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Great news! This month our article”Acupuncture’s Role in Solving the Opioid Epidemic: Evidence, Cost-Effectiveness, and Care Availability for Acupuncture as a Primary, Non-Pharmacologic Method for Pain Relief and Management–White Paper 2017″ 1 (Arthur Yin Fan is the first author, and Dr.David Miller is the correspondence author, our colleague Sarah Faggert also a co-author-there are 14 authors across the United States) has been selected as one of ten articles for the November 2017 Elsevier Atlas Awards Nominations.

As is stated on the Elsevier Atlas Awards homepage: “Each month the Atlas Advisory Board are sent a selection of 10 articles to choose their winning Atlas article. The articles are shortlisted by Elsevier from across journal portfolios based on their potential social impact. We are delighted to present the entire monthly shortlist and congratulate the authors of the nominated articles.” While the voting is still in progress, we are still very excited to even be nominated. This marks the first time that an acupuncture article has been nominated for the Elsevier Atlas Award.You may click on the following link to take you the Elsevier Atlas Nominations page: https://www.elsevier.com/connect/atlas/nominations.

We will let you know should our article win!

Each month the Atlas Advisory Board are sent a selection of 10 articles to choose their winning Atlas article.
ELSEVIER.COM
Reference:
1. Fan AY, Miller DW, Bolash B, Bauer M, McDonald J, Faggert S, He H, Li YM, Matecki A, Camardella L, Koppelman MH, Stone JA, Meade L, Pang J. Acupuncture’s Role in Solving the Opioid Epidemic: Evidence, Cost-Effectiveness, and Care Availability for Acupuncture as a Primary, Non-Pharmacologic Method for Pain Relief and Management—White Paper 2017. J Integr Med. 2017; 15(6): 411–425.

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2017-09/27/c_136643493.htm

WASHINGTON, Sept. 26 (Xinhua) — In the wake of an opioid epidemic, acupuncturists in the United States issued a white paper on Tuesday, recommending acupuncture as a primary non-pharmacologic method for pain relief and management.

“The United States is facing a national opioid epidemic, and medical systems are in need of non-pharmacologic strategies that can be employed to decrease the public’s opioid dependence,” said the 21-page white paper.

Official figures showed that opioid overdoses kill 91 Americans every single day and more than half of those deaths involve prescription opioids.

Titled “Acupuncture’s Role in Solving the Opioid Epidemic,” the white paper said “acupuncture has emerged as a powerful, evidence-based, safe, cost-effective, and available treatment modality suitable to meeting this need.”

Organizations that contributed to this paper included the American Society of Acupuncturists, the American Alliance for Professional Acupuncture Safety, the Acupuncture Now Foundation, the American Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Association, and the American TCM Society and National Federation of TCM Organizations.

The white paper said acupuncture has been shown to be effective for treating various types of pain, with the strongest evidence emerging for back pain, neck pain, shoulder pain, chronic headache, and osteoarthritis.

It said mechanisms of action for acupuncture have been extensively researched, which found the ancient Chinese practice increase the production and release of endogenous opioids in animals and humans.

“Acupuncture should be recommended as a first line treatment for pain before opiates are prescribed, and may reduce opioid use,” it wrote.

“Further, acupuncture’s cost-effectiveness could dramatically decrease health care expenditures, both from the standpoint of treating acute pain and through avoiding the development of opioid addiction that requires costly care, destroys quality of life, and can lead to fatal overdose.”

The white paper came about a week after the U.S. National Association of Attorneys General sent a letter to America’s Health Insurance Plans, asking its insurance company members to review their payment and coverage policies in order to promote alternatives to opioids such as acupuncture.

Chen Y. A Perspective of Acupuncture Education in the US JCMAH.MS.ID.555773

Citation: Chen Y. A Perspective of Acupuncture Education in the United States. J Complement Med Alt Healthcare. 2019; 9(5): 555773. DOI: 0.19080/JCMAH.2019.09.555773

A good and informative article.

Abstract
Acupuncture education in the United States has a history of almost 50 years. The entry-level professional training dates back to the 1980’s as a milestone establishment of Council of Colleges of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine (CCAOM), Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine (ACAOM) and National Certification Commission for Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM). Besides mainland China, America has the largest organized and influential acupuncture and Chinese Medicine education system in the world. Now 54 accredited acupuncture colleges have offered Master’s Programs, Professional Doctoral Programs, and Advanced Practical Doctorial (DAOM) Programs in comprehensive standards and competencies. Although there are some challenging issues, acupuncture education trends move forward into entry-level doctoral level training, regional and national accreditation, and system-based education, which will lead this profession to play a great role in the American integrative medical system.
Keywords: Acupuncture; Education; Competencies; America

 

Fan AY. Gim Shek Ju赵金石. Chinese Medicine Culture 2016;1, 58-61

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/337064256_Gim_Shek_Ju_A_Pioneer_in_Acupuncture_Chinese_Medicine_Education_in_the_United_States

Citation: Fan AY. Gim Shek Ju: A Pioneer in Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine Education in the United States. Journal of Chinese Medicine Culture 2016; 1:58-61.

 

Gim Shek Ju: A Pioneer in Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine Education in the United States

Arthur Yin Fan

McLean Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, PLC. Vienna, VA 22182, USA

KEYWORDS: acupuncture; Chinese medicine; United States; Education; history of medicine; Gim Shek Ju

Correspondence: Arthur Yin Fan; Tel: +1-(703) 499-4428; E-mail: ArthurFan@ChineseMedicineDoctor.US

 

Several stories of pioneers establishing acupuncture and Chinese medicine (ACM) practices in the United States (U.S.) have been documented. However, the establishment of actual schools for acupuncture and Chinese medicine is one of the key signs that ACM has become an established profession. One of the first people who wanted to set-up a school for Chinese medicine in the United States was Dr. Tom Foo Yuen (谭富园, 89, Aug 7, 1858 – Jul 10, 1947) during the late 1800s in Los Angles, California. However, it was not until the time period of 1969-1970 that the first ACM school was established in the U.S. The school was called the Institute for Taoist Study in LA, with Dr. Gim Shek Ju as the only teacher.

Based on the recollection from some of his students, Dr. Gim Shek Ju (Gim, in short; 赵金石) was impressed by a group of Tai Chi students, most of them students at the University of California in Los Angles (UCLA).  At the urging of his friend’s Tai Chi students, he used acupuncture to treat these students and some of their relatives during a Chinese New Year celebration in Chinatown, LA  in 1969. It was after these acupuncture treatments that these students became interested in ACM and had their Tai Chi teacher, Master Marshall Hoo, a close friend of Gim, persuade Gim to teach them ACM. Gim broke the old Chinese tradition (that means only teaching to those within the family) and taught two classes of non-Asian students ACM during 1969 to 1970. These two classes of students became the key people in ACM development in the U.S., both in acupuncture or Chinese medicine legislation and professional development of Chinese medicine in the U.S. The classes taught by Gim were the origin of three professions: acupuncture and Chinese or Oriental medicine (for licensed acupuncturists, LAc or Oriental medicine doctors, OMD), medical acupuncture (for MD acupuncturists) and animal or veterinary acupuncture (for DVM acupuncturists) in the U.S.

Figure 1. Dr. Gim Shek Ju with a Shaolin Monk.

Dr. Ju arrived in the U.S. around the 1950s (Dr. Fan notes: based on personal research, he should arrive in 1957).  He did not settle in Chinatown, LA until the 1960s (around 1968).  He was still traveling back and forth to Hong Kong at that time because his own family was there.  He practice in LA was funded and organized by his third wife, Helen Robertson.  The clinic was in the apartment that they lived in. Helen was a veterinarian from Downey, CA and a former patient of Dr.Ju. She had suffered a debilitating trauma from a car accident that damaged her spine to the point that she could not stand up, but remained bent at a 90 degree angle.  After finding Dr. Ju via word of mouth, she was able to improve her condition.  Most of Dr.Ju’s patients were Caucasian, and not Chinese.  In fact, very few Chinese came to see him (the author notes: it is opposite to our “common sense”—many people believe Chinese medicine had its market because Chinese people, or say, Asian community uses it more).  Most of his patients were extremely ill, and suffering with debilitating pain.  Dr. Ju was able to treat patients with very little communication.  According to his daughter, Mamie Ju, Dr. Ju’s powers of intuition and understanding or hearing the body was probably daunting to many…even modern-day TCM practitioners.  But it was the “old” way, and in Mamie opinion, the right way to practice.  “Ancient TCM practitioners were most likely practicing Shamans, and I believe my father was a Shaman by birth”.  This is what made him very special. But it is difficult to explain this, even to other TCM practitioners.

Figure 2. Dr. Gim Shek Ju practice Tai Chi with a friend.

 

Figure 3. Dr. Tin Yau So in classroom of New England School of Acupuncture.

Dr.Ju and Dr. Tin Yau So (苏天佑) were colleagues at the Hong Kong College of Acupuncture; Dr. So was the founder. Dr.Ju strongly recommended Dr. So as the best teacher in ACM and let his students resume ACM under Dr. So; he flied with his student Steven Rosenblatt, as well as Steven’ s wife Kathleen, to Hong Kong to meet Dr. So, where these two American students actually studied there for one year in 1972. Per the invitation and handling of a visa by the National Acupuncture Association (founded by Dr.Ju’s students Bill Prensky, Steven Rosenblatt, etc.) , Dr. So arrived in LA in October,1973  as an acupuncturist in the UCLA acupuncture clinic.

Dr. So was one of the most influential individuals of the 20th century by formally bringing acupuncture education to the United States. He established the first acupuncture school in the U.S., the New England School of Acupuncture in Newton, Massachusetts in 1975 with the help of his (also Dr. Ju’s) students Steven Rosenblatt, Gene Bruno, Bill Prensky, etc. after overcoming great difficulties. To some extent, I could say that it was Dr. Gim Shek Ju who brought Dr. So to the U.S. that allowed him to become the father of Acupuncture and Chinese medicine education in the U.S.

Dr.Ju had a very thriving acupuncture practice treating patients inside his three bedroom apartment. He used one of the bedrooms as his main office and treatment room.  His living room was the waiting room.  There were people there from 8AM until after 5PM, but usually no later than 6PM. He often worked six days a week and was always busy doing something. He rarely rested.  He kept a very strict schedule.  He got up every morning before dawn and practiced Tai Chi. No-one knows when he learned Tai Chi.  Then he started his working day at 8AM.  He took a lunch break exactly at noon every day, and ate lunch in Chinatown with friends, probably his students too, and sometimes with his children on the weekends.  Dr.Ju was usually in bed by 8PM unless he had other things to do.  His students were not around regularly… or at least not on a regular basis.  Dr.Ju never really grasped the English language. His daughter often had to translate for patients who were trying to book appointments over the phone. Mamie often had to schedule appointments for him when he was out. His daughter…making trips to the herbal store to get formulas, and helping him in the room with some of the female patients.  Dr.Ju took many patients, the apartment was filled with people non-stop, and he accepted treatments outside of the clinic as well.  It was not unusual for his daughter to come home and find a limousine parked outside our apartment either waiting to pick up Dr.Ju or to drop him off. Dr. Ju never spoke about who his patients were.  He kept many of those things very, very private. He would not discuss many cases or anything in great detail.

His daughter remembers, when he was still involved with his American students, “I remember accompanying my father to UCLA where he gave a lecture about meridian/channel theory and how acupuncture worked.  Another thing my father did that was rather record-breaking at the time was perform anesthesia on a wisdom tooth patient using acupuncture.  I was maybe about 11 years-old at the time (1975) and I remember watching him do this on our old black and white television”.  It was all over the news in Los Angeles.

His daughter continued helping Dr.Ju with his practice on-and-off until age 14 (this was around 1978, when Gim was about 61 years-old).  At that time, Dr. Ju’s local practice had really slowed down.  He was traveling more than he was working at home.  He was invited to many places…particularly Mexico to perform acupuncture, and he had relationships with high officials and wealthy people there. He often stayed in Mexico for weeks at a time.

Dr. Ju died in Hong Kong in 1987, when he was 70 years old.

Acknowledgements

The author would like to thank Ms. Mamie Ju providing her father’s stories and reviewing the draft.

Reference

Fan AY. The earliest acupuncture school of the United States incubated in a Tai Chi Center in Los Angeles. J Integr Med 2014. J Integr Med. 2014 Nov;12(6):524-8.

Fan AY. The legendary life of Dr. Gim Shek Ju, the founding father of the education of acupuncture and Chinese medicine in the United States. J Integr Med. 2016 May;14(3):159-64. doi: 10.1016/S2095-4964(16)60260-1.

 

 

http://news.lnd.com.cn/system/2018/09/26/000017392.shtml

新华网波士顿9月26日电(记者郭一娜)首届哈佛国际医学气功太极论坛暨全美中医药学会医学气功太极专业委员会成立大会,近日在哈佛大学医学院附属麻省总医院会议中心举行。这是美国本土首次举办国际性大中型医学气功太极专业性会议。

大会的主题是“医学气功太极的研究进展以及人员培训”。

中国医学气功学会常务副会长兼秘书长刘天君,太极与气功研究专家、哈佛大学教授彼得.韦恩、赫波特.本森等与会并发表主题演讲。其中,彼得.韦恩发表了《“关注”我们的身体:太极对中老年平衡与认知影响的研究》的报告。韦恩曾于2000年到中国进修,并尝试运用西方科学阐明亚洲传统治疗原理。他还曾撰写“哈佛医学院太极拳指南”。会上,中美两国医学专家就医学气功、太极在海内外发展进行了深入探讨。

此次大会由全美中医药学会主办,全美中医药学会医学气功太极专业委员会承办。来自美国、欧洲、中国、日本等国医学气功太极专家、学者、爱好者及哈佛大学师生约120人参加了会议。

第四届美国中医药大会在贝尔维尤凯悦酒店召开 http://sea.uschinapress.com/2018/0807/1139133.shtml
2018-08-07 17:13 来源:西雅图在线 编辑:Jay

【侨报记者王馨谣8月6日西雅图报道】2018年8月4日至8月5日,第四届美国中医药大会暨太极集团国际中医药论坛在位于贝尔维尤的凯悦酒店(Hyatt Regency Bellevue)内隆重召开。

本次大会由美国中医校友联合会(TCMAAA)与全美中医药学会(ATCMA)主办,成都中医药大学北美校友会承办,美国南海公司(西雅图)协办。

成都中医药大学教授刘敏如、成都中医药大学教授廖品正、班康德博士(Dr. Dan Bensky)、太极集团秦少容总工程师、中国名中医张发荣教授、马寿椿教授、成都中医药大学书记刘毅教授、全美中医资格认证安全委员会主席布罗姆利博士(Dr. Afua Bromley)、贝尔维尤市议员李瑞麟、505集团来辉武教授等国内外中医学界专家莅临大会。

今年大会的主题是“中医药针灸的经典与临床”。大会以中医妇科及皮肤美容为主要讨论议题,也涉及到过敏性鼻炎,糖尿病,眼睛的疾病以及疼痛等常见疾病的治疗。同时,由多位妇科,皮肤科专家参与的妇科,皮肤科论坛,在现场回答大家临床上遇到的问题,并把他们自己临床几十年的经验和与会者们分享。

值得一提的是,本次大会还邀请到了两位国医大师刘敏如教授与廖品正教授。据介绍,两位大师均为80多岁的高龄,但依然不辞辛苦从中国来到美国,与在这里的中医药学者们交流经验。

在接受侨报记者采访时,中国第一位女国医大师刘敏如教授表示,这已是她第三次来到美国参加美国中医药大会。刘教授称,她来到美国的初衷是希望能够提高中医在国际上的地位。刘教授强调,在很多人认为中医是一种传统医学,但实际上中医正在与时俱进。临床上中医对一些疑难杂症的治疗甚有疗效。刘教授说,中医学发展,要在继承传统经典理论的基础上创造中医学的新观点、新学说、新理论。刘教授表示,这次的美国之行中她很欣喜的发现,在大西雅图地区的中医发展很好,相信在未来也会有长足的进步。

作为中国首位中医眼科博士导师廖品正在接受采访时表示,这是她第一次来到美国参加美国中医药大会。她既感叹于中医在美国发展,也希望在美的中医师们能够凝心聚力为中医在美国的发展继续做出贡献。她尤其希望能够通过这样的机会让更多的人重视中医治疗在眼科中的作用。

成都中医药大学书记刘毅教授也是第一次来到美国参加大会。刘毅向记者表示,近几年中医的发展受到越来越多人的关注,尤其在国际社会,中医被更多的人支持。而参加这次大会,中医校友们在海外的凝聚力让他很感动,他也坚信在海外中医师们的努力下,中医在海外的地位一定会有所提高。

全美中医药学会常务副会长兼美国中医校友联合会/全美中医药学会CEO魏辉告诉记者,根据今年1月最新的数据统计,目前全美共有中医师37866人,而这其中华人中医师只有8000人左右。这个数据反映出:在美国,华人中医师只占很小的一部分。魏会长称,通过全美中医药大会聚集在美的华人中医师,这样既可以交流互相的经验心得,也可以增进华人中医师们的凝聚力。而本次大会中有来自全球各地的中医师前来参加也足以证明中医的发展在进步。

此外,中国太极集团、505集团、CAI Corporation、NCCAOM、TCMZONE、西雅图移民之家Laura Counsell资深理财、巴斯蒂尔大学(Bastyr University)、Atlantic Financial Group,李彩芹、UPC Medical Supplies美国太平洋药业、Active herb Technology、Bio Essence herbal Essentials Inc.、E-Fong Herb Inc.中国华林公司酸碱平项目武汉德瑞团队、KPC producers Inc.、Blue light Inc.、四川好医生药业集团、发龙公司、奇正藏药、American Acupuncture council、TS Emporium、Marathon Ginseng Gardens这些赞助商和参展商也为本次大会的顺利召开提供了不可或缺的支持。

太极集团卿玉玲教授、中国名医张发荣、金鸣博士、谢克蓉教授、沈晓雄博士、刘宁教授、郑崇勇主任中医师、苏毅文教授、刘国晖教授、凯瑟琳·卢米埃尔博士(Dr. Kathleen Lumiere)、段俊国教授等多位中医师们带来了经验讲座。身为本次大会顾问的西雅图马寿椿博士和美国道教文化学院院长莫至城道长给大家带来了养生公益讲座。美国全国针灸中医认证委员会NCCAOM派出代表团向大会介绍了美国中医师针灸师的认证以及最近的一些政策变化,今年针灸师正式获得独立的职业代码,使这个行业正式成为美联邦认可的一个健康保健类职业。华盛顿州的针灸和东方医药协会(WEAMA), 两所中医针灸相关院校巴斯蒂尔大学(Bastyr University) 和 SIOM 的师生们都积极参与支持大会。

现场还有气功晨练、妇科大论坛交流等活动,活动参展商们也摆出的摊位。晚上精彩的节目表演更是将大会推向了高潮,在欢声笑语中,第四届美国中医药大会暨太极集团国际中医药论坛完美落幕。

 

来源:新华社作者:杨士龙 吴小军责任编辑:柳晨

新华社纽约1月18日电(新华社记者杨士龙 吴小军)如果没有碰到“针灸医师”魏辉,美国纽约芭蕾舞学校新生妮可的芭蕾梦可能早就碎了。

妮可家住佛罗里达州西棕榈滩,去年年初参加佛州一次芭蕾舞比赛前韧带拉伤,当地医生建议去医院接受手术治疗,但那样会错过比赛。看到孩子的医疗保险可支付大部分针灸治疗费用,母亲雅西卡抱着试试看的心情,带女儿去了魏辉的针灸诊所。没想到只扎了两次针,辅以艾灸治疗,小姑娘就得以顺利参赛并获奖。后来,妮可又去魏辉那儿巩固治疗了6次。

去年9月,妮可到纽约上学前,特地与母亲一起去跟魏辉道谢并告别。雅西卡当天在自己脸谱账户上贴出了女儿与魏辉的合影,并配文说,魏辉是她们“最喜爱的针灸医师”,称赞她“用爱心和耐心让女儿免除了对针灸和拔罐的恐惧感”,成功解除了孩子的病痛。

从不熟悉到逐渐认可,甚至依赖,雅西卡母女对针灸乃至中医的认识过程,是美国社会日渐接受和认可中医的一个缩影。

“中医正在被越来越多的美国人认可。”1999年,魏辉从北京中医药大学毕业后移民美国,目前是全美中医药学会常务副会长。她在接受新华社记者电话采访时说:“三四年前,来我这里的病人,用保险支付针灸费的只有5%,现在这个数字超过了30%。”

她介绍说,1997年5月,美国国家卫生研究院(NIH)召开了针灸共识会议,决定承认中国针灸并正式应用于患者的临床治疗,这标志着美国在联邦层面正式认可了针灸。

美国50个州中,已有46个州及华盛顿特区通过了针灸立法,各州立法有所不同,但反映出地方政府对针灸这一健康产业的重视。资料显示,目前全美有执照的针灸师有4万左右,每年接受针灸等“整合治疗”的人口约3800万,已形成一个产值数十亿美元的重要产业。

“以前谈针灸和中医,这边人习惯称‘替代疗法’,现在称‘整合医疗’,明确了它是社会健保机制的一部分。”大纽约中医针灸学会副会长陈德成完全赞成魏辉的看法。身为南京中医药大学针灸专业博士的陈德成介绍说,针灸已通过立法的各州被大多数商业保险公司定点、定向、定额为医疗保险项目。

美国政府对“非正规传统医学”(相对于西医)研究工作的支持力度也在逐年加大。NIH成立的国家补充替代医学研究中心,每年经费高达1亿多美元,主要任务是研究各种补充替代医学和疗法,其中对针灸和中药的研究已有几十个项目,太极拳、气功和推拿等也在研究之列。

魏辉和陈德成均表示,中医针灸之所以逐渐从健保产业的边缘走向中心,是与中医“治未病”的理念以及独特显著疗效分不开。更现实的是,相对于西医,很多种病的中医治疗费用相对较低,风险小,候诊时间短。

“比如说,一些膝盖疼的病人,医院都建议手术替换,费用高不说,人工关节只管10多年,之后怎么办呢?”陈德成说。“我的不少病人都很感激地说,是我帮他们远离了手术台。”

然而,在“西医是正统”的美国,中医真正被全面认可还是远景。针灸、推拿、艾灸等与中医药被区别对待,即便是已被普遍接受的针灸业,也面临被瓜分蚕食和改头换面的危险。

陈德成说,一些西医根本未接受任何针灸培训,就宣称自己掌握了针灸技能,以抢夺针灸市场,当治疗效果不佳时,他们不认为自己技术不精,而是埋怨针灸无效,严重影响了针灸在公众中的良好形象。

此外,大多数针灸医生活跃在临床前线,针灸科研是一个弱项,而西医作为“标准的制定者和判断者”,常用循证医学的标准来衡量中医针灸。“中医针灸今后应加强科研,还要申请专利保护自己权益,”魏辉说。

陈德成指出,中医针灸界应该形成合力,推动立法和参与规则制定来最大限度地保护自身权益。例如,在美国中医校友联合会基础上建立起来的全美中医药学会为提升中医学术水平,保护行业利益,扩大中医针灸的影响发挥了重要作用。

新华社华盛顿9月17日电 专访:“针灸是个好东西”——访全美中医药学会会长田海河

http://www.xinhuanet.com//health/2017-09/19/c_1121684776.htm

新华社记者林小春

第三届美国中医药大会16日至17日在华盛顿举行,来自美国、中国等国的300余名中医药专家参会。就中医在美国面临的机遇和挑战,会议主办方之一、全美中医药学会会长田海河接受新华社记者专访时说,“针灸是个好东西”,但科研仍有待进一步加强,同时中药发展也应及早提到日程上来。

田海河说,自美国前总统尼克松访华把中医带回美国,至今已45年。经过多年坎坷,中医在美国有了长足发展,现在已有46个州和华盛顿特区完成了针灸立法,目前各类有执照的针灸医生约有4.5万人。

“这个发展形势很好,但是学术水平良莠不齐,而且中医尚未进入医学主流体系,”田海河说,“就像美国人选择餐馆时还是以西餐为主,喜欢中餐的人虽有,但仍不占多数。要把中医带入美国主流社会,我们还有很多工作要做。”

田海河说,作为外来医学,中医在美国“还是会受到一定排挤”,虽然临床、科研等为针灸有效性提供了一些证据,但还不是非常充足,“需要我们更有效地开展工作,提供更有说服力的证据,让民众、媒体以及立法、保险等各方面能更进一步认可中医,接受针灸”。

他说,很多人都认识到针灸的价值,近期一些其他行业也想参与其中。“我们欢迎更多人来做针灸,惠及民众,但有些人只接受了很少的训练,就提供针灸服务,还有人把针灸改成‘干针’,试图绕过法律和执业范围限制去做针灸,非但没效果,还给病人带来安全隐患,所以我们要反对,并普及知识,帮助民众找到合格的针灸师”。

田海河介绍说,“干针”本来就源于针灸,有人把针灸“改头换面”,说跟中医无关,“这是一种剽窃行为”。

谈到中药在美国的发展,田海河认为,中药在美国未列入药物范畴,只能归类为食品补充剂,不能宣传治疗效果,这限制了中药的广泛应用和发展。

田海河说,这次大会是由全美中医药学会和美国中医校友联合会主办,目的就是团结更多的华裔和非华裔中医药相关人士,共同探讨如何抓住机会,应对挑战,提升整体学术水平,引领中医药在美国向正确方向发展。

在这次大会上,世界针灸学会联合会主席、中国针灸学会会长刘保延作了题为《针灸临床疗效研究的思考与实践》的主题报告。他指出,虽然针灸临床研究论文在1992年以后快速增长,但一直没有形成系统的临床评价方法,缺乏高质量研究数据,为此中医学界制定了针灸临床研究和技术操作等一系列规范并仍在继续完善,希望按照国际通行标准,“推动针灸堂堂正正进入主流医学体系”。

美国食品和药物管理局植物学评审组官员李静介绍了该机构有关植物新药的评审情况。她指出,截至去年年底,共有超过650种植物药物提出或通过“新药临床试验申请”,其中绝大多数处于二期临床试验阶段,有两种获准上市。如果把植物药物按全新成分的药物看待,这个通过率“还不错”。

会上,世界中医药学会联合会秘书长桑滨生介绍了中国《中医药法》及其对海外的影响,来自美国国家卫生研究院等多家机构的十多位专家学者作了学术报告。大会主要赞助企业同仁堂也介绍了其国际化之路,这家企业已在纽约、旧金山和洛杉矶开设分店,正致力于提升这一中国品牌在美国的知名度。

2019-10-07 22:00:50 来源: 新华网

新华社洛杉矶10月6日电(记者谭晶晶 高山)第五届美国中医药大会6日在洛杉矶闭幕,来自世界各地的200余名中医药界代表和专家学者汇聚一堂,探讨了中医药理论研究的最新进展。

本次会议由全美中医药学会主办。为期两天的会议上,来自美国加州大学洛杉矶分校、中国湖北中医药大学、美国食品和药物管理局等机构的专家学者就促进中医药现代化和国际化、新时代中医药发展面临的机遇与挑战、如何将传统草药研制成植物新药等课题发表了主旨演讲。会议期间还举行了有关风湿病疼痛的中医治疗、妇科盆腔炎的中药治疗等课题的专题讲座。

在专题讲座中,北京中医药大学第三临床医学院针灸微创肿瘤科主任黄金昶介绍了针灸治疗恶性积液、手足综合征、上腔静脉综合征等肿瘤并发症的最新研究进展。黄金昶在接受新华社记者采访时说,各国中医药界代表就中医领域最新研究成果进行探讨,分享经验,有助于进一步扩大中医在海外的影响力,并通过中医药文化的传播来弘扬中国文化。