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Great news! This month our article”Acupuncture’s Role in Solving the Opioid Epidemic: Evidence, Cost-Effectiveness, and Care Availability for Acupuncture as a Primary, Non-Pharmacologic Method for Pain Relief and Management–White Paper 2017″ 1 (Arthur Yin Fan is the first author, and Dr.David Miller is the correspondence author, our colleague Sarah Faggert also a co-author-there are 14 authors across the United States) has been selected as one of ten articles for the November 2017 Elsevier Atlas Awards Nominations.

As is stated on the Elsevier Atlas Awards homepage: “Each month the Atlas Advisory Board are sent a selection of 10 articles to choose their winning Atlas article. The articles are shortlisted by Elsevier from across journal portfolios based on their potential social impact. We are delighted to present the entire monthly shortlist and congratulate the authors of the nominated articles.” While the voting is still in progress, we are still very excited to even be nominated. This marks the first time that an acupuncture article has been nominated for the Elsevier Atlas Award.You may click on the following link to take you the Elsevier Atlas Nominations page: https://www.elsevier.com/connect/atlas/nominations.

We will let you know should our article win!

Each month the Atlas Advisory Board are sent a selection of 10 articles to choose their winning Atlas article.
ELSEVIER.COM
Reference:
1. Fan AY, Miller DW, Bolash B, Bauer M, McDonald J, Faggert S, He H, Li YM, Matecki A, Camardella L, Koppelman MH, Stone JA, Meade L, Pang J. Acupuncture’s Role in Solving the Opioid Epidemic: Evidence, Cost-Effectiveness, and Care Availability for Acupuncture as a Primary, Non-Pharmacologic Method for Pain Relief and Management—White Paper 2017. J Integr Med. 2017; 15(6): 411–425.
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http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2017-09/27/c_136643493.htm

WASHINGTON, Sept. 26 (Xinhua) — In the wake of an opioid epidemic, acupuncturists in the United States issued a white paper on Tuesday, recommending acupuncture as a primary non-pharmacologic method for pain relief and management.

“The United States is facing a national opioid epidemic, and medical systems are in need of non-pharmacologic strategies that can be employed to decrease the public’s opioid dependence,” said the 21-page white paper.

Official figures showed that opioid overdoses kill 91 Americans every single day and more than half of those deaths involve prescription opioids.

Titled “Acupuncture’s Role in Solving the Opioid Epidemic,” the white paper said “acupuncture has emerged as a powerful, evidence-based, safe, cost-effective, and available treatment modality suitable to meeting this need.”

Organizations that contributed to this paper included the American Society of Acupuncturists, the American Alliance for Professional Acupuncture Safety, the Acupuncture Now Foundation, the American Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Association, and the American TCM Society and National Federation of TCM Organizations.

The white paper said acupuncture has been shown to be effective for treating various types of pain, with the strongest evidence emerging for back pain, neck pain, shoulder pain, chronic headache, and osteoarthritis.

It said mechanisms of action for acupuncture have been extensively researched, which found the ancient Chinese practice increase the production and release of endogenous opioids in animals and humans.

“Acupuncture should be recommended as a first line treatment for pain before opiates are prescribed, and may reduce opioid use,” it wrote.

“Further, acupuncture’s cost-effectiveness could dramatically decrease health care expenditures, both from the standpoint of treating acute pain and through avoiding the development of opioid addiction that requires costly care, destroys quality of life, and can lead to fatal overdose.”

The white paper came about a week after the U.S. National Association of Attorneys General sent a letter to America’s Health Insurance Plans, asking its insurance company members to review their payment and coverage policies in order to promote alternatives to opioids such as acupuncture.

Acupuncture is a healing process performed by a specialized doctor having in-depth knowledge of pulse diagnosis. The growing prevalence of chronic diseases, secondary lifestyle, gynecological disorders, obesity, and alcohol dependency have led to complications such as insomnia, body pain, and emotional disorders which drive the growth of the global acupuncture market. According to a study published in the Drug and Alcohol Dependence Journal in 2017, more than 100 million adults are living with chronic pain in the Americas. Additionally, factors such as advancements in acupuncture therapy and the growing geriatric population are also promoting the growth of the acupuncture market globally. Moreover, the increasing demand for complementary and alternative medicines and growing funding activities for acupuncture are likely to support the growth of the market during the assessment period.

The global acupuncture market is expected to reach to a market value of USD 55,323.8 million by 2023 from USD 24,551.6 million in 2017 and is expected to register a CAGR of 14.50% during the forecast period from 2018 to 2023. In 2017, the market was led by Europe with a 32.7% share, followed by Asia-Pacific and the Americas with shares of 29.4% and 25.3%, respectively.  The market growth of the European region is attributed to the rising acceptance of acupuncture therapy.

The global acupuncture market has been segmented based on product and service, application, end user, and region.

The global acupuncture market, by product and service, has been segmented into services and products.

The global acupuncture market, by application, has been segmented into pain syndrome illness, gynecological disorders, psychological illness, and others.

By end user, the global acupuncture market has been segmented into wellness centers, hospitals and specialty clinics, and research and academic institutes.

Access this Report: https://www.reportocean.com/industry-verticals/sample-request.php?report_id=19280

Key Players

Seirin Corporation, Kanson, Zepter International, Cymedics GmbH & Co. KG, schwa-medico GmbH, MKW Lasersystem GmbH, Wuxi Jiajian Medical Instruments Co., Ltd, 3B Scientific GmbH, Asia-med GmbH, Qingdao Great Fortune Co., Ltd, and AcuMedic Ltd.

Study Objectives

  • To provide a comprehensive analysis of the acupuncture industry and its sub-segments in the global market, thereby providing a detailed structure of the industry
  • To provide detailed insights into factors driving and restraining the growth of the global acupuncture market
  • To estimate the market size of acupuncture from 2015 to 2023 for different regions. Wherein, 2015 to 2016 would be the historic period, 2017 shall be the base year, and 2018 to 2023 will be the forecast period for the study
  • To analyze the global acupuncture market, on the basis of four main geographies, namely, the Americas, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and the Middle East and Africa
  • To compare the products with respect to various players in the market
  • To provide country-wise market value analysis for various segments of the acupuncture market
  • To provide strategic profiling of key companies (manufacturers and distributors) present across the globe, and comprehensively analyze their competitiveness/competitive landscape in this market
  • To provide distribution chain analysis/value chain for the acupuncture market

Target Audience

  • Medical Device Manufacturers
  • Medical Device Suppliers and Distributors
  • Government Research Institutes
  • Academic Institutes and Universities

Key Findings

  • The global acupuncture market is expected to reach USD 55,323.8 million by 2023 from USD 24,551.6 million in 2017 and is expected to register a CAGR of 14.50% during the forecast period from 2018 to 2023
  • On the basis of product and service, the services segment accounted for the largest market share and is projected to register a CAGR of 14.26% in 2023
  • Based on application, the pain syndrome illness segment accounted for the largest market share and is anticipated to register a CAGR of 14.04% by the year 2023
  • Based on end user, the wellness center segment held the largest market share of 44.6% in 2017 and is projected to register a CAGR of 14.32% during the forecast period
  • Europe is expected to hold the largest share of the global acupuncture market at a CAGR of 13.53% in 2023
  • The Americas is the fastest growing market, which is expected to register a CAGR of 14.94% by 2023

Our new article has been just published. https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1YjvU7STV7irBO

Citation: Fan AY, Ouyang H, Qian X, Wei H, Wang DD, He D, Tian H, Gong C, Matecki A,Alemi SF. Discussions on real-world acupuncture treatments for chronic low-back pain in older adults.J Integr Med.2019; 17(2): 71–76.

 

My academic bibliography in National Library of Medicine in this URL:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/bibliography/arthur%20yin.fan.1/bibliography/public/

via What is the Best Chinese Medicine School in China in 2018 (Scimago Ranking) 中国最好的中医药大学SCIMAGO2018排名

https://www.scimagoir.com/rankings.php?sector=Higher%20educ.&country=CHN

In 2018, Scimago ranked 251 (some schools may in the same rank number) best Universities in China based on academic publications (in English?).

There were 15 Chinese Medicine Schools were in that list.

  1. Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (rank no.104 in best 251 Universities in China); 上海中医药大学
  2. Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (rank no.127); 南京中医药大学
  3. Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (rank no.133); 成都中医药大学
  4. Zhejiang Chinese Medical University (rank no.140); 浙江中医药大学
  5. Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (rank no.159); 天津中医药大学
  6. Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (rank no.162);福建中医药大学
  7. Heilongjiang University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (rank no. 163); 黑龙江中医药大学
  8. Beijing University of Chinese Medicine (rank no.172); 北京中医药大学
  9. Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (rank no.176); 广州中医药大学
  10. Henan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (rank no. 183); 河南中医药大学
  11. Jaingxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (rank no.200); 江西中医药大学
  12. Anhui University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (rank no.200); 安徽中医药大学
  13. Shangdong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (rank no.204); 山东中医药大学
  14. Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (rank no.205); 辽宁中医药大学
  15. Hunan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (rank no. 211); 湖南中医药大学

Info from: https://www.daocloud.com/acupuncture/cost

As you can imagine, the cost of acupuncture varies from city to city and from one acupuncturist to the next. In this article, we’ll explore the kinds of costs you can expect when you seek treatment, the types of discounts you may be eligible for, how to find low-cost acupuncture using community clinics, and acupuncture costs in some of the major cities.

If you’re looking to use insurance, we’ll reveal which insurance companies will pay for acupuncture treatment, And if you’re looking for a specific treatment for weight loss, back pain, infertility, or migraines, we’ll also give you an idea of what you can expect to pay for those treatments.

Contents

  1. How Much Does Acupuncture Cost?
  2. Typical Costs
  3. Discounts
  4. Total cost
  5. How to find low cost acupuncture (please consider the quality before consider low cost)
  6.  Which insurance companies cover acupuncture?
  7.  Acupuncture Cost by City
  8.  Cost by treatment type
  9.  For infertility
  10.  For Weight Loss
  11.  For Back Pain
  12.  For Migraines
  13.  Additional costs to consider
  14.  Tips for shopping for acupuncture
  15.  Frequently Asked Questions
  16.  Does medicare cover acupuncture?
  17.  Does medicaid cover acupuncture?
  18.  Do Medicare supplemental insurance plans cover acupuncture?
  19.  Will my insurance cover acupuncture?

Typical Costs

Fees for your first session of acupuncture may include an initial consultation, medical exam, and acupuncture treatment. This will cost between $120 to $240. Additional visits may cost $75 to $160.

Discounts

Many acupuncturists offer a discount when you purchase multiple treatments. So for example, if you were to purchase one session at $150 or six sessions at $600, bringing the price down to $100 per session.

Other popular discounts are:

  • Student discounts
  • Senior discounts
  • Child discounts

Ask your acupuncturist if they offer any of these discounts to get a better price on your treatments. For example, in Atlanta, an acupuncture treatment will cost $120, but a student discount brings it to $85, and for a child, it’s only $65.

Total cost

According to consumer reports , people spent more than $200 out of pocket over the course of their full treatment for acupuncture and almost one in four spent $500 or more.

How to find low cost acupuncture

Non-profit community acupuncture clinics are gaining popularity. These clinics, like Phoenix Community Acupuncture , offer low cost acupuncture on a sliding scale, $17-$35. Look for a community acupuncture clinic in your area to find low cost acupuncture.

Which insurance companies cover acupuncture?

The following insurance companies may cover your acupuncture, depending on your plan. Be sure to check with your insurance provider to verify coverage before seeking treatment. Your acupuncturist may also be able to assist you.

  • Aetna
  • Blue Cross/Blue Shield
  • Cigna
  • Humana
  • Johns Hopkins EHP
  • Kennedy Krieger’s Core Source
  • Landmark
  • Optum
  • United Health Care

Acupuncture Cost by City

Methodology

These prices estimate the costs you may expect to pay for acupuncture without insurance. To determine these prices, we sampled acupuncturists listed in the Google business directory in each area.

Cost by City

City Acupuncture Session Cost
Atlanta $80
Austin $85
Baltimore $90
Boston $100
Charlotte $80
Chicago $95
Cincinnati $100
Cleveland $85
Columbus $75
Dallas $85
Denver $125
Houston $160
Indianapolis $95
Kansas City $75
Las Vegas $70
Los Angeles $120
Louisville $85
Memphis $75
Miami $120
Milwaukee $90
Minneapolis $120
Nashville $100
New Orleans $85
New York $300
Oklahoma City $75
Philadelphia $95
Phoenix $75
Portland $150
Raleigh $75
Richmond $90
Salt Lake City $75
San Diego $108
San Francisco $150
San Jose $85
Seattle $135
St Louis $60
Tampa $125
Washington DC $160

Cost by treatment type

For infertility

If you suffer from infertility, plan to pay a lot of money to increase your chances of getting pregnant. A typical acupuncture program for fertility might last three to six months, with treatments every week. Plan for a major portion of your expenses upfront with various diagnostic tests running from $160 to $325, which may include:

  • Male hormone panel
  • Female hormone panel
  • Estrogen ratio test
  • Adrenal salivary index
  • Salivary food sensitivity panel

Sample infertility costs

Initial Visit $150

Female hormone panel $325

Estrogen ratio test $200

Herbs ($150 monthly) $900

Weekly acupuncture for 6 months $1,680

___________________________________________________________________

Total Cost $3,255

For Weight Loss

If you need to lose some weight, acupuncture could help. Weekly acupuncture was shown to improve weight loss in this study. If you figure three months of acupuncture to accompany your exercise regime, you’d spend $840 or more depending on the per session cost.

For Back Pain

If you consider testimonial and anecdotal evidence, some people have used acupuncture to become free from pain in has few as 24 sessions. If you figure on a cost per session of $70 to $150, that amounts to $1,680 to $3,600.

However, some research suggests the effects of acupuncture on pain are temporary. In this case, you might need weekly acupuncture on an ongoing basis, resulting in a cost of $280 to $600 monthly for your back pain.

For Migraines

The same situation is true from migraines as back pain. Considering that you may need ongoing acupuncture treatment to relieve the pain associated with you migraines and keep them at bay, you may need to plan on spending anywhere from $280 to $1200 for weekly or bi-weekly acupuncture treatment.

Additional costs to consider

Here are some additional costs you may need to consider before purchasing an acupuncture treatment.

  • Herbs and supplements. Many acupuncture clinics will recommend patients take Chinese herbs or other supplements as part of their treatment program. These will always cost additional money above and beyond your acupuncture treatment, ranging from $30 to $150 monthly.
  • Tui Na. Your treatment may begin with an optional Tui Na session. This is similar to massage, but with a therapeutic emphasis, rather than relaxation. You may be charged extra for Tui Na.
  • Gratuity. With most bodywork, you may be expected to leave a tip for your practitioner; somewhere between 10-20%. Some clinics encourage gratuity while others discourage it.

Tips for shopping for acupuncture

  1. Ask your friends for a recommendation.
  2. Research online.
  3. Read online reviews.
  4. Understand the practitioners training and specializations.
  5. Call and ask for an introductory session. (Don’t forget to ask about what insurance they take)
  6. Go to your first appointment and evaluate the doctor and the office.
  7. Make a decision to return or keep looking for an acupuncturist you like.

Frequently Asked Questions

Does medicare cover acupuncture?

No. Medicare does not cover acupuncture.

Does medicaid cover acupuncture?

No. Medicaid does not cover acupuncture

Do Medicare supplemental insurance plans cover acupuncture?

Some Medicare supplemental insurance plans provide coverage for acupuncture treatment but most don’t offer coverage.

Will my insurance cover acupuncture?

While many insurance companies are beginning to cover acupuncture, most plans that do are higher cost plans. If you have had chronic pain for six months and the traditional forms of treatment, like drugs or physical therapy have been ineffective, there’s a higher chance your insurance will cover your acupuncture treatments.

Our clinical trial protocol has been published recently in Journal of Integrative Medicine, the PDF of whole article is available based on request.

Effectiveness of two different acupuncture strategies in patients with vulvodynia: Study protocol for a pilot pragmatic controlled trial.

Fan AY, Alemi SF, Zhu YH, Rahimi S, Wei H, Tian H, He D, Gong C, Yang G, He C, Ouyang H.  J Integr Med. 2018 Oct 10. pii: S2095-4964(18)30103-1. doi: 10.1016/j.joim.2018.10.004. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Vulvodynia, or vulvar pain, is a common condition in women; however, there are few evidence-based clinical trials evaluating nonpharmacological therapies for this condition. Acupuncture is one complementary and integrative medicine therapy used by some patients with vulvodynia. This study evaluates two different acupuncture strategies for the treatment of vulvodynia and aims to evaluate whether either of the acupuncture protocols reduces vulvar pain, pain duration or pain with intercourse. The study also examines how long the effect of acupuncture lasts in women with vulvodynia.

METHODS/DESIGN:

The study is designed as a randomized controlled trial, focused on two acupuncture protocols. Fifty-one patients who have had vulvodynia for more than 3 months will be recruited. Among them, 34 patients will be randomized into Groups 1a and 1b; those who are unwilling to receive acupuncture will be recruited into the standard care group (Group 2). Patients in Group 1a will have acupuncture focused on the points in the pudendal nerve distribution area, while patients in Group 1b will receive acupuncture focused on traditional (distal) meridian points. Patients in Group 2 will receive routine conventional treatments, such as using pain medications, local injections and physical therapies or other nonsurgical procedures. Acupuncture will last 45 min per session, once or twice a week for 6 weeks. The primary outcome measurement will be objective pain intensity, using the cotton swab test. The secondary outcome measurement will be subjective patient self-reported pain intensity, which will be conducted before cotton swab test. Pain intensities will be measured by an 11-point Numeric Pain Rating Scale. Pain duration and pain score during intercourse are recorded. Local muscle tension, tenderness and trigger points (Ashi points) are also recorded. All measurements will be recorded at baseline (before the treatment), at the end of each week during treatment and at the end of the 6 weeks. Follow-up will be done 6 weeks following the last treatment.

DISCUSSION:

Results of this trial will provide preliminary data on whether acupuncture provides better outcomes than nonacupuncture treatments, i.e., standard care, and whether acupuncture focused on the points in pudendal nerve distribution, near the pain area, has better results than traditional acupuncture focused on distal meridian points for vulvodynia.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT03481621. Register: March 29, 2018.