was always busy doing something. He rarely rested.  He kept a very strict schedule.  He got up every morning before dawn and practiced Tai Chi. No-one knows when he learned Tai Chi.  Then he started his working day at 8AM.  He took a lunch break exactly at noon every day, and ate lunch in Chinatown with friends, probably his students too, and sometimes with his children on the weekends.  Dr.Ju was usually in bed by 8PM unless he had other things to do.  His students were not around regularly… or at least not on a regular basis.  Dr.Ju never really grasped the English language. His daughter often had to translate for patients who were trying to book appointments over the phone. Mamie often had to schedule appointments for him when he was out. His daughter…making trips to the herbal store to get formulas, and helping him in the room with some of the female patients.  Dr.Ju took many patients, the apartment was filled with people non-stop, and he accepted treatments outside of the clinic as well.  It was not unusual for his daughter to come home and find a limousine parked outside our apartment either waiting to pick up Dr.Ju or to drop him off. Dr. Ju never spoke about who his patients were.  He kept many of those things very, very private. He would not discuss many cases or anything in great detail.

His daughter remembers, when he was still involved with his American students, “I remember accompanying my father to UCLA where he gave a lecture about meridian/channel theory and how acupuncture worked.  Another thing my father did that was rather record-breaking at the time was perform anesthesia on a wisdom tooth patient using acupuncture.  I was maybe about 11 years-old at the time (1975) and I remember watching him do this on our old black and white television”.  It was all over the news in Los Angeles.

His daughter continued helping Dr.Ju with his practice on-and-off until age 14 (this was around 1978, when Gim was about 61 years-old).  At that time, Dr. Ju’s local practice had really slowed down.  He was traveling more than he was working at home.  He was invited to many places…particularly Mexico to perform acupuncture, and he had relationships with high officials and wealthy people there. He often stayed in Mexico for weeks at a time.

Dr. Ju died in Hong Kong in 1987, when he was 70 years old.

Acknowledgements

The author would like to thank Ms. Mamie Ju providing her father’s stories and reviewing the draft.

Reference

Fan AY. The earliest acupuncture school of the United States incubated in a Tai Chi Center in Los Angeles. J Integr Med 2014. J Integr Med. 2014 Nov;12(6):524-8.

Fan AY. The legendary life of Dr. Gim Shek Ju, the founding father of the education of acupuncture and Chinese medicine in the United States. J Integr Med. 2016 May;14(3):159-64. doi: 10.1016/S2095-4964(16)60260-1.

 

 

Read Full Post »

来源:新华社作者:杨士龙 吴小军责任编辑:柳晨

新华社纽约1月18日电(新华社记者杨士龙 吴小军)如果没有碰到“针灸医师”魏辉,美国纽约芭蕾舞学校新生妮可的芭蕾梦可能早就碎了。

妮可家住佛罗里达州西棕榈滩,去年年初参加佛州一次芭蕾舞比赛前韧带拉伤,当地医生建议去医院接受手术治疗,但那样会错过比赛。看到孩子的医疗保险可支付大部分针灸治疗费用,母亲雅西卡抱着试试看的心情,带女儿去了魏辉的针灸诊所。没想到只扎了两次针,辅以艾灸治疗,小姑娘就得以顺利参赛并获奖。后来,妮可又去魏辉那儿巩固治疗了6次。

去年9月,妮可到纽约上学前,特地与母亲一起去跟魏辉道谢并告别。雅西卡当天在自己脸谱账户上贴出了女儿与魏辉的合影,并配文说,魏辉是她们“最喜爱的针灸医师”,称赞她“用爱心和耐心让女儿免除了对针灸和拔罐的恐惧感”,成功解除了孩子的病痛。

从不熟悉到逐渐认可,甚至依赖,雅西卡母女对针灸乃至中医的认识过程,是美国社会日渐接受和认可中医的一个缩影。

“中医正在被越来越多的美国人认可。”1999年,魏辉从北京中医药大学毕业后移民美国,目前是全美中医药学会常务副会长。她在接受新华社记者电话采访时说:“三四年前,来我这里的病人,用保险支付针灸费的只有5%,现在这个数字超过了30%。”

她介绍说,1997年5月,美国国家卫生研究院(NIH)召开了针灸共识会议,决定承认中国针灸并正式应用于患者的临床治疗,这标志着美国在联邦层面正式认可了针灸。

美国50个州中,已有46个州及华盛顿特区通过了针灸立法,各州立法有所不同,但反映出地方政府对针灸这一健康产业的重视。资料显示,目前全美有执照的针灸师有4万左右,每年接受针灸等“整合治疗”的人口约3800万,已形成一个产值数十亿美元的重要产业。

“以前谈针灸和中医,这边人习惯称‘替代疗法’,现在称‘整合医疗’,明确了它是社会健保机制的一部分。”大纽约中医针灸学会副会长陈德成完全赞成魏辉的看法。身为南京中医药大学针灸专业博士的陈德成介绍说,针灸已通过立法的各州被大多数商业保险公司定点、定向、定额为医疗保险项目。

美国政府对“非正规传统医学”(相对于西医)研究工作的支持力度也在逐年加大。NIH成立的国家补充替代医学研究中心,每年经费高达1亿多美元,主要任务是研究各种补充替代医学和疗法,其中对针灸和中药的研究已有几十个项目,太极拳、气功和推拿等也在研究之列。

魏辉和陈德成均表示,中医针灸之所以逐渐从健保产业的边缘走向中心,是与中医“治未病”的理念以及独特显著疗效分不开。更现实的是,相对于西医,很多种病的中医治疗费用相对较低,风险小,候诊时间短。

“比如说,一些膝盖疼的病人,医院都建议手术替换,费用高不说,人工关节只管10多年,之后怎么办呢?”陈德成说。“我的不少病人都很感激地说,是我帮他们远离了手术台。”

然而,在“西医是正统”的美国,中医真正被全面认可还是远景。针灸、推拿、艾灸等与中医药被区别对待,即便是已被普遍接受的针灸业,也面临被瓜分蚕食和改头换面的危险。

陈德成说,一些西医根本未接受任何针灸培训,就宣称自己掌握了针灸技能,以抢夺针灸市场,当治疗效果不佳时,他们不认为自己技术不精,而是埋怨针灸无效,严重影响了针灸在公众中的良好形象。

此外,大多数针灸医生活跃在临床前线,针灸科研是一个弱项,而西医作为“标准的制定者和判断者”,常用循证医学的标准来衡量中医针灸。“中医针灸今后应加强科研,还要申请专利保护自己权益,”魏辉说。

陈德成指出,中医针灸界应该形成合力,推动立法和参与规则制定来最大限度地保护自身权益。例如,在美国中医校友联合会基础上建立起来的全美中医药学会为提升中医学术水平,保护行业利益,扩大中医针灸的影响发挥了重要作用。

Read Full Post »

2018年04月07日05:47  来源:人民网-人民日报海外版 http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:http://world.people.com.cn/n1/2018/0407/c1002-29909910.html

莎伦又一次躺在熟悉的床位上,针灸师樊蓥轻、稳、准地在她肩部和颈部的重要穴位扎上了细细的针。莎伦的耳边响起了柔和温馨的轻音乐,她慢慢闭上眼,呼吸均匀,心情平和。

樊蓥是美国弗吉尼亚州与华盛顿特区持照针灸师,他的诊所——美京中医院位于弗吉尼亚州梅克林小镇。300平方米左右的诊所内共有15个床位。身为一名职业律师的莎伦·希普勒已经忘了这是她第多少次来到诊所接受治疗。

喜欢运动的莎伦今年60岁,她与针灸的缘分始于3年前。当时她的腿部得了肌腱炎,西医告诉她最快也要几个月才能恢复。在朋友的推荐下,她来到樊蓥的诊所。樊蓥仔细查看了腿伤后告诉她:“两周来做一次治疗,3次后就能康复。”

西医的数个月康复和针灸的3次就好,这差距大得让莎伦有些不敢相信。面对莎伦的怀疑,樊蓥只是笑笑说,咱们试试看吧。

出乎莎伦意料,一个疗程下来,肌腱炎竟奇迹般康复,她矫健而轻盈的身姿很快又重现跑道。

“太神奇了!”她在接受新华记者采访时禁不住多次感叹。此后,莎伦对中医从信赖到依赖,身体稍有不适,首先想到的就是看中医。目前,莎伦所参加的医疗保险覆盖针灸治疗,可报销80%。

律师工作压力大,导致莎伦睡眠不好。多次针灸后,她感觉睡眠明显改善;每次莎伦感觉有感冒前兆,或者美国将有流感,她就赶紧来找樊蓥。莎伦相信,针灸疗法帮她提高了免疫力。最近她肩部受伤,又是针灸让她免受了手术折磨。

如今,莎伦不仅是针灸的粉丝,更成了针灸的传播者。亲朋好友生病了,她会向大家推荐中医。85岁的老母亲经常背疼,她力劝母亲尝试针灸疗法。

莎伦对中西医治疗差别感触很深。“樊蓥和他的助手对我十分耐心、细致,我感到很放松,恢复得也快。如果是去看西医,幸运的话,医生会给我10分钟,然后就开药,或安排更多检查。看到我肩痛或脚痛,西医会给我打止痛针。我可不喜欢打针和手术。所以,我会来针灸诊所。我虽不知道针灸原理,但我知道它有效。我坚信今后会有越来越多的人看中医。”

众所周知,阿片类止痛药包括杜冷丁、吗啡等,镇痛作用强大,但有极强成瘾性,这迫使人们接受非药物疗法。在各种非药物疗法中,针灸以有效和廉价脱颖而出。中国数十年来持续进行的中医机理研究形成大量成果,此时成为有力佐证。美国国家科学、工程和医学学院2007年7月发布题为《疼痛管理与阿片类药物流行》的报告指出,近几十年来针灸止痛已成为普遍做法,包括针灸在内的一些非药物干预手段是止痛的有力工具。

不久前,作为全美中医药学会(ATCMA)副会长的樊蓥,参加了在美国国会举办的针灸推介会,向议员推荐和介绍针灸在止痛与治疗药物成瘾方面的作用。现场气氛热烈,40多人还尝试了耳针。

(据新华社电 记者郭一娜 林小春 胡友松)

Read Full Post »

2017-12-28 13:37:38 来源: 新华网

新华社华盛顿12月27日电(记者林小春)美国针灸行业现在终于有了第一批确切的统计数字:2015年初,美国有执照的针灸师人数超过3.4万,另外还有62所针灸与中医院校以及10个博士生培养点。

在美国,中医师的法定名称是“针灸师”。由于历史与政治、文化等原因,中医师在美国各州法律中有着不同的名称,如东方医学医师和东亚医学医师,但大多数州称为“执照针灸师”。他们都以针灸为业,部分兼顾中药及推拿等。

全美中医药学会副会长樊蓥博士与弗吉尼亚州针灸协会萨拉·法格特博士近日在《结合医学学报》杂志网络版上发表了一篇统计报告,他们通过给各州主管针灸执照的部门电话咨询并核对各州官网公布的针灸师名录,确定2015年初美国50个州与华盛顿特区加上海外领地共有34481名有执照的针灸师。

统计结果还表明,美国有执照的针灸师超过一半集中在三个州,分别是加利福尼亚(32.39%)、纽约(11.89%)和佛罗里达(7.06%)。华人只占有执照的针灸师比较小的一部分,多数是白人和其他族裔。

樊蓥告诉新华社记者,这是美国针灸业界第一次正式发布此类行业信息,审稿过程大约2年,经10多位专家评审才得以发表。先前也曾有人做过类似统计,但没有在学术杂志上发表。

樊蓥指出,与2004年的2.2万多人和2009年的近2.8万人相比,2015年的数字增长52.09%和23.30%,每年平均增长数约为1266人。由此推算,2018年初,美国有执照的针灸师人数将达到3.8万人。

另外,2015年初,美国有44个州及华盛顿特区为针灸或东方医学专门立法,目前则是47个州和特区有了专门立法。2015年初,有62所美国教育部认可的针灸或东方医学硕士生培养院校、10个博士生培养点。现在,美国教育部门认可的中医类院校降到了56所,都是私立的小型学校。

Read Full Post »

国医节的回顾与前瞻

(作者:陳明 三藩市 )http://singtaousa.com/031811/sq01.php

三月十七日,是中國第八十二屆國醫節。八十二年前的一九二九年,任上海醫院醫務長的醫生余雲岫,早年留學日本,受日本明治維新取締漢醫的影響,主張「廢醫存藥」,他向南京國民政府提出《廢止舊醫以掃除醫事律法之障礙案》。此案經南京國民政府衛生部召開的第一屆中央衛生委員會之議通過,準備正式施行。中醫面臨生死存亡的鬥爭。兵書有云:「置於死地而後生」。國民政府通過廢止中醫法案,把中醫醫務人員推向背水之戰,全國中醫界空前團結,群起反對。結果取得了勝利,並定每年三月十七日為「國醫節」。

中醫是中華民族幾千年來生產生活實踐和與疾病鬥爭逐步形成並不斷豐富發展起來的醫學科學,為中華民族的繁衍昌盛作出了重要貢獻,對世界文明進步也產生了積極的影響。一百多年前隨著華人移民到美國,也把中醫中藥帶到美國。據筆者所知,第一位來美國的中醫師就是黎普泰,他是廣東順德人,一八五四年四月,黎普泰在《金山日新錄》(The Golden Hills’ News)刊登中醫館廣告。以此算起,中醫中藥傳入美國三藩市已有一百六十年。

黎普泰的中醫館最初設在華埠華盛頓街,後遷至都板街夾企李街的錦生堂樓上。黎普泰以中藥治療奇難雜症,名揚遐邇。由於求醫甚眾,他一個人難以應付,便叫他的外甥譚富園來幫忙。  譚富園就讀於北京太醫院,是當時全國唯一的最高中醫學府。一八九零年譚來三藩市,襄助普泰醫館,聲名鵲起。三年後因黎普泰病逝,譚的父親譚子山在廣州行醫,命他回去幫忙,譚富園便回到廣州。

一八九四年,富園攜妻子及三子一女來加州,在南加州的列連埠(Redlands)創立富園醫局(Foo and Wing Herb Co.)。由於富園醫術精湛,妙手回春,聲譽日隆,引起西人醫師的妒忌,在報上攻擊中醫中藥不科學。譚富園把自己的醫案交給記者發表,證明中醫的奧妙,其功效一點也不遜於西醫,甚至有些西醫無法治療的奇難雜症,中醫能夠對症下藥,藥到病除。這場關於中醫是不是科學的筆戰,由於富園既有理論,又有治癒病例醫案佐證,終於取得了最後勝利,為弘揚中醫中藥作出了貢獻。

但是,歧視中醫中藥,並不因譚富園的貢獻而結束。一八九九年創辦金山華人仁濟醫院,只設西醫部,沒有中醫部,當時旅美華人有病多喜歡中醫診治,仁濟與華僑需求有矛盾,一年後停辦。

一九零零年,華人在三藩市創辦東華醫局,一九二五年改為東華醫院,始設立中醫門診。可是,中醫中藥立法的道路,在美國還是十分漫長的。在美國的五十個州中,只有佔人口五十萬的內華達州,於一九七三年四月二十日通過第448號法案,第一次為中醫中藥立法,在法律面前承認中醫中藥的合法地位。而作為中醫中藥的兩大重鎮的加州和紐約州,至今仍沒有取得合法地位。目前中醫中藥唯一生存空間,就是在美國把中藥當作「保健品」經營。「中藥」的經營不是某個人某個組團的專利,藥材舖有商業牌照,就可開舖立市,有合法地位。「坐堂醫」開出保健菜單(處方),自然是合法的。中醫師在美國名不正言不順,美國學界稱中醫中藥為「替代醫學」。美國醫學會的標誌是「蛇」,奧巴馬醫改法案只有「蛇」,而不見有中醫中藥的「龍」。美國只在商業上承認中藥作為保健商品的合法地位,而沒有作為醫療衛生的專業領域承認中醫中藥的合法地位,豈非咄咄怪事。

針灸是中醫的一個科目,而中醫才是主體,目前加州州政府只承認針灸合法,而不承認中醫中藥合法,確是本末倒置,令人費解。

在迎接第八十二屆國醫節的時候,筆者倡議全美國的中醫中藥醫務人員,不分甚麼政治觀點,不論甚麼宗教信仰,大家團結起來,為爭取中醫中藥的立法而鬥爭。在這裡,筆者提出四點建議:

第一,吸取內華達州中醫中藥立法的經驗,以針灸立法為突破口,繼承和發展前輩爭取中醫中藥立法精神。

第二,中醫中藥全體醫務人員團結起來,不要「岐黃相輕」,而要「岐黃相親」。不要「同行如敵國」,要「同行如一國」。兩岸關係不是「一中原則」嗎?我們中醫中藥醫務人員也要樹立「一中原則」,就是爭取中醫中藥立法的原則,一切言行都要以有利於中醫立法為原則。

第三,贊同加州執照針灸醫師公會會長沈華舒的意見「實行學院教育與師徒教育相結合」。中醫傳統教育,是先有師徒教育,後來才發展為學院教育。現在卻出現只重視中醫高等教育,而輕視名中醫的授徒教育。這兩者各有優點,學院重視系統教育,師徒則重視專長教育。前者注重理論修養,後者注重臨床經驗。把二者結合起來,取長補短,培養出一批既有高深的中醫基礎理論素養又有豐富臨床診療技術水平的醫務人員,才能投入美國主流社會,征服美國社會民眾,進而為中醫中藥立法創造充分條件。

第四,把中醫中藥提高到哲學思想和世界觀來認識。過去一些著名中醫稱為「儒醫」,就是他有具有儒家思想的根底。也有一些道觀的道士為名中醫,就是他們具有道家養生的根底。可見,沒有真正認識和領會儒家和道家的哲學思想和世界觀,也就不可能真正瞭解和領會中醫中藥的真諦。中醫中藥是姓「中」,即使你已入了美國籍,但只要你是中醫中藥的醫務人員,你就永遠改變不了姓「中」。中醫中藥是中華民族文化的瑰寶之一,只有維護民族的特色,才有利於中醫中藥的走向世界,而要做到這一點,其根源正是淵源於儒家和道家的思想。

近年來,加州華裔參政人士取得很大的成績,我們希望這些參政的華裔官員和議員,不要忘記支持你們走向政壇的華裔選民。你們最好的回報,就是利用你們力所能及的影響,爭取中醫中藥早日立法。

 

 

 

譚頴秀 – 註册針灸師 http://kaywin.ca/WellnessCentre/LingLanWellnessCentre.aspx

7725 Birchmount Road Unit 29/30, Markham, Ontario L3R 9X3
Phone: 647-282-3996            Email: LingLan333@hotmail.com

譚氏曾祖父譚富園公受其父親中醫譚子山之薰陶, 就讀於北京太醫院學習中醫,曾在清朝末年任太醫,後跟隨舅父中醫師黎普泰(第一位到美國之中醫師),到美國三藩市行醫,再與康有為弟子在南加州的列連埠(Redlands)創立富園醫局。由於富園公醫術精湛,妙手回春,引起西人醫師的妒忌,在報上攻擊中醫中藥不科學化。富園公把自己之醫案交給記者發表,證明中醫之奧妙,其功效一點也不遜於西醫,甚至有些西醫無法治療之奇難雜症,中醫也能夠對症下藥,藥到病除。這場關於中醫是不是科學化之筆戰,由於富園公既有理論,又有治癒病例醫案佐證,終於取得了最後之勝利,為弘揚中醫中藥作出了貢獻。其四子譚少富繼承衣砵在加州行醫,退休後回港飬老。那時譚氏年幼未能跟隨叔公學習中醫,但他留下不少清代名醫陳修園之書籍及治療札記,令譚氏獲益良多。

譚氏從小移民來加,初習太極,後醉心於氣功,不斷研習各派氣功如少林禪功、道家氣功及治療氣功(五雷神針和日本靈氣)等。因先祖均是中醫,耳濡目染,便到加拿大中醫藥學院(北京首都醫科大學分校)修讀中醫針灸,畢業後跟隨多倫多中醫針灸臨床學院創始人沈清瑞中醫師學習運用多種臨床針灸療法。譚氏所用之治療針法,不限於傳統針法。她辨証論治,根據不同患者之病患,施以不同療法,例如:薄氏腹針、董氏奇穴、王氏刺血及黃氏耳穴等。譚氏精於氣功,扎針時運用五雷神針指法將氣輸入患者體內,同時配合氣功、靈氣或水晶療法等,推動患者體內之內氣,喚醒患者體內沉睡的臟器起來工作。本着醫者父母心,用心與患者共同對抗病魔,達到理想療效。

Read Full Post »

Vous êtes ici > Formations médicales en acupuncture > Histoire de l’acupuncture et de la MTC : l’Occident > Figures de la médecine chinoise et de l’acupuncture en occident > Foo Yuen


Foo Yuen

Tom Foo Yuen (1855-?).

Tom Foo Yuen was born near Canton, China, in 1855, and was educated at the Imperial Medical College at Peking. When he was only a little boy he made a trip to San Francisco with his father, and resided there for a short time. His father was a wealthy physician the late Dr. T. Gee Son and was also engaged in mercantile ventures as the president of a great mercantile association. In a general way he superintended the legal and business affairs of his company, and was on business of this sort when he brought his little son to America. Tom Foo Yuen's mother was a sister of the celebrated Chinese physician, Dr. Li Po Tai. About thirty years ago Dr. T. Gee Son lived in San Francisco for several years as a partner of Li Po Tai. Together they cured the diseases of many Americans, and testimonials of these cures were printed in the newspapers of the period. But his family preferred the climate of Canton to that of San Francisco, and they therefore returned to Canton, where T. Gee Son again opened a hospital that he had formerly conducted with great success. Returning to China with his father, Tom Foo Yuen was educated as a physician with all the care and rigorous discipline usual in China, where successive generations are trained for this profession from the commencement of school days. He was finally graduated, with high honors, from the Imperial Medical College at Peking. In 189u he came to San Francisco and was the first Oriental physician of his rank to visit America with the intention of making a permanent home here. He became an associate with Li Po Tai, who was then getting old and unable to carry on all of his large business. He remained in San Francisco until 1893 and, during that time acquired an enviable reputation as a physician, both among the Chinese residents of Sari Francisco and among many white patrons. (Source : The science of oriental medicine, diet and Hygiene. Los Angeles 1902).<br /><br />

Tom Foo Yuen was born near Canton, China, in 1855, and was educated at the Imperial Medical College at Peking. When he was only a little boy he made a trip to San Francisco with his father, and resided there for a short time. His father was a wealthy physician the late Dr. T. Gee Son and was also engaged in mercantile ventures as the president of a great mercantile association. In a general way he superintended the legal and business affairs of his company, and was on business of this sort when he brought his little son to America. Tom Foo Yuen’s mother was a sister of the celebrated Chinese physician, Dr. Li Po Tai. About thirty years ago Dr. T. Gee Son lived in San Francisco for several years as a partner of Li Po Tai. Together they cured the diseases of many Americans, and testimonials of these cures were printed in the newspapers of the period. But his family preferred the climate of Canton to that of San Francisco, and they therefore returned to Canton, where T. Gee Son again opened a hospital that he had formerly conducted with great success. Returning to China with his father, Tom Foo Yuen was educated as a physician with all the care and rigorous discipline usual in China, where successive generations are trained for this profession from the commencement of school days. He was finally graduated, with high honors, from the Imperial Medical College at Peking. In 189u he came to San Francisco and was the first Oriental physician of his rank to visit America with the intention of making a permanent home here. He became an associate with Li Po Tai, who was then getting old and unable to carry on all of his large business. He remained in San Francisco until 1893 and, during that time acquired an enviable reputation as a physician, both among the Chinese residents of San Francisco and among many white patrons. (Source : The science of oriental medicine, diet and Hygiene. Los Angeles 1902).

The science of oriental medicine, diet and Hygiene. Foo & Wing Herb Company. Los Angeles 1902.

Tom Foo Yuen was born near Canton, China, in 1855, and was educated at the Imperial Medical College at Peking. When he was only a little boy he made a trip to San Francisco with his father, and resided there for a short time. His father was a wealthy physician the late Dr. T. Gee Son and was also engaged in mercantile ventures as the president of a great mercantile association. In a general way he superintended the legal and business affairs of his company, and was on business of this sort when he brought his little son to America. Tom Foo Yuen's mother was a sister of the celebrated Chinese physician, Dr. Li Po Tai. About thirty years ago Dr. T. Gee Son lived in San Francisco for several years as a partner of Li Po Tai. Together they cured the diseases of many Americans, and testimonials of these cures were printed in the newspapers of the period. But his family preferred the climate of Canton to that of San Francisco, and they therefore returned to Canton, where T. Gee Son again opened a hospital that he had formerly conducted with great success. Returning to China with his father, Tom Foo Yuen was educated as a physician with all the care and rigorous discipline usual in China, where successive generations are trained for this profession from the commencement of school days. He was finally graduated, with high honors, from the Imperial Medical College at Peking. In 189u he came to San Francisco and was the first Oriental physician of his rank to visit America with the intention of making a permanent home here. He became an associate with Li Po Tai, who was then getting old and unable to carry on all of his large business. He remained in San Francisco until 1893 and, during that time acquired an enviable reputation as a physician, both among the Chinese residents of Sari Francisco and among many white patrons. (Source : The science of oriental medicine, diet and Hygiene. Los Angeles 1902).<br /><br />

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »